LumberJocks

Shop Notes #5: Sharpening

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Blog entry by Steve posted 01-19-2018 05:01 PM 749 reads 0 times favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 4: Planer Fun Part 5 of Shop Notes series Part 6: Chair Finials and Lathe Disaster »

Sharpening day yesterday. I don’t do this often enough, especially with my planes. Not sure why I procrastinate; it’s not an unpleasant job and the results are worth the effort.

The chisels on the bench are new—a gift last year. Some sharpened up right away, others took some scrubbing. Today I’ll be cleaning and inspecting my table saw blades.

I did take some time to do some actual work, though, tightening up some antique chairs. I don’t do furniture restoration as a rule, but a friend begged me to take these on. There are a few finials missing from this chair and it’s mate. Today I’ll be working at the lathe to make some replacements.

-- ~Steve



5 comments so far

View Andre's profile

Andre

2063 posts in 1952 days


#1 posted 01-19-2018 05:15 PM

I picked up a Extra fine Black Arkansa oil stone to touch up blades and use a maple block with green compound at the bench for a quick honing. I hollow grind all my blades so the oil stone seems to work okay between major re-sharpens, regrinds? Still go back to the water stones for some reason!

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View Steve's profile

Steve

74 posts in 1156 days


#2 posted 01-19-2018 07:09 PM

I use a leather strop fastened to a board with that green stuff for honing as well. Do you hollow grind your planer blades?

-- ~Steve

View Andre's profile

Andre

2063 posts in 1952 days


#3 posted 01-19-2018 11:47 PM

Yes, pretty well all my plane blades are PM-11, or Hocks so the extra thickness works out well!
One of my blocks has a patch of leather attached, sometimes stroke it a few times for more polish?

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View stefang's profile

stefang

15947 posts in 3480 days


#4 posted 01-21-2018 01:27 PM

It should give you some satisfaction to save and old chair like that. As they say, the mark of a good woodworker is fixing his mistakes without degrading his projects. I think the same is even more true of repair and restoration work. I bought a book on the subject written by a well regarded English restorer many years ago and I still like to browse through it occasionally as it has so many good tips on repairs. Tips that have actually saved some of my projects.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Steve's profile

Steve

74 posts in 1156 days


#5 posted 01-21-2018 04:46 PM

Mike, I agree—there is tremendous satisfaction in restoring, whether it’s making something usable again, or just making it presentable and lasting. I’ve restored a few cars in the past and love when I can fix something around the house, rather than just replace it.

But, I get pretty nervous around antique furniture that’s owned by a customer. Very often, the item has sentimental or emotional value far in excess of what it’s worth monetarily. A small mistake by me, or an untimely visit from a rambunctious dog could mean disaster for the piece and disappointment for the client. I vastly prefer new work, where I can roll with my errors.

~Steve

-- ~Steve

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