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Industrial Scale Dust Collection #5: Removing old bags.

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Blog entry by Mainiac Matt posted 09-01-2015 03:37 PM 1089 reads 0 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 4: Houston, the Eagle has landed... Part 5 of Industrial Scale Dust Collection series Part 6: Murphy bit us »

I mentioned previously that we were disappointed to discover that this bag house had been used in some kind of a stone crushing operation. We had hoped that the bags, which have a reputation for lasting quite a long time and can be washed and repaired, would be useable. But they are caked heavy with talcum powder fine stone dust. The equipment dealer is selling us replacement bags at wholesale cost, but we were concerned about the labor involved with exchanging 124 bags. We were also concerned that having the bag house transported on it’s side may have bent or damaged the bag cages.

Here you can see the bottom of the bags, with several removed

It turns out that our bag house cages are not screwed into place as previously thought (and feared that the hardware would be rusted). Rather, this system uses a lip in the bag to snap into the plate hole, and then when the cage is inserted, the bag is pressed and held into position.

Here’s a detailed view of the double lip on the bag

Here’s a detail of the cages, bottom is closed off, and top has funnel shaped air baffle

And here’s the growing stack of cages, which appear to be made from galvanized metal wire

We used a man lift on a fork truck to get up on top of the bag house and into the access door for a look see yesterday. The upper (clean air) section is in pretty good shape with just a small amount of preservation needed.

The reverse air cleaning mechanism is robustly constructed and in good condition. I’ll try to post a pick of that soon.

If you ever get into a project like this, make sure you know exactly what materials the system was being used for. While I believe we will be fully functional, there is the real likely hood that some of the baffles and walls exposed to the high velocity dirty air are abraded thin by the stone dust.

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!



9 comments so far

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Mainiac Matt

5993 posts in 1793 days


#1 posted 09-01-2015 03:42 PM

ps. Unfortunately, managing this project has required calling out a fellow manager about his people not supporting (i.e. scoffing at) the project timeline.

I know our maintenance mechanics are very busy, but they have to delegate, prioritize and get it done, just like everyone else does, and bright sun lit blue sky days are going to be fewer and farther between if we let this drag on into the New England fall.

Turns out that this will take two men a full day to complete, but that is better than I had feared.

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

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Mainiac Matt

5993 posts in 1793 days


#2 posted 09-01-2015 06:18 PM


calling out a fellow manager
- Mainiac Matt

edited to add that this was done 1 on 1 in private… I don’t go for the public shaming thing

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

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DIYaholic

19178 posts in 2139 days


#3 posted 09-01-2015 07:03 PM


....this was done 1 on 1 in private… I don t go for the public shaming thing

- Mainiac Matt

Kudos, you’re a good manager and a good man!!!

Thanks for the update. Carry on….

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

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Richard

1898 posts in 2155 days


#4 posted 09-01-2015 07:54 PM

....this was done 1 on 1 in private… I don t go for the public shaming thing

- Mainiac Matt

Kudos, you re a good manager and a good man!!!

Thanks for the update. Carry on….

- DIYaholic


I really wish more Managers had the same mind set , I really feel bad for people when they get “Dressed Down” in Public. If it happens to me I jump right in their face and say things I might be better off not saying. so far it hasn’t got me fired YET.

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Mainiac Matt

5993 posts in 1793 days


#5 posted 09-01-2015 08:34 PM

Having made just about every mistake in the book, I’ve finally figured a couple things out.

Having a boss who’s not coy about letting me know when I’m out of line is helpful…. or at least, once I learned to receive criticism and not take it personal, it became helpful.

Speaking of which, I better check the forecast and if there’s rain, make sure everything got covered up down there. Oooops!

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

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CFrye

8748 posts in 1304 days


#6 posted 09-02-2015 07:59 AM

Matt, this is interesting, learning how the industrial DC work. Thanks for sharing your (employer’s) project.

-- God bless, Candy

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Mainiac Matt

5993 posts in 1793 days


#7 posted 09-02-2015 04:33 PM

Light reading, just in case you’re worried about blowing up the house :^o

What are KSt and Pmax?

KSt and Pmax are the explosive properties measured in the laboratory to quanitify the severity of a dust explosion. Basically, the tests tell you how much pressure an explosion will generate and how fast the explosion will travel.

The “Explosion Severity Test” is a standard dust test used to quantity the maximum pressure of a dust cloud explosion (Pmax) and the speed of the pressure rise (KSt).

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

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Mainiac Matt

5993 posts in 1793 days


#8 posted 09-02-2015 04:36 PM

Just found out that our maintenance supervisor threw out the old bags, despite being told that they could be washed and re-used and that I was concerned the new bags on order (>2 week lead time) might not be exactly correct, so we better keep the old bags around for a while just in case.

It’s days like this when I miss being in the navy where people understood the concept of doing what you’re told.

:^(

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

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Richard

1898 posts in 2155 days


#9 posted 09-02-2015 07:08 PM


Just found out that our maintenance supervisor threw out the old bags, despite being told that they could be washed and re-used and that I was concerned the new bags on order (>2 week lead time) might not be exactly correct, so we better keep the old bags around for a while just in case.

It s days like this when I miss being in the navy where people understood the concept of doing what you re told.

:^(

- Mainiac Matt


Matt even in the Navy doing what your told could Blow Up in your face , Just depends on who is doing the telling. Nothing is Sailor Proof. Guess how I know this. :)

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