Bench/stand for metal working lathe #10: Skim coat to make up for my "iffy" flat work

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Blog entry by Mainiac Matt posted 01-10-2015 05:54 PM 1482 reads 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 9: Leveled the bench and poured concrete top Part 10 of Bench/stand for metal working lathe series Part 11: Houston, the Eagle has landed »

Every time I do mason work, I finish up with a fresh respect for professional masons who do the work very well. There’s more science to it than one might think and it takes a lot of practice to get the techniques right.

My second observation is that whenever I do a project that doesn’t turn out so well, I always find that there are good YouTube videos out there that would have helped me a lot, had I watched them BEFORE I started, as I made the classic novice error of mixing the concrete too soupy and wound up with a puddle that couldn’t be properly floated.

So being none to impressed with the coarse, slightly unlevel finish of my concrete poor, now that it’s pretty well cured, I decided to try doing a skim coat.

I found a half bag of ConPro Oneshot in my shed, but when I tested it in a corner, it crumbled when dry….. Home Depot, here I come. They have a product by Henry called Uni Pro that gets good reviews,and best of all, I didn’t have to buy a huge bag…. I chose the little 3 lb. box fox $6.

This time I prepped the surface by putting a “curb” on 3 sides. Mixing was easy, but this stuff sets up really fast, so you have to think it through and even do a dry run….. Just like with a big clamped glue up.

I used my Sheetrock tools, which worked well…

I was just a little short of mix, but it’s very close. I’ll evaluate it when dry and may hit it again, as it was easy enough.

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

6 comments so far

View firefighterontheside's profile


13115 posts in 1281 days

#1 posted 01-10-2015 09:03 PM

Looking better. I guess the most important thing is that the lathe sits on there without wobbling.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View lightcs1776's profile


4145 posts in 1078 days

#2 posted 01-10-2015 11:19 PM

Looks good, Matt. It will look even better once the lathe is on it.

-- Chris ** If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my child may have peace. — Tom Paine **

View Don Broussard's profile

Don Broussard

2989 posts in 1676 days

#3 posted 01-11-2015 02:36 AM

Looking forward to seeing the lathe mounted and in service, Matt, but not as much as you do!

-- People say I hammer like lightning. It's not that I'm fast -- it's that I never hit the same place twice!

View DIYaholic's profile


19141 posts in 2099 days

#4 posted 01-11-2015 05:27 AM

Ya know…. they sell pre-made counter tops.
That look just like concrete, marble or even granite…
A lot less work & easier on the back!!!

With all the effort you have put into this build….
I have no doubt that great things will come….
From your metal eating behemoth!!!

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

8111 posts in 2853 days

#5 posted 01-11-2015 02:06 PM

Looking good, Matt. Can’t wait to see it with the lathe on it.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View Mainiac Matt 's profile

Mainiac Matt

5961 posts in 1753 days

#6 posted 01-11-2015 02:51 PM

But do they way 300 lb, and if so, how do I bring one home :^p

Trust me, 80 lb. at a whack was bad enough :^o

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

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