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Disston Handsaw Restoration #4: Chopping up plane for saw tote

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Blog entry by Skip Mathews posted 07-16-2014 04:00 AM 1023 reads 0 times favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 3: Tote Wood Part 4 of Disston Handsaw Restoration series Part 5: I think I am finished »

I cut up an old plane to get what I think might be beech wood for my num 12 handsaw tote.
This plane was for scrap anyway so here we go!

Then I cut it to size with my previously restored Disston rip saw.
Wow! That saw cuts really fast!

Then I joint the edge with one of the planes I cobbled together from a box of six planes I bought on Ebay.
The plane I just cut up came out of the same box. Seems strange for some reason?
Reminds me of the lyrics “From the forest itself comes the handle for the axe”

Ripping it down a little more.

This is how the pieces will go together.
I hope the grain of the wood lines up okay.
You can already see the upper horn in the grain of the wood.
At the bottom of the original tote the grain is pretty tight and the new piece should match up okay.

I used Gorilla epoxy to glue the bottom clip/horn piece on and will glue the upper horn piece on tomorrow.

I like it so far!
I think the new wood will be a little light in color.
Not sure if I should try to blend with stain or just leave the repair pieces lighter in color but very functional.

-- Being focused on a project is the best meditation, it allows you to live in the moment"



15 comments so far

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

11480 posts in 1762 days


#1 posted 07-16-2014 11:08 AM

Good start. How will you hold the bottom piece on? with a blind dowel?
A darker piece of wood might eliminaet matching when you get ‘er done!
..................Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View Skip Mathews's profile

Skip Mathews

79 posts in 506 days


#2 posted 07-16-2014 02:00 PM

Jim – I figure the epoxy is all that’s needed to hold the repairs.

-- Being focused on a project is the best meditation, it allows you to live in the moment"

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

10847 posts in 1663 days


#3 posted 07-16-2014 03:04 PM

Lookin good so far Skip. A trick I learned from LJ DonW is to drill very small diameter holes in the areas that will get the epoxy. It gives a bit more grab to the epoxied surfaces. Ive done a couple this way and haven’t had one break or not fully adhere yet. Matching the colors is still a trick that I haven’t figured out yet but im working on it. Right now im trying out some transtint dye and a bit of sanding to reduce color in the darker areas and heavier coats in lighter areas.

Just wait until you get into backsaws ;)

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

View palaswood's profile

palaswood

777 posts in 407 days


#4 posted 07-17-2014 08:16 PM

+1 on the small holes. i just go in a few mm with a small bit like 7/64th and randomly add a bunch of holes but not too many to compromise structural integrity and not too close to any edge.

-- Joseph, Lake Forest, CA, http://instagram.com/palas_woodcraft#

View Skip Mathews's profile

Skip Mathews

79 posts in 506 days


#5 posted 07-17-2014 09:03 PM

Chris and Joseph – Thanks for the advise. I will try the holes on the upper horn but I already epoxied the bottom piece. I thought I could cut a small slice off the bottom, drill and peg it and then glue the slice back on before shaping it. I think that would work.

-- Being focused on a project is the best meditation, it allows you to live in the moment"

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

10847 posts in 1663 days


#6 posted 07-18-2014 01:02 PM

I wouldn’t sweat it personally Skip. Once you start shaping the handle it’ll either pop off or stay put. If it pops off, drill some holes, if it don’t, youre good. You’ve got a pretty good amount of surface area at the grip portion of the handle and some end grain and long grain on the other area.

Are you planning on chip carving the floral motif to match up?

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

View Skip Mathews's profile

Skip Mathews

79 posts in 506 days


#7 posted 07-18-2014 02:21 PM

Yes, I hope to get the chip carving matched in.
I finished shaping the lower part of the tote this morning and the epoxy held fine with a lot of abuse.
It looks awesome!!
I still need to glue on the upper horn tonight.
I planned on using BLO as a finish. I understand it can be tinted. Any experience with this?
I think I read that I can tint with artist oil paint??? does that sound right?

-- Being focused on a project is the best meditation, it allows you to live in the moment"

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

10847 posts in 1663 days


#8 posted 07-18-2014 03:10 PM

Crusin right along, I like it! I wouldn’t call myself a finishing guru so im not sure if you can or cant tint BLO but I do know that I really like it on apple wood. Keep us posted.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

View summerfi's profile

summerfi

1064 posts in 343 days


#9 posted 07-18-2014 10:59 PM

I use these little gizmos for making glue joints instead of the drill technique. Just score the wood on each side of the joint in a diagonal cross hatch pattern to give the glue a place to grab. The wood will break before the glue does. Been working great for 50 years.

-- Bob, Missoula, MT -- "Of all the tools I own, my favorite is a good sharp pocket knife." - My Dad

View Skip Mathews's profile

Skip Mathews

79 posts in 506 days


#10 posted 07-19-2014 03:26 AM

I can see how that would work! Did you make those tools?

-- Being focused on a project is the best meditation, it allows you to live in the moment"

View summerfi's profile

summerfi

1064 posts in 343 days


#11 posted 07-19-2014 03:55 AM

Yeah, they’re only 4 or 5 in. long.

-- Bob, Missoula, MT -- "Of all the tools I own, my favorite is a good sharp pocket knife." - My Dad

View Skip Mathews's profile

Skip Mathews

79 posts in 506 days


#12 posted 07-19-2014 03:57 AM

Here is a quick progress update
This is getting real close to what I want!

-- Being focused on a project is the best meditation, it allows you to live in the moment"

View Skip Mathews's profile

Skip Mathews

79 posts in 506 days


#13 posted 07-19-2014 04:00 AM

I just noticed this “X” this evening. What do you suppose it means? It is covered by the tote.

-- Being focused on a project is the best meditation, it allows you to live in the moment"

View summerfi's profile

summerfi

1064 posts in 343 days


#14 posted 07-19-2014 04:06 AM

You’re doing a nice job on that handle, Skip. The X was on all of Disston’s premium saws like Nos. 9, 12, 16, 99. It signified extra refined spring steel. Occasionally you’ll also find what appears to be the maker’s initials stamped near the X. My No. 9 has a 3 stamped below the X, but I haven’t a clue what that means.

Edit: Just had a thought. My No. 9 is a 30” plate, so do you suppose the 3 could indicate that?

-- Bob, Missoula, MT -- "Of all the tools I own, my favorite is a good sharp pocket knife." - My Dad

View Skip Mathews's profile

Skip Mathews

79 posts in 506 days


#15 posted 07-20-2014 04:56 AM

Thank you for the info on the “X”. The more I learn about this saw the more worthwhile the restoration becomes.

I glued the upper horn on this evening but I had to make a new one. The first one turned out to be too small. The double nib just in front of the horn was damaged so I decided to cut half of it off and of course that made the horn piece to short. so… I made a new one.

Here is a small back-saw that I repaired recently. It has been bumping around in my garage for about thirty years and I have no memory from whence it came. The bottom clip was broken. It was a little warped so I had to steam it lightly and bend it back so it would be close enough to glue together.
Then I sharpened it. It has little tiny teeth and a real strain on the eyes. I works great now. I really like using it. I think it is about the same age as the num 12 I am working on now. It has a small piece of wood missing where the back inserts and I should go ahead and fix it while I am fixing saws, although it doesn’t affect the use of the saw.

-- Being focused on a project is the best meditation, it allows you to live in the moment"

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