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Blog entry by stefang posted 01-16-2011 10:30 PM 1407 reads 1 time favorited 36 comments Add to Favorites Watch

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-- Mike, an American living in Norway.



36 comments so far

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1782 days


#1 posted 01-16-2011 11:13 PM

great blog Mike :-)
can you give the radius on the plane bottom now ….just curios to see if
I can convert an old germanstile jackplane to it :-)

and thank´s for the last drawing of the different stile

take care
Dennis

View stefang's profile

stefang

13104 posts in 2001 days


#2 posted 01-16-2011 11:21 PM

Good question Dennis. I will get an idea tomorrow and send you a PM. One thing to be aware of is that if you round the bottom of an existing plane you will probably get a too big opening (mouth).

If it has an adjustable opening, then I assume that this wouldn’t be a problem. If the mouth is too open, you will get over thick shavings, chatter and loose control of the cuts.

Rounding an existing wood plane is also suggested as an option by author of the book I’m using, but I’m not sure he thought through the consequences.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1782 days


#3 posted 01-16-2011 11:31 PM

maybee It shuold be a worn smoothing plane thats already have a fine mouth
but I did see Tommy on the rough cut show converted an english jack or panel plane to it
when he made his copy of the old bombsecretair furniture
so it shuold be possiple and if you think of the moulding plane´s they also open op the mouth
the longer you get from the bottom thats why the the english and amercan moulding
planes is made so you have to angle them in use

Dennis

View Flemming's profile

Flemming

417 posts in 1563 days


#4 posted 01-17-2011 12:04 AM

i’ve been waiting for this blog all day, lol. i always get too excited and a little too far ahead of myself…
for once i’m going to take some advice to heart. i will join you on the pine adventure mike. the oak will wait until i have a few more notches on the belt.
i am off on a snowboarding extravaganza with some buddies in the last week of this month, so i wont be able to do much that week, but i think i can manage to catch up when i get back :)
one thing that is very interesting to me is how the wooden bands are made… i know how metal bands are made, and the process is probably very similar.. but i’ve been wrong before and i cant find any information about wooden bands on the internet. (cant find johann hopstads book either, lol)... it really does seem to be a lost art you’ve conjured up here :)
i’m excited for this project to say the least :)

-- Flemming. It's only a mistake if you can't fix it.

View stefang's profile

stefang

13104 posts in 2001 days


#5 posted 01-17-2011 12:33 AM

Thanks for your positive comments Flemming. The bands are fairly simple, but quite clever. They are a little difficult to install though. I plan to do a blog on it, so all will be revealed. I have to address each step in order to avoid confusion. The book has an ISBN no. 82-529-1096-3 published by a/s Landbruksforlaget in Norway. First issue 1985 and 2nd issue 1990. You might try to find it with this info on the net. I have the 1990 version.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View mafe's profile

mafe

9550 posts in 1756 days


#6 posted 01-17-2011 12:24 PM

I’m in some pine is affordable, and I have some so I’m ready by now.

I just recently purchased two old handdrills and a load of drill bitts 59 (25 dollar quite fair I think), so will follow your advice not to go over the top. And use this project as a excuse to restore of this set, and then use it for the project.
Best thoughts,
mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View stefang's profile

stefang

13104 posts in 2001 days


#7 posted 01-17-2011 01:33 PM

That is an impressive array of bits Mads. Another good purchase. Are you buying these on Ebay or Craigslist?

There won’t be much drilling needed for this project. Mainly for the dowels about 30 holes in all of the same diameter and one on the plane.

I am going to be buying my pine probably today. One board should do it. We won’t be using coopering math to calculate widths or angles. We will do it the ancient way by taking everything we need from from a simple circle drawn on the bottom piece.

I am buying wide enough material that I can make the stave’s different widths, which is what you see on the old ones. In old times folks used techniques that allowed them to use whatever dimensions they had available. It was difficult to buy dimensioned timber in 1000 AD!

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Clung's profile

Clung

98 posts in 1448 days


#8 posted 01-17-2011 11:09 PM

I’m definitely in! I’m thinking Ill be resawing some birch for it. Thanks for the blog!

-- Clarence

View daltxguy's profile

daltxguy

1373 posts in 2581 days


#9 posted 01-18-2011 01:40 AM

I’m just guessing but I think hazel and chestnut might work for the bands as well. I do plan to use willow, however, as willows, though not native to this region, literally grow as weeds around here due to some crazed bio-terrorist many years ago and nobody is going to care if I take some branches

Btw, what is the hoop handle made from? Same as the sides? Is that laminated or steam bent?

Also, I’m not clear on what the lag knife is or is being used for at the moment. If this will become clearer later, I’ll shut up.

-- If you can't joint it, bead it!

View ~Julie~'s profile

~Julie~

572 posts in 1701 days


#10 posted 01-18-2011 04:51 AM

I, too, have lots of wild weedy willow. The problem is that it is in the ground and we are at -25C with over a foot of snow in the bush. Do I have to strap on the snowshoes and cut it in the middle of winter? What would my forefathers have done… wait ‘til spring?

-- ~Julie~ followyourheartwoodworking.blogspot.ca

View stefang's profile

stefang

13104 posts in 2001 days


#11 posted 01-18-2011 12:41 PM

Good point Julie. In fact, the best time to harvest trees is in the winter. The reason being that there is much less sap at that time and also wood dries out slower in winter resulting in less splitting from drying. Of course with this project many of us will probably be buying pine that is fairly dry at our local building suppliers.

Though I don’t profess a lot of knowledge about this, the bindings have to be supple (read wet). They can therefore be harvested most anytime. If they are a bit dry then they can be soaked in water. In addition to being wet(ish), after splitting them in two, removing the bark and inner pith, we will be looping them around a rounded piece of wood held vertically in a vise and pulling it against this post moving the loop in the bindings back and forth against the post to make the binding even more supple. I will provide pics of this in a future blog.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14797 posts in 2342 days


#12 posted 01-18-2011 01:01 PM

Awesome, just awesome Mike!! I haven’t been this excited about something since I was preparing to go to the 1000 yd Black Powder in Ottawa to shoot against the Canadian and English teams!!

There won’t be any lynching. Come on back over here. Mike for president in 2012!!

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14797 posts in 2342 days


#13 posted 01-18-2011 01:04 PM

Forgot to mention, anyone who can’t find any suitable wood could use rawhide to make the binding. It would be a traditional material and was probably used, if not for construction, certainly for repairs.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View stefang's profile

stefang

13104 posts in 2001 days


#14 posted 01-18-2011 01:55 PM

I’m glad you are so enthusiastic Bob! I am also looking eagerly forward to this project. I imagine that rawhide could well have been used as bindings where cowhide (or buffalo hide) was readily available, but probably not in wet climates. I’m thinking the Texas panhandle would would be ideal, lol. I can think that a leather strap could be used as a temporary binding while installing the willow bindings.

Yesterday I hand planed a piece of Sycamore to make a plane out of. probably not the best wood for a plane, but it was all I had that was big enough and dry, so I am just going to use it. I’ll be cutting the plane parts today and taking pictures of the steps. I already have a plane blade for it. It is 2” wide. I was lucky there because I had already ground and sharpened it to a radius to be used whenever I needed a scrub plane. I had forgotten all about it! And the radius works for this bucket. Maybe I should buy a lottery ticket while I’m having such a lucky streak.!

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14797 posts in 2342 days


#15 posted 01-18-2011 02:14 PM

I would defiinitely buy before you loose the touch :-) I’m going to see if I can find some willow?? I had a fast growing wild one of some kind in the yard a few years ago. The horticulturist told me to get rid of it if I didn’t want it to take over, so now I don’t have any :-((

Rawhide takes quite a bit of soaking for it to become pliable. You wouldn’t want it setting out in the rain all day, but for normal carrying water in, I think it would be just fine. It srinks down tight when it dries It is as hard as a rock after it dries out.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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