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Blog entry by stefang posted 1284 days ago 1273 reads 6 times favorited 23 comments Add to Favorites Watch

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-- Mike, an American living in Norway.



23 comments so far

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1718 days


#1 posted 1284 days ago

great blog and picturebook as usual from you :-)

looking forward tothe next installment

take care
Dennis

View canadianchips's profile

canadianchips

1831 posts in 1600 days


#2 posted 1284 days ago

You doing a very good job of explaining and pictures. I am very interested in hand planes, maybe one day I will try one myself.
Thanks !

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

View daltxguy's profile

daltxguy

1373 posts in 2517 days


#3 posted 1284 days ago

Mike, thanks for this, I will scrounge for some appropriate material.

Step 9:
When sizing the opening, you use the blade and the sole. I notice your blade is already rounded. I’m assuming that if this is not the case, then you still size the opening the same way and make sure the flat end of the blade comes within 1/16” of the bottom of the sole? and if it already rounded, then you add 1/16” to the closest part of the blade to the sole? I guess this is obvious but I just wanted to make sure since many of us might not have the blade rounded yet ( since it has not been covered yet :)

-- If you can't joint it, bead it!

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14613 posts in 2279 days


#4 posted 1284 days ago

Another awesome blog Mike! I may be an enlightened purist flip flopping as time allows ;-))

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View BigTiny's profile

BigTiny

1664 posts in 1492 days


#5 posted 1284 days ago

Hi Mike.

Wouldn’t it make more sense to drill the dowel holes before cutting the cheeks off the body, thus ensuring perfect alignment?

-- The nicer the nice, the higher the price!

View Houtje's profile

Houtje

299 posts in 1575 days


#6 posted 1284 days ago

Hi,
That’s a great blog…
Thanks for sharing it.

View daltxguy's profile

daltxguy

1373 posts in 2517 days


#7 posted 1284 days ago

Big Tiny – that would only work for the back half, since the front half has to be moved to create the plane opening but it sounds like a 1/2 good idea to me :)

-- If you can't joint it, bead it!

View stefang's profile

stefang

12597 posts in 1937 days


#8 posted 1284 days ago

Thanks for the supportive comments everyone. I find it difficult to be short and concise and I’m always worried about going overboad with the text part.

Steve This was an excellent question. On my test sole, I just put the tip at the 1/16” line, and this worked fine, but the front of the opening on the sole has to be reworked later (rounded) to fit the curve of the blade and to provide an even opening with enough room for the chips to come through, but still small enough to allow for fine cuts. I haven’t yet worked out a sure-fire way to do this rounding. I just took it a little at a time. I will show you how I did this in the following blog, but I admit, there must be a better and more accurate way to do this.

Big Tiny Steve is right. The front body will be shifted to the front relative to the cheek to provide a throat opening.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14613 posts in 2279 days


#9 posted 1284 days ago

Mike do you know the radius of the staves yet?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View stefang's profile

stefang

12597 posts in 1937 days


#10 posted 1284 days ago

Hi Bob, No I haven’t worked out exact measurements yet. I have the measurements in centimeters, but I can’t convert them directly as this will lead to a lot of odd fractions of inches. However, the radius of the stave’s will be the same radius as the inside bottom.

To clarify, the bottom will have to different radii. The inner radii for the inside bottom and the outside radii which will be inserted into the groove at the bottom of the stave’s.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View BigTiny's profile

BigTiny

1664 posts in 1492 days


#11 posted 1284 days ago

If you cut the front and back a little apart, the mouth gap is formed while keeping the alignment the same. This is the method shown in most articles I’ve read on the subject.

Not trying to be argumentative, just offering an optional method that might be a little more accurate..

-- The nicer the nice, the higher the price!

View stefang's profile

stefang

12597 posts in 1937 days


#12 posted 1284 days ago

True enough BigTiny, but as you can see from blog, the mouth opening is determined by a combination of plane iron projection and sole thickness. This method is easy to do without measuring and/or calculating. Drilling and putting the dowels in took about 10 minutes altogether, which I consider a reasonable amount of extra work to insure accuracy. That said, I fully realize that there is always more than one way to skin a cat.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View mafe's profile

mafe

9456 posts in 1692 days


#13 posted 1284 days ago

Hi Mike,
Looking good, you have done a fantastic job on the blog here, thank you.
Few questions from me also… Sorry.
Are there any reason for the sole, cant it just be the same wood?
What about this problem we spoke of, that the moth would get more open in the sides if we did not change the layout… The plane I see in the background, is that one you allready made? Did this one show it was so little that it was not any problem?
Ok I’ll shut up… lol.
Can’t wait, to get started, always dreamed of making me a plane.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View stefang's profile

stefang

12597 posts in 1937 days


#14 posted 1284 days ago

Good questions Mads. You have a plane body that includes the sole. To do this you will have to have a way of making an accurate mouth (throat from now on). Chiseling a hole out at an angle accurately and smoothly is certainly possible, but not easy unless you do it all the time.

The other alternative would be to cut the plane workpiece in half and then saw the angles and chisel out the waste between the cheeks (multiple saw cuts down to the inside cheek sides would help here). This is what I did with the smaller plane. You could then also cut the throat opening and then glue the two halves together again. I didn’t show this way, because it somewhat limits the wood you can use for the plane body, which might be suitable for the body, but not hard enough for the sole. Birch would would be a good choice for this type of construction with it’s tight grain which will work well under compression during use without wearing quickly.

I will warn you though that when I made the other plane many years ago, I had a devil of a time getting the throat opening right. In the end I just glued in a new piece in the bottom to get it rounded to somewhat match the blade. I have never built the plane in this blog, but I do think it is much easier to build it accurately, and I’m certain that will also affect it’s performance.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Roz's profile

Roz

1658 posts in 2390 days


#15 posted 1283 days ago

Great instruction, makes it all seem simple and clearly demonstrates for me how a plane works.

-- Terry Roswell, L.A. (Lower Alabama) "Life is what happens to you when you are making other plans."

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