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My beginning and a workbench #1: Initial thoughts

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Blog entry by smstevo posted 01-06-2016 11:37 PM 809 reads 0 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of My beginning and a workbench series Part 2: Workbench done, photos inside. »

Hi all. I have been lurking and watching others on here for quite some time. I have been quite interested in woodworking for several years, but being in the military and moving around has made it difficult to do anything. I have either lived in the barracks, a small apartment, or have otherwise been restricted from having an area I was able to use for using the necessary tools.

Well, now I am in Hawaii and am about to move into an actual house, with a two car garage, and all of the space I could ever need. My main inspiration has been Paul Sellers, and as such, my first attempt will be to build the workbench he instructs through his YT channel.

I have very few tools, but will be buying what I need once my car arrives on island.

My first trip will be to Sports Authority so I can get a 175 gram Wham-o frisbee, and probably right on to either Lowes or Home Depot, where I will buy my necessary 2×4s. On my shopping list I have the following as of right now:

1. Gallon of glue
2. 8-10 aluminum bar clamps
3. 29 2×4s
4. Chisel set (or use my Craftsman set after sharpening)
5. Double sided hammer (or I may build a wooden mallet, not sure on that yet)
6. Crosscut saw
7. Back saw
8. Bench vise

So I have an old Stanley #4 which is what I’ll be using for most of the hard work (as I’m sure everyone knows from watching the videos) and I have a woodcraft B&M store on island, so I’ll be able to purchase some of the more specific items I want (i.e. I want to purchase a real nice dovetail saw).

Right now my sticking point is the bar clamps. Unfortunately, places like Harbor Freight require a hefty cost to ship to my address ($50+), so it makes their 36” clamps at $9.99 not very attractive. It’d be $80 for 8 clamps, then $50 for shipping, bringing it to about $16.25 for each clamp. I can’t find any on the used market right now (such as on craigslist), so I am afraid I’ll have to buy them new at the Home Depot or Lowes, which I am okay with. If anyone has any suggestions on this point please let me know.

Once I start working on the bench, I plan to either video it or to heavily document it photographically so I can share the experience with everyone else on the WWW.

Looking forward to doing that.

Stevo



10 comments so far

View David Taylor's profile

David Taylor

326 posts in 555 days


#1 posted 01-07-2016 12:56 AM

You should be able to get some pipe clamp heads and pipes at HD/Lowes Very handy, monster clamping pressure if you want it, and should be low money.

-- Learn Relentlessly

View smstevo's profile

smstevo

9 posts in 339 days


#2 posted 01-07-2016 06:21 AM

I’m looking. Not finding things that would match up at good prices yet.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 954 days


#3 posted 01-07-2016 06:30 AM

Pipe clamps are your best bet heavy laminations. Good luck.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View smstevo's profile

smstevo

9 posts in 339 days


#4 posted 01-07-2016 06:33 AM

Anything you could recommend specifically with a good price to quality ratio?

View smstevo's profile

smstevo

9 posts in 339 days


#5 posted 01-07-2016 07:40 AM

I’m thinking about making some clamps myself, such as in this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vSwlM7cf6mo

View David Taylor's profile

David Taylor

326 posts in 555 days


#6 posted 01-08-2016 03:57 AM

I have these clamp heads (around $13) – http://www.homedepot.com/p/Pony-Adjustable-3-4-in-Pipe-Clamp-50-2PK/100132368

Married them with black iron pipe, also from Home Depot – about $10 for three foot lengths

This then means you have a really good and useful three foot clamp for $25. A Bessey KR3.531 (31” capacity) runs closer to $50. Plus, the versatility you get in being able to use couplings to lengthen your clamps when needed, and the different length pipes for different usage, means they are a good bargain in the long haul.

-- Learn Relentlessly

View BrettMcD's profile

BrettMcD

13 posts in 2004 days


#7 posted 01-08-2016 10:58 PM

stevo

two options come to mind. I built (2) English style workbenchs of the same type that paul sellers uses. First options when you go to the home improvement store just get (4) 2X12 however long you need them (i.e. 8 ft 10ft ect) two 2X12 for the aprons and 2X12 for the top build a torsion box between your apron (just like floor joists) and whammo you have sturdy workbench. as added insurance you can glue and screw (use where you will be drilling a 3/4” hole to screw together then remove screw and use hole for you pilot on your 3/4 hole perfect holdfast hole and no screw mark) a 1X12 behind the 2X12 giving you 2.25 inches for your holdfast to work and grip on. If you look at my projects page you should see the first workbench I built just like that it is very strong (this is the traditional method of building one) Option 2 if you are set on a glued lamination for the top but short of cash. This is what I would do get the (2) 2X12 aprons and grab as many 2X4 for the top as you need. Get a box of 2 1/4” screws line two boards together drill pilot hole and glue and screw two pieces together for each laminate let glue set remove screws and add another board since you will probable only need 8 pieces on each laminate you can work on this in the evenings for a week in between building the base. Wow that was a long winded reply if you have any question let me know feel free to disregard this as well. Also you can see both workbenchs on my projects.
Brett

View smstevo's profile

smstevo

9 posts in 339 days


#8 posted 01-09-2016 07:06 AM



stevo

two options come to mind. I built (2) English style workbenchs of the same type that paul sellers uses. First options when you go to the home improvement store just get (4) 2X12 however long you need them (i.e. 8 ft 10ft ect) two 2X12 for the aprons and 2X12 for the top build a torsion box between your apron (just like floor joists) and whammo you have sturdy workbench. as added insurance you can glue and screw (use where you will be drilling a 3/4” hole to screw together then remove screw and use hole for you pilot on your 3/4 hole perfect holdfast hole and no screw mark) a 1X12 behind the 2X12 giving you 2.25 inches for your holdfast to work and grip on. If you look at my projects page you should see the first workbench I built just like that it is very strong (this is the traditional method of building one) Option 2 if you are set on a glued lamination for the top but short of cash. This is what I would do get the (2) 2X12 aprons and grab as many 2X4 for the top as you need. Get a box of 2 1/4” screws line two boards together drill pilot hole and glue and screw two pieces together for each laminate let glue set remove screws and add another board since you will probable only need 8 pieces on each laminate you can work on this in the evenings for a week in between building the base. Wow that was a long winded reply if you have any question let me know feel free to disregard this as well. Also you can see both workbenchs on my projects.
Brett

- BrettMcD

Brett,

Thanks for the comments. I will check out your builds and maybe I’ll attempt one of them. I’m always looking for a better way to do the same thing.

Really. thanks!

Steveo

View smstevo's profile

smstevo

9 posts in 339 days


#9 posted 01-11-2016 07:39 AM

Thanks for all of the replies.

So I am going to go with Paul Seller’s build for the workbench. I am working on refinishing a not so old Stanley #4, and have purchased a Woodriver #4 and 4 piece chisel set. We’ll see how the plane turns out.

I will put together a few sawhorses within the week, and then begin on the lamanation and planing.

I’ll let you know how things go.

View smstevo's profile

smstevo

9 posts in 339 days


#10 posted 01-18-2016 07:43 AM

So. So far I haven’t got much woodworking done. I’ve been trying to get to garage sales and flea markets to pick up tools at good prices. I’ve found some good stuff though. I hope to do a 2×6 bench now, instead of the many 2×4s Paul Sellers suggests.

I’ve purchased a really nice bench vise that I’m currently derusting, and I’ve also picked up many planes, including some block planes, and a #4, #5, and a #6 Stanley. I bought all of these super cheap and fixed them up myself.

I fixed up these and they are all really sharp. I can shave with either of the chisels!

Now, the only problem is that I picked up a #6 Stanley in pretty original condition, except they had a new blade on there. They had the old blade included, which I was working on reshaping, but here’s what it looks like. What should I do with this angled blade?? Or, does this particular blade offer something that I’m not aware of?

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