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Cutting Boards and Bandsaws

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Blog entry by Steve posted 03-06-2018 04:48 PM 743 reads 0 times favorited 4 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I normally don’t mind saw blade changes, but I make an exception for the bandsaw, which is no fun at all. After the struggle to get the old blade off and the new one seated, there’s the long tedious process of setting the guides just so.

In this case, I was installing a new resaw blade. I ruined the old one well over a year ago when I hit a hidden spike in a chunk of reclaimed pine. The blade made it through the steel, but (of course) was never the same again. I’ve been doing without a good resaw blade for a while, but finally came to the conclusion that I was wasting lumber with inappropriate blades.

(As a side note, I tried to buy a replacement blade from Grizzly, the maker of the saw, but they added a $2 “California delivery surcharge” on top of $10.00 in postage to cover “regulatory fees” for an item shipped via the US Postal Service. As a matter of protest, I took my business elsewhere.)

The new blade—like all new saw blades—cuts like a hot knife through butter. I cut down a stack of why-did-I-make-these-so-thick wine and cheese boards, turning four boards into eight, then sliced up some maple and jatoba to make four of my mid-century modern boards.

Cutting some of the thinner elements, I was reminded once again that I really need to make a zero-clearance insert for this saw. Also, I need to plan better—as I always end up an element or two short somehow.

I love clamping up a project at the end of the day—the excitement of seeing the finished product always gets me into the shop early the next morning. In this case, unfortunately, my day is filled with other errands. I’ll be unclamping these tomorrow instead.

-- ~Steve



4 comments so far

View AlmostRetired's profile

AlmostRetired

219 posts in 919 days


#1 posted 03-06-2018 06:13 PM

What is the jig that seems to be pressing the wood against the fence doing for you?

Roger

View stefang's profile

stefang

16144 posts in 3539 days


#2 posted 03-06-2018 06:49 PM

Having spent a good part of my day doing the same thing, I know where you’re coming from. I kind of wish I had bought a smaller machine as my 18” bandsaw is heavier, takes more space and requires more work to tune than a smaller one which can do almost everything the big one can do.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Bill_Steele's profile (online now)

Bill_Steele

451 posts in 1937 days


#3 posted 03-06-2018 08:45 PM

Roger—I think that jig enables him to get a consistent thickness for the strips he’s cutting.

He moves the fence and the stock toward the jig and then locks the fence down when he’s tight against the jig. Make the cut. Then repeat the fence adjustment detailed above.

View Steve's profile

Steve

74 posts in 1215 days


#4 posted 03-06-2018 11:32 PM

Yep, that’s exactly right. Magnets embedded on the underside hold it firmly to the table. There’s a small strip of mdf, too, that fits into the miter slot. A little crude, but it works well.

~Steve


Roger—I think that jig enables him to get a consistent thickness for the strips he s cutting.

He moves the fence and the stock toward the jig and then locks the fence down when he s tight against the jig. Make the cut. Then repeat the fence adjustment detailed above.

- Bill_Steele


-- ~Steve

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