LumberJocks

CHRISTMAS GIFT BASKETS #8: Completing the project

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Blog entry by stefang posted 10-28-2014 07:59 PM 2033 reads 0 times favorited 16 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 7: Sanding and gluing Part 8 of CHRISTMAS GIFT BASKETS series no next part

At the end of the last blog the sides and bottom had been glued up and the foot frames and top rim frames had been each glued together in preparation for gluing them onto the basket.

A RECAP OF THE BASKET’S COMPONENTS
There are only four main components that make up the basket. These are; the foot frame, the top rim frame, the basket sides and the bottom piece. So four small projects make up the whole. see below

YOU CAN DRAG AND DROP THE PHOTO BELOW INTO YOUR PHOTO GALLERY AND PRINT IT OUT TO FULL SIZE

Finished dimensions for the components

  1. Foot Frame, four pcs,: 8mm thick X 15mm wide X 240mm long
    The foot frame pieces have 15 deg. parallel top and bottom edges with mitered ends. That means that the top and bottom edges will be flat on the top and bottom with the foot sides sloping at an angle of 15 deg. from top to bottom.It is glued directly onto the bottom edge of the basket sides.
  2. Top Rim, four pcs.; 7mm thick X 15mm wide X 248mm long
    The top rim has 15 deg. parallel inside and outside edges with mitered ends. Bow-ties have been added to it’s corners to reinforce the relatively thin stock and to reinforce the the basket side miters. It is glued directly onto the top edge of the basket sides.
  3. Basket Sides, 4 sides; 7mm thick X 67mm wide X 227mm long
    Each basket side has a 6mm groove for the bottom running the full length of the side and beginning 3mm from the bottom edge.
  4. Bottom, 2pcs with a glue joint in the middle reinforced with bow-ties, alternatively a solid plywood panel with or without bow-ties. finished dimensions; square 195mm.
  • WORK PROGRESS

Having already glued up the sides and bottoms and the feet frames I sanded the top and bottom edges flat on my sanding board to prepare them for gluing onto the top rim and the feet. I used my block plane to get it almost flat before sanding. This was done to ensure good glue joints which are essential to the appearance of the finished baskets. see below

Next I glued the feet frames onto the bottom edges of the baskets. The hole you see in the side is where a piece got broken out. More about that later. see below

While waiting for the glue to dry on the feet I started cutting out the holes to receive the bow-ties on the top rim. I traced each bow-tie onto the rim numbering each outline with it’s corresponding bow-tie to ensure a tight fit. I cut out the bow-tie holes for one rim at a time and glued them in before proceeding to the next rim in order to avoid dealing with too many small pieces at once. After letting the glue dry, the top rims were sanded flat. This time I used my drum sander because the rims are too thin to get a good grip for to sand them on the sanding board, although I could have used double sided tape to tape some scrap handles on them if I wanted to use the sanding board.

The top rims were glued on the following day and that completed the construction phase for all 5 baskets. The best way to do this is to place the frame on the bench, put glue on the top edges of the basket sides while holding the basket upsides down to prevent glue from running onto the fretwork, the place the basket still upside down onto the top rim. Line up the corners of the basket with the miter joints on the top rim as shown in the 2nd photo below. this will center it good enough. I left the top rim sides oversize in width and length so could trim it to an exact fit later. see below

FINISHING UP

Problem
I had a problem on some of the baskets. Piece fell out where I had sawed veins on the leaves. I didn’t have this problem with 3 pine baskets I made before. Last time I cut these veins with a #3 blade and the entry holes were made with 1.5mm drill bit. On these baskets a #5 blade and a 3mm drill bit were used. this was because even my small bit holder can’t hold a 1.5 mm bit and all I had was the 3mm. I used a smaller drill press last time (gave it to my son in Sweden), and I was having problems getting the blade holder in my scroll saw to hold a # blade (I still have to fix that). Anyway, the larger blade and bit cause a weakness and the broke off under handling.

The fix was pretty easy. The pieces were located back where they belonged and I just thinned out my hot hide glue and put it into the vein saw kerfs. I did this on all the veining on the face and inside of all the sides to make sure this would not happen again. The are now bomb proof.

The veining is optional. My wife says she doesn’t like it, but I do. however, I did a rather poor job of cutting them (dull blade-duh). It doesn’t look too bad to me, but I’m trying to be positive.

  • Last things done prior to applying a finish
    The next work was to trim the outside and inside edges of the top rim to 15 deg. On the inside of the rim I just trimmed the edge to the same angle as the sides and flush with the inside of the sides. This more or less automatically produced the correct angle. I started at one inside end with a sharp chisel and worked backward from that so that I was working downhill with the grain to prevent splitting until running out of workspace, then working the same way from the other end. I knew I was finished when the glue line disappeared. I was very careful to not let the corner of my chisel cut into the side as I worked. I used the angle side as a guide the whole time. see below

After the inside edge was done I used my block plane to plane a 15 deg. angle on the outside of the top rim. I eyeballed the angle, but I did measure the width to make sure that the rims were consistent in width all the way around. see below

Next up was to check all my miters around the outside to see whether they were good enough or if they needed any tuning. The were all good, but some needed a little sanding to perfect them. After that was done I checked to see that the glue joint where the feet meet the bottom to make sure that there was no ugly overhang from the side pieces or the feet pieces. There were a few spots with some minor overhang that I eliminated by smoothing with my chisel as shown. see below

The last thing I did was to sand all the surfaces smooth and ready for finishing and here is one of the baskets after sanding. They all came out like this one.

So that is it. The only thing remaining is to figure out how to get the pattern to you in actual size. I have made a PDF with the pattern so it can be printed out in actual size and sent via email, so if you want the pattern please send your email address to me on a PM and I’ll send it. If there is another way that you want to do this and you know how, let me know.

Please feel free to make any changes you wish to the design and/or the dimensions. If you do make one of these whether this one or another version I would be grateful for any feedback to see how it went for you. I am also happy to answer and questions or lend any support I can to enable to finish this project.

I hope you were able to understand my description of the work. Thanks for following with.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.



16 comments so far

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

2012 posts in 1630 days


#1 posted 10-28-2014 08:06 PM

Looks good Mike. Nice for a cozy breakfast.

-- My englisch is bad but how is your dutch?

View stefang's profile

stefang

15512 posts in 2795 days


#2 posted 10-28-2014 08:10 PM

Thanks Dutchy. I am getting tired of looking at them. I’ll be very happy when the finish has been sprayed on so I don’t have to think about them anymore.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Druid's profile

Druid

1299 posts in 2256 days


#3 posted 10-28-2014 08:59 PM

Well done blog Mike. Thanks.

-- John, British Columbia, Canada

View johnhutchinson's profile

johnhutchinson

1193 posts in 1090 days


#4 posted 10-28-2014 10:35 PM

Standing ovation !!! I’m almost sorry to see them come to an end.
I hate to disagree with your wife (not really :) but I think some of the delicacy of the baskets would be lost without the veining.
Has you-know-who seen this? It’s okay to be a squeaky wheel.

-- John - Central Ohio - "too much is never enough"

View Schwieb's profile

Schwieb

1797 posts in 2922 days


#5 posted 10-28-2014 11:15 PM

Mike this has been an great blog, and I want to commend you for the effort it takes to do this technologically, much less planning an all that goes with that. You’ve done a great job here and I have the greatest respect for what you have accomplished. I hope the recipients will feel the same. I’ve been thinking a bout Christmas but have been so bogged down in other things, that I have not made more than a wish toward making something so special as this. Really well done my friend.

-- Dr. Ken, Florida - Durch harte arbeit werden Träume wahr.

View CFrye's profile

CFrye

8738 posts in 1301 days


#6 posted 10-28-2014 11:49 PM

Mike, I too, would like to add my appreciation for the blog. Is there any additional tidbit you would add on cutting the upper rims for the bowties? That looks particularly fragile/prone to splitting.

-- God bless, Candy

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7165 posts in 2259 days


#7 posted 10-29-2014 12:55 AM

Great tutorial Mike and a great result.
Looking at your photos, I couldn’t help but pause on your hand guiding the block plane. Have you ever just stared at your hands and felt a kind of awe about what they can do? They are by far the very very best tools we will ever have. Yours seem wise and true.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View Kaleb the Swede's profile

Kaleb the Swede

1727 posts in 1430 days


#8 posted 10-29-2014 02:36 AM

Amazing work Mike. And thanks for this blog, it was a nice read and to see it come together was amazing

-- Just trying to build something beautiful

View stefang's profile

stefang

15512 posts in 2795 days


#9 posted 10-29-2014 10:08 AM

John (Druid) Thank you for your positive comments and following my project.

John H. Thank you. No, I haven’t heard from our mutual friend yet.

Ken Thanks, my head is already swelling, but unfortunately my brain remains the same size.

Candy Thank you. The holes for the bow-ties are not difficult to cut, but I would not try turning the corners while cutting them. It is better to cut into the corners from each side and clean them up after most of the waste is removed. Also you have to remember to stay inside the lines. I found that the 0.7mm lead pencil I traced with would not get right into the edge of the bow-tie. I took that into account when I sawed out the hole leaving just a hair of a white line between the the traced line and where I cut. Please ask if that isn’t clear.

Paul Thanks. I have watched many craftsmen at work including my two artistic sons. I feel more like a bull in a china shop compared to the thoughtful exacting way they tackle handwork, but yes, I do love the handwork part and I do try to include a reasonable amount of it in my projects. I am getting better with experience, but I have no craftsman genes. I don’t let that discourage me though because I have a deep love for woodworking.

Kaleb* Thanks, 2 of these baskets are headed to Sweden for Christmas to join the other 3 already there.

Sorry about the formatting problems. It’s not my fault!


-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7165 posts in 2259 days


#10 posted 10-29-2014 02:40 PM

The reference was to your hands. Mike. What tool they are using or task they are doing is irrelevant to my comment.
I just have an awe about how amazing they are and how lucky we are to have them. Maybe it’s just me. :-)

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View stefang's profile

stefang

15512 posts in 2795 days


#11 posted 10-29-2014 04:45 PM

I remember a Peanuts comic strip where Charley Brown was going on about his hands as he looked intently at them; “These hands, these hands that may someday save the world” and his sister replied “They’ve got jelly on them” I get your drift Paul and that might be the case for yourself, but I have to admit that I’m usually in awe about what mine can’t do.

Since I was a kid I dreamed about being able to make stuff or draw pictures or engrave something. My older brother who turned out to be the creative director in an ad agency, coincidentally like my oldest son, could make the most incredible stuff as a kid. Custom car models from balsa wood, beautiful drawings, hand carved wooden chains and a host of other things all perfectly done while I played cowboys and indians and the only thing I made was a nuisance of myself. I remember buying the wheels for a soap box derby car that never got built.

All that said, it is pretty amazing what a person (even me on occasion) can do with his hands and a simple hand tool or two. My favorite hand tool, unlike many others, is not the hand plane, my greatest love goes to the lowly chisel. It is perhaps the most important and versatile hand tool ever invented, and maybe the ultimate of all hand tools. It is after all the precursor of the plane, even though it can do far more than a plane can, and in the right hands it can do wonders, like making stone blocks to build pyramids with, making round things from a spinning workpieces and carving, shaping and a host of other things, not to mention what it could do in the hands of Michaelangelo and his like.

I’m not sure if this is a rant or I just got caught up in the spirit of the discussion. I hope it doesn’t make you think I’m a nut.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View CFrye's profile

CFrye

8738 posts in 1301 days


#12 posted 10-29-2014 06:57 PM

Yes, I understand. Thank you, Mike. Love the Peanuts reference!

-- God bless, Candy

View Roger's profile

Roger

19867 posts in 2265 days


#13 posted 10-29-2014 10:16 PM

I agree, gr8 tutorial, and, gr8 builds Mike. There will be happy happy happy recipients on Christmas.

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Keep your dust collector fed. Kentuk55@yahoo.com

View Schwieb's profile

Schwieb

1797 posts in 2922 days


#14 posted 10-29-2014 11:55 PM

Mike , I had to laugh about your comments about the soap box derby car. I grew up in Ohio and of course this race was held in Dayton,Ohio and I so wanted to build a car. I mowed lawns, trimmed hedges and whatever I could to save enough to buy the wheels and kit that were the standard to build from. I never came up with enough to do it, but I do understand the desire to do that and be a competitor. I did build several go-karts as a young teen (by myself) and I still have fond memories of getting wheels under my butt. It was just plain fun.

-- Dr. Ken, Florida - Durch harte arbeit werden Träume wahr.

View stefang's profile

stefang

15512 posts in 2795 days


#15 posted 10-30-2014 09:12 AM

Thanks Roger and Ken. Unfortunately I missed out on the go-karts as they weren’t around while I was growing up. they must be a lot of fun to drive.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

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