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Bench/stand for metal working lathe #2: Joinery decisions and cutting the framing members

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Blog entry by Mainiac Matt posted 12-18-2014 03:47 AM 1525 reads 0 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: New lathe needs a place to hang out Part 2 of Bench/stand for metal working lathe series Part 3: more progress »

The top needs a 1×10 perimeter frame…. I was going to try using a Lock Miter bit I have, but couldn’t get a tight fit and the end grain locking tab kept braking. So I decided to glue and screw a simple but joint…

to support the frame, I cut a shelves on the outer sides of the post tops. I cut the cheeks on the band saw and for the shoulders I set the depths stop on my SCMS and used the fence stop to get identical parts.

A little paring with a 3” timber framing chisel used like a slick

All cleaned up and spiffy….

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!



10 comments so far

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Mainiac Matt

5994 posts in 1793 days


#1 posted 12-18-2014 03:57 AM

Next up are lap joints for the stretchers… time to set up the dado blade.

Setting up stop blocks on the fence helped for repeatable cuts… I cut the top and the bottom

And then using shims to make the step cuts to clear the middle.

Here they are…

(one little boo-boo)

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

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Mainiac Matt

5994 posts in 1793 days


#2 posted 12-18-2014 04:02 AM

This dado blade was an economy setup called “Avenger” made by Steel-X

The side wall cuts are crisp and clean, but the bottom of the dado cut was not so smooth

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

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Mainiac Matt

5994 posts in 1793 days


#3 posted 12-18-2014 04:07 AM

Here’s a dry fit of a stretcher lap…

They fit snug, but the rounded off edge of the 2×4s make it look loose

Here’s a dry fit of the progress so far.

Looks more like a fish tank stand….

Next up is cutting some plywood.

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

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firefighterontheside

13487 posts in 1321 days


#4 posted 12-18-2014 04:10 AM

Looking good Matt. I couldn’t help notice…..it looks like you cut the wrong side of the line on one leg. I have never done that…..recently. Ruined an oak newel post when I did it. How much concrete will be in the bench?

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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DIYaholic

19179 posts in 2140 days


#5 posted 12-18-2014 04:23 AM

Lookin’ stout.

Looking forward to you “pouring” yourself into this project….
That and to seeing the projects coming from your metal eating lathe!!!

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

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CFrye

8749 posts in 1305 days


#6 posted 12-18-2014 04:40 AM

Looking good, Matt! Was recently reading that some ‘springiness’ is desirable in a lathe bench, not sure how it may apply to a metal cutting lathe?

-- God bless, Candy

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Mainiac Matt

5994 posts in 1793 days


#7 posted 12-18-2014 02:33 PM

Mr. Bill has noticed my boo-boo. I’ll mend that with a little scrap and some glue.

Candy… That’s very interesting about “springiness”. I do think that metal cutting presents a different paradigm, however. My (limited) research all points towards rigidity as the #1 desirable feature in mills and lathes, as any flexure will produce tool chatter and wreck the finish.

I originally planned on making Stumpy’s 2×6 Roubo bench, but I heard some reports of wood movement causing problems.

The goal hear is cheap, functional, and if possible…. adding rigidity.

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

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CFrye

8749 posts in 1305 days


#8 posted 12-18-2014 05:05 PM

Just thought I’d muddy the waters for you. Kidding. I read that in Practical Woodturner by F. Pain page 11. I could be misinterpreting it, as well.

-- God bless, Candy

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davidroberts

1025 posts in 2951 days


#9 posted 12-19-2014 03:58 AM

Looking Good!

“Looks more like a fish tank stand….”, haha…your bench is like a so not particularly interesting caterpillar today, metamorphosing into a detailed, intricate butterfly tomorrow. It will be strong like bull. I’ve used a thin strip jig to cut shims for dados, then realized I had 50 or so paint stirring sticks that all measured 1/8” thick, to a 64th. Thank you big box store. They make great shims to cut the slots in shop-made feather boards.

-- Better woodworking through old hand tools.

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Roger

19878 posts in 2269 days


#10 posted 12-21-2014 01:25 PM

If it is a fish tank, it’ll hold a whale… lol

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Keep your dust collector fed. Kentuk55@yahoo.com

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