LumberJocks

Destructive Testing my Homemade Liquid Hide Glue (cold hide glue)

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by stefang posted 07-22-2014 10:48 AM 1124 reads 2 times favorited 27 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I glued up these fir strips a couple of days ago for destructive testing of my homemade liquid hide glue. For those that don’t know, this glue stays in liquid form when cold and it is also used cold. It takes a lot longer than most glues to set and dry and it has to be clamped or in the case of veneers, pressed, but it can be a great option when you need a long open time and you are not in a big hurry. This product is hot hide glue with salt added. The recipe is in my last blog here. The strips were not planed or sanded smooth. I put different quantities of glue on each corner to get an idea of how much glue would be appropriate for the best result.

Here are the 4 corners glued up. This was glued up a couple of days ago. The photo sequence starts with the thickest spread glue progressing to the last with the thinnest spread. They all show that the wood fibers failed and not the glue, but the last two corners were best and that is where I spread the glue the thinnest. Not surprising, but nice to confirm in reality.

And lastly a pic of my little marquetry pencil pot put to work. I love projects that are useful!

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.



27 comments so far

View Jamie Speirs's profile

Jamie Speirs

4143 posts in 1521 days


#1 posted 07-22-2014 10:56 AM

Mike, did you try dynamite? :)
think “Myth Busters”

Jamie

-- Who is the happiest of men? He who values the merits of others, and in their pleasure takes joy, even as though 'twere his own. --Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

View stefang's profile

stefang

13101 posts in 1999 days


#2 posted 07-22-2014 11:05 AM

No Jamie, I’m saving that for my next failed project. I’m sure that won’t take long.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

7034 posts in 1968 days


#3 posted 07-22-2014 11:25 AM

good test mike, this is valuable…thanks for the recipe and the test…this glue may come in handy, i do have 2 cans of hide glue and used it back a long time ago when i made my work bench, it was my first time to use it and was a learning experience , as a side note, my oldest son went dip nettting in alaska, as this is where he lives now, and caught 55 red salmon…this is my oldest son who has never caught a fish before…lol..he was very happy and pretty whipped…so papa here will get some fish down the road and i hope soon, there going to hot and cold smoke some of it…i love them both, the cold smoke is called lox, its very tender abd has a flavor all its own…maybe you have tried it…if not…look for it in your local deli..see if they have any,,,it goes very well on a bagel with cream cheese a slice of onion and tomato are very good…now im hungry, time for breakfast…lol

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

11547 posts in 1770 days


#4 posted 07-22-2014 12:00 PM

Way to go mike. Testing is always good when using a new product!!...........Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View stefang's profile

stefang

13101 posts in 1999 days


#5 posted 07-22-2014 12:08 PM

Jim I’m really good at the destruction of wooden objects new or old.

Bob, the commercial liquid hide glues goes bad relatively quickly while mine can be inherited by my descendants due to it’s salt content, so check that old glue before you use it.

Good to hear that your son is enjoying life in Alaska. If he is an inexperienced fisherman and can catch 50 at a time, maybe there is still hope for me. My son takes a week away for some cold river fly fishing for salmon every year. I eat tons of smoked salmon and in fact I have it for lunch at least 4 times a week. The name for Salmon here is ‘laks’ which is pronounced ‘lox’, fishing for it is called ‘laksefiske’. This is not a coincidence. I sometimes use Philadelphia cream cheese with it, but usually a low calorie white cheese spread. I’m trying to keep our kitchen chairs from breaking down. Enjoy your meal!

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View SPalm's profile

SPalm

4826 posts in 2547 days


#6 posted 07-22-2014 12:25 PM

Interesting Mike. Funny how thin seems to be better.

Love the box that you put to work already. I really like to use stuff that I made. A year from now it will be interesting how it looks to you.

Take care,
Steve

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

View stefang's profile

stefang

13101 posts in 1999 days


#7 posted 07-22-2014 12:38 PM

Hi Steve, I’m guessing that there must be more friction the closer the wood parts are to each other, because the glue itself can’t be that strong. I enjoyed that little marquetry project so much that I’m all fired up now and I hope to do some more projects using my newfound skills real soon, probably the coming Fall, but sooner if I don’t get caught!. I’m currently trawling the net looking for suitable motifs.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

5000 posts in 1463 days


#8 posted 07-22-2014 02:41 PM

Good work Mike. You might try a mix with a little less salt as an experiment (since you are into experimenting). The reason is that you say you are using it cold. OBG is a gel at normal room temp and needs to be heated a little to become a liquid and it cures hard in 24 hours. Maybe you could get a shorter cure time.

For me, I have OBG for the times when I really need open time but as I always have the pot on, the decision is almost always HHG. Maybe I need to use hot cauls but I a just like the hot stuff for all of its “special” qualities.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View stefang's profile

stefang

13101 posts in 1999 days


#9 posted 07-22-2014 03:10 PM

I like that I don’t have to warm it up in hot water before use like OBG. I doubt I will be using it a lot, but we’ll see. I also tested it with some veneer on MDF, but I didn’t even try to pry that loose as it was so tightly bonded to the mdf that there wouldn’t have been anything left after destruction.

Like you Paul I don’t see myself using a lot of LHG now that I know that the alu platters can be warmed on the hot plate. I plan to get a couple as soon as the industry workers holiday is over and I’m back from Sweden. On the other hand, I can get pretty stressed during glue-ups at times (not marquetry work), and I wouldn’t mind waiting an extra 24 hours to avoid that. I work so slow that it probably wouldn’t matter that much anyway.

I am having fun with this as I don’t have enough time now to start up another project before we leave and it’s way too hot to work in the garden. I’m inside with the air conditioner on after mowing the lawn. I have never seen good weather like this in Norway before. It started in March and it’s been just beautiful all spring and summer. It’s over 86’F today and even warmer yesterday. Like my BIL said, “if this is global warming, bring it on”. That’s a translation of course.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View stefang's profile

stefang

13101 posts in 1999 days


#10 posted 07-22-2014 03:14 PM

dbl post

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

7034 posts in 1968 days


#11 posted 07-22-2014 03:21 PM

so a question of interest, does your wife speak english and what is the language of the house….just curious…

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View stefang's profile

stefang

13101 posts in 1999 days


#12 posted 07-22-2014 03:48 PM

Interesting question Bob. Our house is the tower of babble. I just use whatever word pops into my head whether it’s Norwegian or English. I vowed never to do that and here I am doing it anyway.

My wife speaks almost perfect American English and we were married and lived in the States for 10 years of our soon 48th year together. It seemed silly to switch languages when we moved to Norway and her English was (and is) a whole lot better than my Norwegian. We speak Norwegian with our in-laws, the grandkids, and everyone else, but English with our two sons (both of us).

I read Norwegian and English books and I can’t remember afterward what language they were written in. Many of those books were translated from English, but the Norwegian translators in general do a very good job with them. The only time I get to use pure English (my pure) is on the woodworking sites. That’s why I write way too much!

I have also learned the Norwegian names for a lot of stuff which I don’t know the English names for. I can often hardly understand what my grandkids are saying because they speak so quickly and slur their words like all kids do, and I’m a little hard of hearing. Luckily they have all learned English at school, but we never use it with them. I’m thinking of giving classes in Norglisk.

For anyone wanting to learn Norwegian they should be forewarned that there is no one Norwegian language. There is landsmål (which is based on Danish because the Danes ruled Norway for about 400 years) and nynorsk which is a modern thought up Norwegian language partly based on some dialects, and lastly there are different dialects which use entirely unique words and expressions that have nothing to do with the foregoing and of which there is a new one for about every 15 minutes of travel by car. This is not ideal for an eager student of Norwegian unless he stays in the same locality all the time.

To top it all off the written language is all based on the aforementioned landsmål or nynorsk which have little relation to the local dialects spoken. All this in a country with only about 5 mill. people. I may have exaggerated here a bit, but not that much! Let me know if you want to come here for language lessons.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

7034 posts in 1968 days


#13 posted 07-22-2014 04:14 PM

kan se hvordan dette overs gjør, jeg bare ønsker å se om dette arbeidet, eller hvis du sier det er andre måter å si ting, jeg vil ikke ønske å lære andre språk da hva jeg vet nå, og jeg ser ut til å gjøre det bra på snakker engelsk, så hvordan er dette.

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View stefang's profile

stefang

13101 posts in 1999 days


#14 posted 07-22-2014 04:57 PM

I can see you used Google Garble Bob. The words are all Norsk, but not necessarily in the right order or with proper phrasing, but it is a little better than hand signals. Well done as some of this would be understood by all Norwegians. It is nice that the whole world isn’t the same or it would be a pretty boring place. I have selected English for my computer language and it keeps correcting all of my American spelling! I hate that, but I’ve too lazy to see if I can use American English on it.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

5000 posts in 1463 days


#15 posted 07-22-2014 07:15 PM

So Mike, does that mean you use a vice to clamp pieces on your bench?

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

showing 1 through 15 of 27 comments

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase