A OUTDOOR STORAGE SHED FOR MY BBQ GRILL #7: Door Frames - Tenoning work and glue-up

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Blog entry by stefang posted 06-23-2015 02:49 PM 1493 reads 1 time favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 6: Door Frames - Mortising work Part 7 of A OUTDOOR STORAGE SHED FOR MY BBQ GRILL series Part 8: Door Hinges »

I thought I had made a measuring/cutting mistake on the horizontal door frame pieces, but it turned out to not be so. That saved me a lot of time and I was happy that I wasn’t so sloppy after all.

Today’s Work
I marked up one horizontal frame piece in preparation for cutting the tenons. Here I have set up my sliding table on the saw to cut the tenon shoulders. You can see that I have clamped a spacer to the fence to help make repeatable cuts on all 6 pieces. see below

Here I am setting the blade height with my shop made tool. see Below

And then taking a test cut to confirm the correct blade height. see below

And here is the first shoulder cut and then on to the bandsaw to cut the cheeks and edges. see below

After cutting the tenons I rounded the edges on them to match the rounded end of the mortises and then I did a dry fit. Everything went together well. I then measured the total width of the two doors and compared that with the opening on the shed and it was right on. That happens sometimes. Sorry, forgot to take a photo of the tenons.

Finally I glued the door frames up with polyurethane glue (because it’s waterproof). I am not too worried about the appearance of these frames except they have to be square and flat. They will be on the inside of the doors and vertical tongue and groove panelling will be fastened to the outside. Not pretty, buy it allows the rain to run off quite well and provides no resting places for water. see below

That’s it for today. Not a particularly interesting project, but blogging it gives me an excuse to socialize a little and it’s nice to document the build so that when I get too old to do anything I will be able to look back on some of my little projects. That time probably isn’t very far off!

Thanks for following with.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

9 comments so far

View Dutchy's profile


1976 posts in 1592 days

#1 posted 06-23-2015 08:23 PM

Looks good Mike. Glad te hear that it isn,t the wrong measure.

It took a second and than I saw you have a “left” table saw (5 in 1). Two years ago I have considered to by a same (different brand, same manufacturer) machine but final I bought a Sicar.

-- My englisch is bad but how is your dutch?

View kiefer's profile


4873 posts in 2090 days

#2 posted 06-23-2015 10:54 PM

I see you cutting the tennon cheeks with the band saw just like my uncle did way back then ,would a table saw cut not be better since the tennon is only two inches long .
Looking good !


-- Kiefer

View Schwieb's profile


1792 posts in 2885 days

#3 posted 06-24-2015 04:25 AM

You go Mike! If the bandsaw is tuned right, it does a fine job of cutting teonos. I love doing that kind of basic joinery, refining the fit with a chisel, my kind of stuff. I am in Cody, WY on a cross country trip. I happened on a TV program about a railroad trip in Norway and thought, I want to do that and thought of the chance to visit you. Who knows?

-- Dr. Ken, Florida - Durch harte arbeit werden Träume wahr.

View stefang's profile


15512 posts in 2758 days

#4 posted 06-24-2015 08:47 AM

Jan I’ve had this Kitty combination machine for close to 20 years and it has been very reliable and capable of quite accurate work. Most combination machines are heavier and probably better quality. I chose this machine primarily on the basis of it’s low price, but It did seem adequate for my hobby woodworking and I haven’t been disappointed. A big plus with this relatively light weight machine is that it is mounted on wheels and I can easily spin it around to access the jointing/planing and mortising functions.

Klaus Yes, tenoning on the table saw is more accurate and perhaps faster too, but I was too lazy to set up my jig as I didn’t think it was worth the trouble for this particular project.

Ken I hope you take that trip to Norway Ken, it would be really nice to meet you in person. Meanwhile I hope you are enjoying your road trip.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View greg48's profile


588 posts in 2181 days

#5 posted 06-24-2015 03:31 PM

You’re truly an inspiration for all of us who are in no particular rush to get things done quickly. Life is to good to rush through. I am enjoying your well paced blog.

-- Greg, No. Cal. - "Gaudete in Domino Semper"

View stefang's profile


15512 posts in 2758 days

#6 posted 06-24-2015 04:17 PM

Thanks Greg. Most of us get in the habit of being in a hurry all the time during our work years and raising kids and maintaining our homes, etc., but I’ve been retired long enough now to have broken that habit and of course my age is slowing me down quite a lot these days too. That’s one of the reasons the old folks are always complaining that they have less time now than they ever did, lol.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View doubleDD's profile


5072 posts in 1467 days

#7 posted 06-24-2015 08:38 PM

I enjoy reading your blogs Mike. You can always pick up a idea or two from reading what others are doing. The band saw tenon is a good quick idea for a small project.

-- Dave, Downers Grove, Il. -------- When you run out of ideas, start building your dreams.

View kiefer's profile


4873 posts in 2090 days

#8 posted 06-24-2015 08:52 PM

That is the best explanation of retired people having a lack of time .
I love it .

That’s one of the reasons the old folks are always complaining that they have less time now than they ever did, lol.


-- Kiefer

View stefang's profile


15512 posts in 2758 days

#9 posted 06-24-2015 08:57 PM

Thanks Dave. I don’t really have any plan beyond some fuzzy thoughts. I’m just letting the project evolve as I work on it, but I figured that it can be interesting to see what kind of tools are being used and some of my methods so folks can compare how they do things (better than me, I hope). I finally solved how I want to do the hinges today, so I plan to work on getting them installed tomorrow.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

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