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Another Mush Box, and Help!!

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Blog entry by stefang posted 01-12-2011 06:21 PM 3614 reads 0 times favorited 26 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Last week I posted my latest turned Norwegian Porridge container. I have only made two of these. The first one was done awhile back. Instead of being carved like the new one, this one was painted with 3 coats of paint, black with antique red trim and a topcoat of poly. On top of that I rose painted it with a Norwegian traditional type of pattern.

MINOR DISASTER
The rose painting didn’t turn out as good as I had hoped, so I just put it aside and it sat on the shelf for about 3-4 years. I figured it would be easier to turn a new one than to scrape the paint off the old one. So that’s why I finally turned the new one. Well, today I went out to the shop to finish my cleaning job and deal with those dang nab cut-offs. Instead I began to wonder if my Dremel might be just the thing to remove that paint. So instead of cleaning I took a couple of hours to remove that paint on the old container, thereby making the shop even more messy (beats cleaning)!

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THE SAVE AND MORE TROUBLE
Of course after removing the paint I remembered why I painted it! That big knot on the front! Ok, I can probably put a plug in there or just leave it for character.

The main problem now is to somehow remove the paint that I can’t get at in nooks and crannys. Can anyone suggest a good rotary sander of some sort for this. I need something that won’t destroy the turned and carved details. I have messed them up a bit with the Dremel, but nothing I can’t smooth with sandpaper.

as you can see I’m just leaving the bottom black. I’ll probable carve a pattern of something right through the paint. Otherwise, as you can see the photo below, the inside bottom which is concave, didn’t much like the Dremel sanding drum, so I need something mounted on a drill to smooth that out too. I’m thinking some sort of thick soft disk or something. I would appreciate any suggestions for what to use there as well. Other than sanding disks, belts and drums I don’t have much experience. Don’t worry about possible bad suggestions, as I will take responsibility for anything that goes wrong.

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I could have made this blog a lot shorter, but I felt the need to blab a little since I didn’t have anything interesting to post right now. thanks for bearing with me, and I will appreciate your advice!

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.



26 comments so far

View Schwieb's profile

Schwieb

1574 posts in 2212 days


#1 posted 01-12-2011 06:54 PM

My Dad and Mom used to refinish a lot of furniture for people and getting paint out of the nooks and crannies of chairs and carvings was a particularly hard thing to do. He used to apply a small amout of paint remover to a cranky spot, let it work for awile, wipe off the gross excess and then use an air gun with a small orifice tip and literally blow it out. He might even repeat that a few times. Then it was just meticulous sanding with strips, sometimes attached to sticks. It could be a real PITA, if you know what I mean. I found this to be helpful in cleaning out old paint from the turnings on an old rocker I am restoring and wanted to not paint again.

-- Dr. Ken, Florida - Durch harte arbeit werden Träume wahr.

View David Craig's profile

David Craig

2135 posts in 1860 days


#2 posted 01-12-2011 07:12 PM

Hello Mike, nice looking vessels you have, satisfactory paint job or not. I feel your pain with the dremel sanding method. The dremels are aggressive and would be very difficult to use to sand without altering the piece in some way. Do you have any light bristle wire brush attachments? As advised by Dr. Ken,the thinner or stripper might help loosen the paint and if it can’t be blown out by an air gun, a wire brush set on low speed might be enough to loosen the flaking paint. If the brush were light, the scratches left might be manageable with hand sanding with a sponge.

Good luck and I hope it all comes out better than you hope,

David

-- There is little that is simple when it comes to making a simple box.

View stefang's profile

stefang

13633 posts in 2085 days


#3 posted 01-12-2011 07:12 PM

Thanks Doc. I’ll look into that. I’m not sure what kind of paint removers they have here as I haven’t used one since moving from the States. I’m just not sure I have a place to use it with the snow and frost right now.

Thanks David. I did try the Dremel wirebrush. It worked a little, but not good enough. Otherwise the Dremel did quite a good job except on the inside bottom. I had to use a light touch, but it went pretty well overall.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

15088 posts in 2427 days


#4 posted 01-12-2011 08:33 PM

Is there a way to chuck it up in the lathe and retouch the details??

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View stefang's profile

stefang

13633 posts in 2085 days


#5 posted 01-12-2011 08:49 PM

I doubt it Bob. Turnings usually warp just enough to put it out of balance and that could ruin everything.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

15088 posts in 2427 days


#6 posted 01-12-2011 09:01 PM

Oh well, back to the drawing board :-))

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Hopdevil's profile

Hopdevil

186 posts in 1837 days


#7 posted 01-12-2011 09:16 PM

Nice pieces!
Here is a crazy idea for you. It may work for some of the groves that go around the piece, not the shorter ones…. At craft stores, get some of those large pipe cleaners – the ones that come in all the silly colors. Dip them in paint remover and kind of saw them back and forth in the grove. I use them for cleaning between the gears of my bicycle and they work great for that. (your mileage may vary).
The other thing you may want to try from the craft stores as well are some of the tools used for pottery and sculpture. They come in plastic and metal tips and are angled in such a way to help you get into some of those grooves.
Good luck!

-- Buzz ---- Message sent from the End of the Internet.

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1866 days


#8 posted 01-12-2011 10:11 PM

nice box´s Mike
but I can´t help you with it
but Ken´s surgestion sounds good

take care
Dennis

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3685 posts in 1915 days


#9 posted 01-13-2011 01:23 AM

Here is a novel idea, go over to the HomeRefurbers forum and ask them…......I know how to pass the buck!

Re the knot. How about a medallion of some sort, coat of arms, whatever. The curve might be a little tricky, but if you start out with a bigger piece and bandsaw or scollsaw the back to the proper radius, I bet it might work. Then cut a plug out of it with the scroll saw, and carve the face.

How about a false bottom, that would take care of the bottom itself, the rest will probably take some inventive chemistry and elbow grease…...or set a spindle or drum to the right height and take off a defined amount of paint and wood. Perhaps even a sandpaper wrapped specially cut disk with a spindle chucked into the drill press….....

OK….......I know, that was off the wall stuff, but I am pretty punchy today…....working too hard this week.

Good luck on the endeavour, but remember, we are expecting something wonderful again….....you are now your only competition, but that is the big leagues….........(-:

Jim

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

7191 posts in 2054 days


#10 posted 01-13-2011 05:04 AM

mike i have the best solution over them all…im a genius…send it to me and i will worry about it…hows that for quick and to the point…lol…maybe the pipe cleaners will work..it sounds like a great idea….or what the doc said…best of luck with it…they are wonderful projects…

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

15088 posts in 2427 days


#11 posted 01-13-2011 08:26 AM

I just had a better idea Grizz, Mike can send it to my mom. She can paint over it and cover up the old paint when she rosemals it. It will turn out pretty good. Her teacher told her she was good enough to be pro, but she considers herself an intermediate ;-)

I suppose there might be a few rosemalers a few miles closer!!

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View stefang's profile

stefang

13633 posts in 2085 days


#12 posted 01-13-2011 10:32 AM

Thanks to buzz, Dennis, Iim, Grizz and Bob for your comments. I’m not too worried about the black bottom. I can carve a little on it and make it look ok. It’s the concave inside around the legs that needs some remedial work.

The Pipebrush Buzz suggested sounds good with the paint remover. The probllem is that I’m not yet sure paint remover is sold over here, so I will be checking that out today. My wife came up with a good idea too, which was to use fingernail polish remover otherwise known Acetone. I do have a large bottle of Acetone. That combined with the pipebrush might be a good alternative if I can’t get the paint remover.

Jim, thanks for the design idea. I am somewhat limited on carving design to something traditional, otherwise it would lose it’s connection with the past. I think I will probably put in a nice plug in a way that the glue lines will be disguised by the carving pattern. The plug might have to be a triangle or some other odd shape. That should make the cover-up job more interesting too!

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View mafe's profile

mafe

9687 posts in 1840 days


#13 posted 01-13-2011 01:27 PM

Hi Mike.
Wonderful to hear your blab again, it makes me smile.
Sorry but I have no good ideas, but a dark woodcolor, might hide many of the problems, so perhaps it will be the best to do.
Otherwise you can paint it! What about: 3 coats of paint, black with antique red trim and a topcoat of poly. On top of that rose paint with a Norwegian traditional type of pattern.
This will keep you buisy! Laugh. Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View stefang's profile

stefang

13633 posts in 2085 days


#14 posted 01-13-2011 04:37 PM

Thanks for that great suggestion Mads, I hadn’t thought of that! Your’re too late though. I just bought some acetone and some pipe cleaners. They did have paint remover at the store, but at approx. $35 (kr. 209,-) I decided to try the acetone. for a little over $10. I needed acetone anyway for my mixed drinks, ha ha.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3685 posts in 1915 days


#15 posted 01-13-2011 05:48 PM

I keep a gallon can of acetone around. It is my goto item for major screwups in the finishing, and general mess arena. Needless to say, I go through a lot of acetone….......(-:

Have a good, one…........the thermometer is on a downward slide here, 4 deg F, -15.6 deg C at 0645hrs. The house is now a…......madhouse. Daugher, son-in-law, and three grandkids arrived yesterday. Noise level picks up quite a bit.

Jim

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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