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A OUTDOOR STORAGE SHED FOR MY BBQ GRILL #2: Sizing the Shed

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Blog entry by stefang posted 05-31-2015 03:05 PM 3570 reads 1 time favorited 23 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: CONSTRUCTING THE SIDES Part 2 of A OUTDOOR STORAGE SHED FOR MY BBQ GRILL series Part 3: Stretchers and Siding Panels »

You might be wondering why I am going to all the bother with such a heavy construction. Well, the weather gets pretty hairy here in the Fall and Winter, wet and wild! We are very close to the coast and we our house also sits on the highest point in our town which is about 335ft. above sea level, so we get some pretty high winds and strong storms here. I’m not planning to attach it to the house wall as I want it to be easily moveable when we wash and paint the house walls. Luckily it’s sitting in a more or less protected place, but it isn’t a good idea to be too optimistic.

Test Fitting
With the sides completed I wanted to make sure the actual pieces will actually accommodate my gas grill and also fit the space reserved for it. I plan to cover the sides with the same siding panelling on the house, so it was important to leave some space for the thickness of that panelling on the shed sides in the rather confined space where the shed will be located as shown below. The space between our rain gutter pipe and our washroom window turned out to be just big enough to accommodate the shed. Whew!

Preparing the Stretchers (connecting pieces)
The farm is constructed with what you would call 2X4’s in the States, but which are actually 1-3/8” thick and 3” wide. The stretchers on the back will be the same dimensions while the top stretchers are the 2X4’s with half the thickness. I resawed the 2X4’s in half for those pieces.

After cutting all the stretchers I marked them for drilling the screw holes for fastening to the end frames, as shown below

This blog is probably pretty boring, but I was out of the loop so long that you can just consider it a sign of life.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.



23 comments so far

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7174 posts in 2264 days


#1 posted 05-31-2015 03:37 PM

Good to see you back Mike. That’s a fine little shed you are building.
....... maybe a summer camp out spot for a grandkid ….

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View  woodshaver (Tony)  's profile

woodshaver (Tony)

4023 posts in 2819 days


#2 posted 05-31-2015 03:47 PM

Looking good Mike! It’s coming along nicely! I have had a few of those “Whew” moments my self at times. Glad it fit between the pipe and window the way you needed it to fit. I bet that put a smile on your face when you made that discovery!

-- Tony C UAW, St Augustine FL, My high school shop teacher said "You can do it"... Now I can't stop!

View sharad's profile

sharad

1108 posts in 3270 days


#3 posted 05-31-2015 03:50 PM

Even at this stage it is looking so nice.

Sharad

-- “If someone feels that they had never made a mistake in their life, then it means they have never tried a new thing in their life”.-Albert Einstein

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

7798 posts in 2769 days


#4 posted 05-31-2015 03:58 PM

its looking pretty good mike, i cant wait to see the finished shed, maybe the ceiling should have some cool cooper panels within it and some marquetry on the front doors, maybe a whole chicken in a rotisserie mode , if your going to all the trouble of this nice shed for the grill, it should have all of your skills displayed, so how about some carved figures that sit within a open box , so when you swing the doors open to grill, you see these carved figures standing at a small grill that you can make, hey you might as well go all the way with this….and no charge for the ideas….LOL…

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3964 posts in 2630 days


#5 posted 05-31-2015 03:58 PM

Let’s see…...you are tailoring the coat for a perfect fit, and I assume that makes the plastic cover the…........underwear or a smock. No, it would have to be underwear because otherwise Mr. Weber would be going about sans underwear, and you and I are too old and stodgy for that.

But then again, perhaps you are making a beach house for Mr. Weber, and he is just wearing his bathing suit?

I have another member of the Weber family that has taken up housekeeping on my front porch. Perhaps they could be pen pals…........?

I don’t know, this is way to complicated for me on a Sunday morning before I have sufficiently reduced the concentration of blood in my caffeine stream.

I will try to understand this again later when I can open up my eyes sufficiently to really see what is going on….........

slurp, slurp…......

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

7798 posts in 2769 days


#6 posted 05-31-2015 04:03 PM

i can smell the Java all the way down here….use a napkin along with those slurps jim…lol…my eyes are fully open and yes this is going to be the taj mahal of grill covers….ive given my 2 cents on more improvements….

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View Druid's profile

Druid

1312 posts in 2261 days


#7 posted 05-31-2015 05:39 PM

Good to hear from you Mike. Interesting hammer . . . Looks identical to one my dad had from England, and he always referred to it as a “floor layer’s” hammer. First time I’ve seen another one like it.
Waiting for the next update.

-- John, British Columbia, Canada

View SPalm's profile

SPalm

5257 posts in 3348 days


#8 posted 05-31-2015 07:43 PM

Dang, you make 2×4 construction look pretty.
Thanks for the update.

Steve

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

5730 posts in 2833 days


#9 posted 05-31-2015 08:07 PM

After graduation from college in Wisconsin, very northern Wisonsin, I took a job with an Illinois company that sent movers to fetch my belongings to move them South. This was January of 1969 and there was bout 60”of snow on the ground and drifts that were much higher. The movers asked me “where is your barbecue grill?” I told them I had no idea as it was completely hidden by snow drifts along the sidea of the house. It stayed buried!

Covering and protecting the grill is a good idea!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

3392 posts in 1670 days


#10 posted 05-31-2015 08:52 PM

Hello Mike,

Pretty boring Blog…

Far from boring Blog I must say. and add, anything to do with a BBQ or ”Green Egg” is always interesting,
The fitup is a very wise move, Toby and I did that with his transportable bar as soon as the carcass was finished we lifted it out to his Van and did a test load, to ensure all was well!

I also use templates to mark drilling holes so again interesting to see others do the same. A simple procedure avoids odd placed screws and avoids splitting the end timbers.

Materials, are you using Baltic Pine?

Other observations.
Are your decking boards weathered grey or have you painted them?
Out of the loop…. yes it was noted, and you were also missed, resulting in some enquiries being made as to your welfare !!
Speaking of welfare do you know what Jim ( and possibly Grizz) put in their coffee? or was it the result of something pre coffee?

-- Regards Robert

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

17172 posts in 2571 days


#11 posted 05-31-2015 09:42 PM

Good progress Mike. You have it fitting nicely!!

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View Moosesman's profile

Moosesman

132 posts in 1970 days


#12 posted 05-31-2015 10:35 PM

Looking forward to seeing the next post. This is a good idea and looks great so far

-- The reward of art is not fame or success but intoxication: that is why so many bad artists are unable to give it up. Jean Cocteau

View hunter71's profile

hunter71

2732 posts in 2652 days


#13 posted 06-01-2015 02:31 AM

Too many grills are ruined due to lack of care. We also keep ours under cover and clean and it has quite a few years on it. Great idea.

-- A childs smile is payment enough.

View stefang's profile

stefang

15512 posts in 2800 days


#14 posted 06-01-2015 08:58 AM

Thanks everyone for the kind comments.

Paul My youngest grandkid is now 16, so I guess I will have to wait for the great grandkids.

Bob I appreciate all the enhancements you suggest, but I wouldn’t want to draw all the tourists away from the Taj mahal as they need the money more than we do.

John I bought that hammer about 50 years ago and I have never found one with better balance since.

Jim Yes, you got it (I think).

Oldnovice I know a lot about the snow in Wisconsin as I was born there. Here’s a picture of me in Superior with my cute nurse girlfriend when I was about 3 or 4 years old (1943-44). I was ready to defend her from the axis forces. Don’t be shocked by the age difference. There was a shortage of men on the home front in those days.

Rob The deck boards are oiled gray. It is specially formulated deck oil. We put it on with a roller. The roller also has a quick locking feature so that ‘rub’ the oil in after rolling it on to work it into the wood fibers. The oil has color pigment mixed in. We have been doing it in a very dark brown in the past, but we think the grey looks a lot better and cleaner.

I doubt it’s the coffee. Jim and Bob are just funny guys.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

3392 posts in 1670 days


#15 posted 06-01-2015 10:34 AM

Oh Mike what a charmer you are !

-- Regards Robert

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