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Blog entry by stefang posted 1230 days ago 2746 reads 0 times favorited 17 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Another short update from Mike’s inferno. I never was a math whiz and I still have problems dividing those darned willow branches. Maybe numbers are easier to work with after all.

I ran out of willow branches, having destroyed all but the one I successfully installed. I would harvest some more branches, but we still have a lot of snow and in fact it’s snowing pretty heavily right now. I know you aren’t reading this blog to get a weather report from Norway, but I need an excuse for the bucket delay. I had a nightmare last night that I was suffocating under a mountain of willow bark!

I thought that since the bucket building is in WOW status (don’t get excited, it means waiting on weather). I could show you a nice drawing of how the banding joint should be cut. I know you get it, but just in case someone doesn’t, the rounded lines represent where the carving is. Looks easy huh? After you ace this the first time you will understand why I consider myself challenged in the world of woodworking. I am much more clever with money, mainly in the area of spending it.

I was thinking it might be amusing to bury one of these buckets in a peat bog and when it’s found a 1,000 years from now and carbon dated to 2011, some fantasts will claim that the Vikings had mastered the art of time travel!

Well, I’ve run out of corn for today, so have a pleasant day wherever you are and try to remain patient. There will be an end to this project, .......................eventually.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.



17 comments so far

View patron's profile

patron

12955 posts in 1938 days


#1 posted 1230 days ago

i was cleaning the yard the other day
all the plastic and plastic buckets
were deteriorating
and breaking into little brittle pieces

yours may be the only bucket to survive this modern time

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View stefang's profile (online now)

stefang

12558 posts in 1931 days


#2 posted 1230 days ago

True David. I’m sure it will be in my family’s possession, and in the not too distant future a great grandson will say “See, these are the kind of buckets they used when my great grandfather was alive”.

It’s good to hear from you. How is your workshop project coming along? If I were in the States I would come out and help you build it. I love those kind of projects (although my back has a different opinion these days).

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View patron's profile

patron

12955 posts in 1938 days


#3 posted 1230 days ago

mine to mike
but the best remedy seems to be to ignore it
it’s cheaper than the doctors here
they don’t do a thing
but charge high prices

i use the saving to buy wood

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View daltxguy's profile

daltxguy

1373 posts in 2511 days


#4 posted 1230 days ago

I don’t wish to see an end to this project….
Thanks for the diagram. That helps to visualize it in a different way.
Just think, since it is heading towards spring there, your willow should be very supple and easy to split and debark, so time may be in your favor.

I am glad I am not having those nightmares…yet.

-- If you can't joint it, bead it!

View Dave's profile

Dave

11141 posts in 1437 days


#5 posted 1230 days ago

Mike the drawing is much better. The grain shows the story.
It looks like half a dovetail.;)

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View mafe's profile

mafe

9435 posts in 1686 days


#6 posted 1230 days ago

Hi Mike,
Suffocating under a mountain of willow bark, my God as if the snow was not enough.
Hope I will not be dreaming that I’m under a mountain of Popular Woodworking Magazine, lol.
I think we need more some time travel back to ask for help.
It’s a really nice drawing, but I fear much more to be dividing those branches of mine now…
Best of my thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1712 days


#7 posted 1230 days ago

Okay you winners lets travel back in time …. what periode shuold it bee lady´s and gentlemen
before the fire you say ….. are you mad …. there is no woodworking except maybee
a natural club
what ells can you come op with ? in the waiting time

Dennis

View stefang's profile (online now)

stefang

12558 posts in 1931 days


#8 posted 1230 days ago

David We have socialized medicine here (free), but they never seem able cure anything either. At least we don’t have to pay for the lack of results. I have the same philosophy as you, I just ignore it and work until all I can see is my shoes, then I hit my Lazyboy chair.

Steve Makes me feel good that you are enjoying the project. If I run out of willow branches I still have a Mountain Ash tree in the garden. After seeing the video on hurdle making I also read in my lagging book that Hazel is also a good binding material among others. Small world.

Dave It does have a slanted hook. Maybe a half-lap dovetail.

Mads I doubt you will experience the problems I’ve encountered. I am a guru of the learning through error method, but I don’t have many followers.

Dennis We could start a club club and call it Lumberclubs. The meetings would be….............interesting.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1712 days


#9 posted 1229 days ago

yah that wuold be very interesting speciel if we landed next to a Mamut with clubs in hand …... LOL

I don´t think its bad to have the bucket set up as in the picture for a while and settle a little before
you add the last willow rings

now I will see if I can come to the shop to today I was a little chocked yesterday not have seen or heard
anything the hole day before I loggen in and did see your post about Japan and now they seems to have to deal with a meltdown too we just have to hope they can do something with it so we don´t get a new tjernobyl

take care
Dennis

View Clung's profile

Clung

98 posts in 1378 days


#10 posted 1228 days ago

I too am suffering under a pile of willow bark, taking another go at it today. The splitting seems to work well for me, it’s a matter of pressure as to which hand pulls the split apart. But the joint and bending still have me struggling – lots of splits and breaks. I soaked some overnight and may try steaming today. Thanks for the drawings and instruction – hopefully eventually I’ll figure it out! Oh and your scenic snow pictures – that’s been my view for the last six months!

-- Clarence

View stefang's profile (online now)

stefang

12558 posts in 1931 days


#11 posted 1227 days ago

Hi Clarence. I’m sorry the poblem you’re having with the branches. However, I haven’t had any problem with the bending part so far, but I have messed quite a few up while cutting the joints.

However, I think I have the jointing down pretty well now, but I’ve run out of branches. I’m going to try and get some new ones today. I hope your willow branches are cut fresh and not all dried out.

I found that the secret to the bending is to plane each half down to an even thickness and to try and keep any outgrowth knots (shoots) oriented on the edges as much as possible. this will prevent breakage at those positions later while you work it around the post. I probably forgot to mention this in my blog.

As you can see from the blogs I first planed down the half round to get rid of the pith and the groove and the groove the pith sits in. Then I checked the profile to find any thick spots. I then thinned these with my camp knife to get an overall even thickness.

I started the softening process with just one short end with my one hand choked up on the long end to make a small loop. I worked this carefully at first. I could feel that there were still some thick areas, and I thinned these out as I went, using my camp knife.

As the sections of the band became softer, I worked the area more vigorously until they became supple, then I lengthened the loop gradually as I worked it back and forth against the post until the whole length had been worked and the band could then be bent without the danger of breaking.

I thought beforehand that the banding would be the most difficult part to master. I also thing it adds the most to the project, so it is a skill well worth learning. I am just going to continue until I’ve learned all the little details necessary to get a good band. I think I’m close. I have set to properly split a band properly, but that’s not a big problem, as I can afford to waste the bad half. I expect that I can produce a good band now after having learned the joiniting. I just need some branches to finish . I hope this above explanations will help you with your struggle. Good luck!

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Clung's profile

Clung

98 posts in 1378 days


#12 posted 1227 days ago

Thanks for the ideas stefang – I wasn’t planing them down – just working them as they split. That makes a lot of sense, as they were uneven and the different thicknesses were causing grief. Rereading your blog 22 shows me my mistake – I must have missed that part or forgotten it! The willow is fresh cut, although we are still weeks away from any buds. But I’ll keep at it – I want to get it right! Thanks again!

-- Clarence

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14587 posts in 2273 days


#13 posted 1222 days ago

Mike, I have been following the trials and tribulations here with the willows. I am a bit behind. I think I will slightly taper the staves to add a bit of style, then skip the binding. That will leave a lot more area for my mom to rosemall. Is that a cop out or what? :-)

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View stefang's profile (online now)

stefang

12558 posts in 1931 days


#14 posted 1221 days ago

Hi Bob. If you taper the stave’s the bucket will of course have a wider bottom or top depending on which end you taper. No, I don’t think leaving out the banding is a cop-out. I am guessing you will be gluing the stave’s then. I’m glad that you have shown an interest in the project and are making the bucket in a way that pleases you. This project is for learning some ancient skills in the name of enjoyment. How you choose to do it is entirely up to you. Just glad you are participating.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14587 posts in 2273 days


#15 posted 1221 days ago

I am thinking a bit wider at the top, but that does intorduce a whole new problem of a variable diameter on the inside ;-) The outside will be esier to round off. Yes, gluing them is what I am thinking.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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