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Bench/stand for metal working lathe #8: Ready for the top

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Blog entry by Mainiac Matt posted 12-28-2014 03:20 PM 1341 reads 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 7: Sand, start finish and tool tray Part 8 of Bench/stand for metal working lathe series Part 9: Leveled the bench and poured concrete top »

The finish is more or less a bust (I’m not showing the bad sides), but I need to move on….

Here it is with the tool tray mounted …

And if you haven’t figured it out yet, here are the materials for the top…

A rebar reinforced, 5” thick, poured concrete block, with vertical pipes for through bolting the lathe down….

Anybody got a 24” bull float I can borrow?

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!



6 comments so far

View Mainiac Matt 's profile

Mainiac Matt

5994 posts in 1793 days


#1 posted 12-28-2014 03:37 PM

Estimated weight of the top alone is 320 lbs.

:^o

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

3926 posts in 2708 days


#2 posted 12-28-2014 06:19 PM

I don’t quite understand the need for concrete for the top. I suspect you are trying to get a flat surface so the lathe will sit without twisting the lathe ways. There are other ways to accomplish this without using concrete. With the weight of the lathe and the concrete, the bench will be top heavy; better to put the concrete down close to the floor for better balance.

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

19179 posts in 2140 days


#3 posted 12-29-2014 04:07 AM

I like the lathe anchoring method.
Will the holes in the top….
Match the holes in your head??? ;^)

How long will you need to let the concrete cure?

I know you are going for vibration dampening with the concrete, but….
Have you considered adding fiberglass reinforcement (to the concrete)?

At 320+ pounds….
Big Blue would be needed to pull that bench out of the basement.
Hope you aren’t moving anytime soon!!!

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

View Roger's profile

Roger

19878 posts in 2269 days


#4 posted 12-29-2014 01:04 PM

You should be able to park a Ford F-350 on that puppy

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Keep your dust collector fed. Kentuk55@yahoo.com

View Mainiac Matt 's profile

Mainiac Matt

5994 posts in 1793 days


#5 posted 12-29-2014 10:22 PM

Ron… The idea is to hard bolt the lathe to the top and in doing so making the lathe bed more rigid and massive, so that it is less inclined to chatter on hard cuts and give a crapy finish. It will definitely be top heavy, but the will be about 75 lbs of tooling stowed on the bottom shelf and I will secure it to the wall with ‘L’ brackets to ensure it doesn’t do anything unexpected.

Randy… I will park it in its final resting place b4 I pour the concrete, and declare it immoveable afterwards.

Yah, it’s kind of a crazy design, and I’ll have no one but myself to blame if it’s a bust. But then again, it’s actually a pretty inexpensive build, and is goin fairly smoothely.

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

19179 posts in 2140 days


#6 posted 12-30-2014 01:25 AM



Yah, it s kind of a crazy design, and I ll have no one but myself to blame if it s a bust. But then again, it s actually a pretty inexpensive build, and is goin fairly smoothely.

- Mainiac Matt

I wouldn’t say it’s a crazy design.
Then again…. I’m crazy!!!

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

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