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Paduak Coffee Table

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Blog entry by Steve Friedman posted 09-14-2009 12:34 AM 1131 reads 0 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I’m building a coffee table using Padauk. I am looking for advise on how to save the natural color of this piece of furniture. The base will also be made from Padauk, as the picture shows, I’ve completed the top, and about to start the base.

Any and all advise is appreciated.

Steve

-- Steve



8 comments so far

View Mike Shea's profile

Mike Shea

152 posts in 2748 days


#1 posted 09-14-2009 01:24 AM

I absoloutly love padauk. Its my favorite non domestic wood. i would stick with linseed oil and tung oil if you want to save the naturaul collor. Linssed oil will penetrate the wood to bring out the collor while the tung oil will give allitle protection. If you are going to put allot of drinks on the table then i would recomend going with a polyeurethane top coat of some sort. there are a million options but those are my favorites.

-- i can do all things through christ who strengthens me

View Roper's profile

Roper

1363 posts in 2467 days


#2 posted 09-14-2009 01:36 AM

i am with mike i am a big fan of tung oil and a coat or two of beeswax. just remember that no matter what you finish padauk with it will eventually darken and turn brown.

-- Roper - Master of sawdust- www.roperwoodturning.com

View HokieMojo's profile

HokieMojo

2103 posts in 2482 days


#3 posted 09-14-2009 02:56 AM

keep it out of sunlight too. thtat will help slow it down, but they are right. It will change with time.

View Wingstress's profile

Wingstress

329 posts in 2269 days


#4 posted 09-14-2009 03:29 AM

Hey steve, I agree with tung oil, then shellac or beeswax, but its such a shame when it turns brown. I’ve always wondered if bloodwood could be used as a substitute and if it keeps the red. Do you have any experience with bloodwood? Attached is a lazy susan I did with paduak and I saw it at my mom’s the other day (about a year old) and its as dark as a light walnut. It broke my heart…

Click for details

-- Tom, Simsbury, CT

View Steve Friedman's profile

Steve Friedman

19 posts in 1931 days


#5 posted 09-15-2009 11:56 PM

Hi Everyone,

I haven’t had a chance to foIllow up on the suggestions. I’ve been out of town for a 2 days. I really like the idea of the beeswax. I’ll have to explore that option.

When you use linseed oil and tung oil, do you use both of these, which order do you apply them? I’m also thinking that if I don’t seal it with wax, then I could give it a light sanding every once in a while to recast the color. Is that wise ?

I haven’t worked with bloodwood at all. It might be very interesting to work with as a fantastic accent. What other species do you combine it with?

My previous project, a birch plywood cabinet is yet to be stained. but it holds up the TV. It is 5’ wide, 20” tall and it has 6 open chambers for books, the DVD player, some wicker baskets and lots of dust.

I

-- Steve

View Wingstress's profile

Wingstress

329 posts in 2269 days


#6 posted 09-16-2009 02:31 AM

Steve, I’m not the expert here, I was hoping to get the answers from you, but I have found you either use linseed oil or tung oil, not together. (PLEASE someone correct me if I’m wrong). I do know with padauk, if you just rub some tung oil finish on it with a rag it will pop like you wouldn’t believe. Just absolutely wonderful! But, without some wax or shellac or sealer the tung oil will dull over time. However, that could be advantagous for a small project such as a clock or plaque or picture frame, that you would just hand rub once or twice a year to restore the finish. But if you are looking for a coffee table or durability, you need some protection, the oil will just penetrate and make the grain pop, not protect anything.

I personally like the look of tung oil better than linseed oil better (not sure why). The tung oil (finish not pure tung oil) drys really quickly so you can put one coat on before you go to bed each night and after 3-4 nights you have a wonderful finish.

Sorry if I’m rambling, but there is something about paduak and tung oil that I can’t get enough of…

So I don’t “highjack” your thread, I’m going to start a forum question about the differences between padauk and bloodwood and the dulling colors….

Another thing you may want to check out is the beal finishing system (buffing wheels with wax and tung oil, works great for small projects)

-- Tom, Simsbury, CT

View Steve Friedman's profile

Steve Friedman

19 posts in 1931 days


#7 posted 09-17-2009 02:24 AM

Hi Tom,

Wow, That was a lot of insight to what I thought was going to be a simple question. Your perspective is very much of interest to me. I think I’m going to experiment. I have some left over pieces I could try both linseed and tongue oil. I can also photo shot each of them and post to the site.

Go ahead and start the question regarding the bloodwood, and padauk.

A good friend of mine really likes the idea of making saw dust. I’m getting into it too. The buffing wheel sounds interesting.

Steve

-- Steve

View Wingstress's profile

Wingstress

329 posts in 2269 days


#8 posted 09-17-2009 02:56 AM

Careful man this stuff is addicting!!! Search the forum Bloodwood vs Paduak I posted last night. There has been some nice responses. Also on the beal wood buffing system website, there is a little video that shows how quick and cool it is. I ended up spending about $150 between a 1/3HP motor, switch, and buffing package and it really works.

Welcome to LJs…

-- Tom, Simsbury, CT

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