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Blog entry by stefang posted 02-07-2011 08:02 PM 811 reads 0 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Just a short blog today to tell you what I’ve learned and to give you a few tips. Today I planed 6 stave’s concave and also cut out the dados in them for the bottom. As I mentioned in a past blog, it is easy to cut the lines marked out for the dado.

I first scored with a knife. It’s a good idea to just lightly score the lines much like the pressure you might use on a pencil, then cut deeper the 2nd time. This will keep you from wandering off the line on the first cut.


After that it’s using the lag knife. It is amazingly easy to use and you can get a lot of pressure on it with the long handle. You just have to be a little careful at the sharp outside edges of the staves so you don’t break them out.

The photo below shows me starting to chisel out the waste. Here again you need to be a little careful with the edges. I started the cut with the bevel up and then reversed it to bevel down about a third of the way into the cut. This makes it easier to follow the curve of the stave evenly. If you should take a chip from the edge, it will likely be near the inside edge which will be planed away when you plane the edge angles. I am doing the edge angles last for that reason.

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Here is the first one finished.

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And here it is with the bottom inserted.

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And with a few staves set up. Please note that I have put the long handle stave’s at one end of the middle board and the other will be at the other end directly opposite. this will be the strongest way to mount the handle stave’s to reduce stress on the bucket bottom and structure when it’s filled with liquid.

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One last point. I originally ground my plane iron to the same radius as the stave’s would be. In retrospect that was a mistake, although it worked ok, I still felt it wasn’t optimal so I reground my blade to a tighter radius and that made a significant difference. Better control, Faster and better. I’m sorry I miss-led you on this point and I hope it won’t create too much work for you if you choose to regrind and hone your plane iron.

I hope everyone participating in this project is having fun and learning something new, as I am. Thanks for reading.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.



9 comments so far

View mafe's profile

mafe

9668 posts in 1833 days


#1 posted 02-07-2011 08:19 PM

Hi Mike,
looking good!
I look forward to try to use that lag knife.
Cant stop to admire your mallet!
I think also the blade will be a easier use if it’s sharpened a little more like a scrub plane, I found mine swimming a little on the wood when I planed, but I took the blade out a little extra.
Thank you for sharing the day,
best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View mafe's profile

mafe

9668 posts in 1833 days


#2 posted 02-07-2011 08:20 PM

Ohhh yes one question, did they not make some kind of wedge effect on the bottom to secure a tight fit?

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View stefang's profile

stefang

13623 posts in 2078 days


#3 posted 02-07-2011 09:06 PM

Hi Mads, no wedge shape in my book on the subject. I imagine when it gets filled with water it will expand quite a lot and seal the bottom pretty tight (I hope). I think just a reasonably good fit between the dado and the bottom should do the trick.

I do think the coopering method is smarter/better where the edge of the bottom is wedge shaped and it fits a matching ‘V’ groove. There were quite a few coopering projects in the gold book I wouldn’t mind trying out.

I really enjoyed the work today and I was very pleased with the results. Unlike yourself, I’m not thinking much about the aesthetics. I will just be happy to get it together properly and I hope without leaks as a bonus!

Even with all my big machines, I must admit that this way of working is much more satisfying and enjoyable. No big noise or dust clouds and a nice work pace. I was planning to do this project quite a few years ago. I only got the plane finished, the little one you saw in the photo, but I never got any further. I’m glad I didn’t though as it is more fun doing it as a group like we are now. Now I just have to explain to my wife why I spent all that money over the years on all those machines!

I don’t envy you doing those edge angles by eye, but if anybody can do it, I know you can. So good luck with it and it will be interesting hear how it went for you.

I do think it would be easier to do it by eye if you mark up the angle your eye tells you that you need, then follow those marks as you free hand plane. That would make more sense to me than just to start planing an trying to eye in the angle.

My concern here is that the stave width has to be consistent from top to bottom. In theory you could get the angle right but remove more wood at one end than the other. This would affect the tightness of the joint between the stave’s.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View dub560's profile

dub560

606 posts in 1657 days


#4 posted 02-07-2011 09:14 PM

looking real good bro

-- Life is enjoyable especially when you borrow from people

View stefang's profile

stefang

13623 posts in 2078 days


#5 posted 02-07-2011 10:42 PM

Thanks dub. It is actually a lot easier to do than I thought it would be. Not that the quality is so great on this first one.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Dave's profile

Dave

11205 posts in 1584 days


#6 posted 02-08-2011 05:01 AM

QC on the prototype is always hard. But I bet bet once you get your tools tweaked it will be raining buckets. And ma-bee you’ll catch some of that rain.
As for the handwork. The tool-set is much smaller. 4 good planes will do the work of thousands of dollars of machines.
The setup is much faster and easier.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View mafe's profile

mafe

9668 posts in 1833 days


#7 posted 02-08-2011 10:26 AM

Look at this:
http://cgi.ebay.fr/outils-anciens-mesurer-cuir-Bourrelier-/180620980948?pt=FR_JG_Collections_Sciences&hash=item2a0dd972d4
Could it be the tool we were looking at?
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View stefang's profile

stefang

13623 posts in 2078 days


#8 posted 02-08-2011 12:50 PM

Dave So true. I do love the machine’s for what they can do so effortlessly. However, I have said many times that if I were young I wouldn’t mind using just hand tools. It took me years to become a little familiar with hand planes, but now I use them a lot for small jobs and the work is very satisfying. I also love to use my spoke shaves. quiet woodworking is wonderful. The only downside is that it takes some time to become proficient with hand tools.

Mads That’s a great tool, but I think the ones pictured must be for coopering which is a much newer technology than our method. There could well have been something used for lagging similar to your version. I have tried to believe that it was done by eye, but considering all the different widths and angles involved I still think they needed a little help. The master coopers sure did, so why not the master laggers too?

I’m hoping to finish my stave’s today and maybe even drill and install the dowels if all goes well. I can’t wait to get to the bindings. They’re my favorite part of these old buckets, but I think it will be a bit of a challenge to make them properly.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1859 days


#9 posted 02-09-2011 12:05 AM

Great blog´s once again Mike
I´m just catching up since the last four days from friday to monday has been realy tuff
friday and saturday on nightshift 15hours a day and sonday morning directly with the ferry
and train to århus to my mother since my daughter shuold visit a dentist specialist monday
were we returned home late in the evening
I used alot of the sonday evening to cut the planes loose from the frame I showed as a teaser
in my last bragging gloat :-) I got 2/3 of the tools with me home :-) crazy 46kg waighted the bag with tools

take care
Dennis

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