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Blog entry by stefang posted 1282 days ago 909 reads 0 times favorited 18 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Another short progress report today. I finished rounding the stave’s on the outside using my spokeshave. This was nice to use because I could sit down while doing the work. I wouldn’t have been able to do that if I used my plane. A good enough reason for some folks to buy a spokeshave.

Here is my spokeshave set-up. I have two spokeshaves, one with a flat sole as seen here and another with a rounded sole for inside curves, like for cabriolet legs and such. I have had these shaves about 30 years. I know they look brand new, but I haven’t really used them much. But when I do they are wonderful to work with. A few years ago I read an article in FWW mag., I think by Garret Hack showing how to tune them up for optimal performance. I did this and they perform beautifully now.

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The following photos show my bucket temporarily put together. I still have to perfect a few edge angles, shape the handle Stave’s and drill holes in them and make a handle before doing the bindings. So I will take my time to do those edge tune-ups tomorrow or maybe Wednesday if I can’t get into the shop tomorrow.

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TAKING TIME TO SMELL THE ROSES

During this project I have heard few comments to our group’s blogs about needing a lot of patience to do this work. I just wanted to say that often we woodworkers get very excited about what what we are making and we can’t wait to get it finished, so we push our wood through our machines making a lot of noise and dust and sometimes wearing ourselves out to get our project finished.

I feel that sometimes we are so focused on getting the work done that we forget to enjoy the work process. Doing a project mainly with hand tools occasionally is a very nice way to do that. it’s relaxing, quiet and dust free work and the slower work pace gives you a chance to think about improvements you might make to your project before the next step.

I would be the last person to give up my beloved machine tools, but this project has been very enjoyable so far, partly for the reasons given above and also sharing the experience with the others who are participating in this project and I don’t regret the slower pace. We amateurs are after all doing this type of work because we like it and we set our own deadlines (or sometimes the wives do).

Thanks for reading!

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.



18 comments so far

View Tim Dahn's profile

Tim Dahn

1467 posts in 2189 days


#1 posted 1282 days ago

I’m with you on the slower pace, quiet, dust free, I do enjoy working with hand tools more. Following you on this project has been enjoyable too.

-- Good judgement comes from experience and experience comes from poor judgement.

View Clung's profile

Clung

98 posts in 1405 days


#2 posted 1282 days ago

Very nicely done. I’m with you on the hand tools – I also used a spokeshave to round the outside, and find the pace very relaxing – even meditative. It’s been a great project!

-- Clarence

View stefang's profile

stefang

12860 posts in 1958 days


#3 posted 1282 days ago

Thanks Tim and Clarence. I guess the work ethic and being productive is drummed into us from childhood, so it’s easy to forget to take a little extra time to enjoy ourselves sometimes. I just wanted to remind others not to forget to give themselves a break once in a while.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View mafe's profile (online now)

mafe

9480 posts in 1713 days


#4 posted 1282 days ago

Hi Mike,
And it has been a pleasure to be a part of this!
Happy valentines day to rhe wifes.
Yes it’’s a pleasure to work slow and enjoy on this project, even I have cheated once in a while to be kind to my arms.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View stefang's profile

stefang

12860 posts in 1958 days


#5 posted 1282 days ago

Hi Mads, I have cheated too. I used my bandsaw to cut the bottom round, my cordless drill for the dowel holes and I cut all the stave lengtha with my miter saw. I didn’t feel a need to be authentic with the saw and drilling work. Everything else has been done with hand tools.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View mafe's profile (online now)

mafe

9480 posts in 1713 days


#6 posted 1282 days ago

We are a real couple of gangsters! lol.
I try to do things by hand to see if I can, and then I cheat after. Also I take care of my health so I have to make the repetitive things by machine.
Todays progress:
http://lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/21314
Best thoughts,
mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Dave's profile

Dave

11149 posts in 1464 days


#7 posted 1282 days ago

Mike I agree with the rush rush. I have been very guilty of it. With my house [circa 1880], maintenance on cars, three teenage daughters, and a whole farms worth of animals to tend to. I have been rushing on my projects. I have been working on one of the last old planes that I have just bought. I took it back apart and have decided to do it the right way. This is my hobby and the only person I have to please is me. If we don’t do our tool maintenance what will we have to work with. We live in such a through away society. Lets build that bucket that will last for 50 years. Good progress.
We are not cheaters were just hybrid woodworkers.
That goes for you to Mafe and all others that are enjoying the lesson in bucket making.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View daltxguy's profile

daltxguy

1373 posts in 2538 days


#8 posted 1282 days ago

I am also a hybrid woodworker but with too many machines around, I think we often forget that a handtool is also a valid choice for the job. The machine is not always faster. Some things are way too complicated to set up on the power tool, when a handtool will do the job in just a few minutes.

So, I might add this to your thoughts – sometimes the fastest way to complete a project IS with hand tools. Since we are losing this knowledge, we also lose the understanding of how useful handtools are and we go to incredible lengths to set up the same operation with a machine.

I once watched a you-tube video with a young chap in it who needed to cut a 3” piece of 1×2. I laughed when he secured the piece in a vise and then proceeded to cut off the 3 inches with a reciprocating saw. 3 strokes with a handsaw would have done it.

This project is about the process and the lessons learned along the way (mistakes?) and the old ways remembered, rehashed, rediscussed and (perhaps) refined. The “hard way” confines the lessons to memory and helps us to remember or rediscover why things were done the way they were. The bucket is actually quite secondary.

Yes, there is an object at the end, but I think if you rush to only have the object, you have missed the lesson!

-- If you can't joint it, bead it!

View ShopTinker's profile

ShopTinker

876 posts in 1392 days


#9 posted 1282 days ago

Thanks for sharing with us. This has been a great project.

-- Dan - Valparaiso, Indiana, "A smart man changes his mind, a fool never does."

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14721 posts in 2300 days


#10 posted 1282 days ago

When did you put dowel in Mike? Guess I missed that one, eh?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View stefang's profile

stefang

12860 posts in 1958 days


#11 posted 1282 days ago

Great comments everyone! I agree with everything said here. And you are so right Steve that often hand tools are the quickest way. For example, now that I’ve gotten better with hand planes over the last few years, I very often use one when I don’t have a whole pile of wood to plane. The key to being able to do this with any hand tool is having reached a skill level where you are comfortable doing it. Self confidence comes with practice, so these hand tool projects once in a while are very useful to hone one’s skills.

Bob Dowels were drilled on the first step of the bucket to connect the bottom boards. I haven’t done the dowels between the stave’s yet. I want to perfect the angles first for the tightest fit I can get. I will probably get them leak free and then the bottom will leak like a sieve! At least that’s what I’m expecting, lol. I don’t expect that dowel drilling to be easy or even go particularly good. It is nitty picky work, so stay tuned for an exciting and challenging blog chapter!

I am particularly happy to hear that you guys participating in this project are enjoying it. I wish I could have given a better overview of the project before we started, but I just wasn’t prepared to write a whole book. So I know it’s a little like working in the dark. All the more reason to thank you joining me on this project and trusting me to give you good enough info to either do it my way (the book’s way actually) or to find a way to do it that you like better.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View mafe's profile (online now)

mafe

9480 posts in 1713 days


#12 posted 1281 days ago

Dear Mike,
You do have my 100% trust.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1739 days


#13 posted 1281 days ago

I know I´m little late here Mike :-) as usual at the moment but I do enjoy the slow speed
since I have a chance to catch up with the reading ,enjoying to follow every step on the blogs
at the sideline for the moment , the last few weeks have been a little hectic for me with work,
using Citric acid as rustremover 75 items sofare all from sawblades to small screws on planes
and two times in Århus with my doughter at a specielist dentist ,just arived tonight from the last trip
and they say vacation is relaxing time …..LOL
and in the waiting time between the visit to the acid I started a tiny recycleproject using my
japanese saw even though I can´t be fammeliar with the short length the blade has when taking strokes
I do enjoy every second doing it without the loud noice from either the skillsaw or the jiigsaw.

another well written blog from you Mike :-)

take care
Dennis

View stefang's profile

stefang

12860 posts in 1958 days


#14 posted 1281 days ago

Good going Dennis. You are getting into the spirit of the project if not the actual building. I have used citric acid to clean silver (maybe not so smart?), but never to remove rust. I’ll have to try it if I can find anything rusty to use it on.

I often wished I lived in a larger community where it was possible to buy used tools. They just don’t exist anywhere near to where I live. No newspaper adds for them. No Ebay or Craigslist local items. Nothing. Any used tools I want to buy have to be imported and then I have to pay 25% added value tax plus import handling fees, plus high freight/ postage costs. I love Norway, but it is definitely not a tool man’s paradise. Sad hearing a grown man cry, isn’t it?

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1739 days


#15 posted 1280 days ago

Mike I have found out that for newer rust the Citric is fantasstic to it
but when it comes to very old and thick rust you have to help the acid but it will do the job
when you see black gum in the small holes and like a little ruogh landscape in small places on
the iron it is rust but something has done it very hard and is very difficult for the acid to penetrate it
Citric acid is one of the mildes form of acid there is maybee thats why .
but you can read all about it in the blog I made about using Citric acid as rust remover
http://lumberjocks.com/Dennisgrosen/blog/21230

http://lumberjocks.com/Dennisgrosen/blog/21248

I have just cleaned one plane that had some heavy flash rust it did take be about ½hour
and I was finished with it , still need to sharpen and take care of the wooden body

and yes its deffently hartbreaking to hear a man cry the same do I every time my small packages
is cought in the costum when I get something from USA speciel first time when I had ordred
two DVD from Lie-Neilsen about making sideescapements planes and using them Larry Williams
and his partner have made before I knew it they wanted me to pay severel hundres Kr. more for them :-(

hey great you make me think on them I have to ordre the last two they have made about it

have a great day both you and your wife

take care
Dennis

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