LumberJocks

-

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by stefang posted 03-05-2011 08:54 PM 2534 reads 0 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Just a little update to let my fellow participants know that I’m still alive. I do apologize for the delay. I had some dental problems and among other things I finally had to get a tooth yanked out, so I haven’t been doing much lately. I got into the shop today for the first time in quite awhile. I finished perfecting the edge angles on the stave’s that weren’t quite right and I got all the dowels finished up and installed. I managed to drill one stave wrong and so I have to make a new one, but no big deal.

After making the dowels, I put them in a Jacobs chuck (drill chuck) mounted in the lathe to thin them out in the middle as I showed you in the last blog. The purpose is to allow some swelling room in the center of the dowels between the stave’s so the dowels won’t break when the bucket is filled with water. the chuck is a hand tightened one, so it went pretty fast, taking about 10 minutes for 50 dowels. I have some mini lathe tools, and I used the round nosed scraper from this set to make the cove in the middle of each dowel. They are only slightly longer than 3/4”, so it was a ‘tiny turning’ project. Here is a photo which shows the finished dowels. Didn’t really need the pic, but I hate blogs without photo’s!

I clamped the bucket together with the dowels and the bottom installed and everything looks good now. I just have to replace the one ruined stave, cut the stave’s to the same length (except the two long ones) and then I plan to do the bindings and the handle. I’m hoping to be finished by this coming Wednesday, and I will be blogging the work. I do expect some problems with the binding work, so It may take a little longer than I expect.

I hope all the other participants are at about the same point now, so we can have a fun finish to the project with everyone blogging their results or at least letting us know how they are getting along.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.



12 comments so far

View daltxguy's profile

daltxguy

1373 posts in 2668 days


#1 posted 03-05-2011 10:04 PM

Mike – good to hear from you again. Sorry to hear about the tooth problems. I’ve been there, I know how uncomfortable that can make things. Glad you are back in action.

I will be catching up with the staves shortly. I have some outdoor work to do before the cold starts setting in, insulation and painting, so I haven’t been in the shop either since I finished the tools ( well apart from finishing a few projects which were getting in the way in the shop and some carpentry and interior finishing work which is just part of the renovations).

Do you think the dowels in the staves ( and the floor of the bucket) are there to actually tighten the staves when the bucket is holding water or was it used just as a way of aligning the staves?

-- If you can't joint it, bead it!

View stefang's profile

stefang

13633 posts in 2088 days


#2 posted 03-05-2011 10:49 PM

Hi Steve. I think the dowels were used as an aid to assembling the bucket and aligning the stave’s as you said. (I aligned using the inside edge of the stave’s as a reference). The dowels might also add some overall strength. Liquid is pretty heavy and I suspect it puts a lot of strain on the buckets structure, especially with the swelling that takes place (just a guess).

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

15090 posts in 2430 days


#3 posted 03-06-2011 12:04 AM

I have been wondering what happened. Good to hear it was a minor issue. I am getting a little gun shy and nervous after taking 3 of the guys off my shooting match mailing list this last month ;-((

I need to get caught up; hopeful tomorrow. Making firewood today. Have had neurologist try a couple of new ideas for migraine prevention. He onlny made it worse, I seem to be nearly back to normal today ;-))

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1869 days


#4 posted 03-06-2011 12:07 AM

good to see you are back in the shop Mike :-)
Rand discovered that I did tightened several projects type nicely together in my last blog
about the Viking´s if they visit the Roskilde Vikinge Museum site
take care
Dennis

View Dave's profile

Dave

11205 posts in 1594 days


#5 posted 03-06-2011 12:33 AM

Hello Mike, Glad to see you back in the shop. And progress on the bucket.
My Dad had a ole cure for a sore tooth. A fifth of bourbon. He would start drinking and either the tooth would stop hurting or he would pass out. ;)
Worked for him
waiting on the outcome of your project.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View lilredweldingrod's profile

lilredweldingrod

2495 posts in 1861 days


#6 posted 03-06-2011 12:50 AM

Mike, sorry to hear about the dental problems. I hope you are back up to snuff.

Dennis turned us on to some videos of a museum building a Viking long boat with only the old tools and methods.`Teh were splitting the tree for the planks and using these beautiful old wooden planes. They showed us how they made the pitch for the sealing and lo and behold….There was your wooden bucket full of pitch. Great stuff. All the old axes, planes, draw knives, clamps and your bucket.
I haven’t been able to build along with you on the bucket, but I have been following you and Mafe on yours. Thank you for all the tutorials and the idea of doing this.

View mafe's profile

mafe

9693 posts in 1843 days


#7 posted 03-06-2011 01:13 AM

Hi Mike,
I’m still so impatient… Laugh.
No I have spend my time on giving my body some strenghts, and then working on this gift for you, and a few other small things here.
I look so much forward to make this binding, but think also I have to make some adjusting on the staves after the drilling if I want it to hold water after.
It was wonderful to see the video, and I was so surprised to see he had one of these long planes that they used in France also, but perhaps the French learned from Skandinavia, they have a plane they call a Stockholm plane for barrel making.
Glad to hear you are back (even I did check on you as you know).
Best of my thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

15090 posts in 2430 days


#8 posted 03-06-2011 01:28 AM

superdav721 Maybe I should try that for migraines? not sure what a gallon a day would do to my liver ? :-)

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Dave's profile

Dave

11205 posts in 1594 days


#9 posted 03-06-2011 01:42 AM

TopamaxSurvivor I know where you can get a very well made bucket to hold said amount of bourbon.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

15090 posts in 2430 days


#10 posted 03-06-2011 02:06 AM

I’m hoping mine won’t leak.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View stefang's profile

stefang

13633 posts in 2088 days


#11 posted 03-06-2011 01:19 PM

Bob Sorry to hear about your problems with migraines. My wife suffered terribly for many years with migraines . She tried lots of different meds, but the only thing that ever worked for her was two aspirins and a Valium, prescribed by her doctor, sometimes two Valiums when necessary. She never became addicted to Valium, and she stopped using it about 10 years ago when the migraines stopped, but addiction is always a potential problem. I read in some health news that scientists have linked migraines to a defective gene. My younger son is also plagued with migraines. In his case the only thing that works for him is medicine used to lower blood pressure. I get migraines too, pretty frequently, with the flashing lights and impaired vision, but they go over in about 20 minutes and leave only a slight dull headache so I don’t take anything for it, so I’m pretty lucky, but I do understand what a debilitating affliction migraines can be. I sincerely hope you get some relief from this Bob.

Dennis I will read your blog with interest. I saw some photos or films from Denmark showing the building of some Viking ships using the original methods and tools. It’s probably related to the stuff in your blog. Very cool to see. I was amazed at how efficient they worked, and I assume they were even more proficient with their tools back in Viking times.

Dave A good idea. The bourbon doesn’t take away the pain, but if you drink enough you don’t care about it, lol. I hope you weren’t thinking of putting bourbon in one of our buckets. I expect mine to leak like a sieve and I wouldn’t want to waste anything!

Rand Glad you are following the project. I think most of us woodworkers are interested in how things were done before our time, even if we don’t try to do it ourselves.

Mads Yes my impatient friend, the film was quite interesting and it was fun to watch how efficiently things can be made using with such modest tools, and all hand powered too. It was very kind of Houtje to send us the link. The plane used is called a ‘fjeldsky’ (mountain ski) in Norway. I did find that my jack plane mounted upside down in my bench worked just as well though.

Working mainly with hand tools is certainly pleasant. I have found myself using hand tools more often as my skill increases with them. They are often the most efficient tool for the job. I am very grateful for the machine tools though. they sure make life easier for me, and they allow me to do things that I just don’t have the energy to do by hand anymore.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

15090 posts in 2430 days


#12 posted 03-07-2011 01:51 AM

Mike, Glad your wife got out of the woods on them!! They are supposed to be hereditary but no one in my lineage has ever had them except my sister. Yellow cheese and dark chocolate are her triggers. Mine are from eye glass prescriptions, light and a neck injury by a chiropractor. I think my cataract implants may be a permanent trigger. All I know for sure is one of the best researchers in Seattle at Swedish told me I had the most extensive migraine diaries she had ever seen in over 5,000 research patients and there was nothing she could do for me. I have pinned down the triggers an avoid them if possible. Right now I am recording humidity and air pressure because of an annual cycle that seems to be appearing now that the pain is low enough to tell differences in them daily. All the other drs have just made them worse, except for the pain control guy. Don’t feel bad about me, think of all the poor guys with cancer and other dread diseases or are homeless. I just have a minor inconvenience to deal with!

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase