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Hope Chest for Daughter #2 #19: I screwed up big time :^(

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Blog entry by Mainiac Matt posted 01-18-2017 12:41 AM 762 reads 0 times favorited 3 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 18: Hand sanding & sealing the panels Part 19 of Hope Chest for Daughter #2 series Part 20: Re-routed and sanded the raised panels »

The Amana AGM raised panel set I’m using has a back cutter and came set up with a large bearing.

Everything turned out great, but I did think that the depth of the Ogee wasn’t quite what I thought it should be and the panels don’t drop into the styles very far.

The instructions that came with the set seemed great, but did not include any illustrations or reference to the back cutter feature. So I used the bits as they came set up from the factory…...... WRONG!!!!

So I go to Amana’s web site tonight and find a brochure for the raised panel set with the back cutter and it turns out that there’s a smaller bearing that came with the set, which I should have used.


Bad news… I’ve finish sanded and sealed three of the six panels already…

Good news… The router table is still set up at exactly the correct height, so I can swap the bearings and cut the deeper Ogee.

Bad news… In order to prevent tearing out the trailing edge when routing the end grain, I backed up the panel with a piece of scrap and I cut both end grain ends first before cutting the long grain….

BUT HOW CAN I BACK UP THE END GRAIN CUTS AND PREVENT TEAR OUT NOW THAT I’VE ALREADY ROUTED ALL FOUR SIDES?

Needless to say, I’m pretty frustrated and do not want to lose these panels or have ugly tear out on each one.

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!



3 comments so far

View Mikesawdust's profile

Mikesawdust

323 posts in 2849 days


#1 posted 01-18-2017 09:24 AM

I’ve recut panels before and not had issues with tear out. The panel already being relieved in the long edges makes it work, just go slow at the last part of each end, and back the very edge. Any small chipping in the face should be cleared when you do the long grain.

-- You never cut a piece to short, you are just prepping that piece for a future project

View Roger's profile

Roger

20873 posts in 2614 days


#2 posted 02-01-2017 01:55 PM

The only tip that I can add is always cut the end grain first, then do the long grain sides.

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Keep your dust collector fed. Kentuk55@yahoo.com

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

4379 posts in 2014 days


#3 posted 03-11-2017 07:49 PM

You may try some sacrificial sides, (cut to the incorrect profile with its matching cutter) attach them and then re route both.

-- Regards Robert

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