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wildwoods #1: Stick of walnut I cut this morning

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Blog entry by skeezaroonie posted 03-28-2011 12:02 AM 1400 reads 0 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch
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Not being able to cut up local wildwoods has been a real missing piece of my woodworking puzzle. Just recently I found a nearby Bandsawmill and now I’m like a kid at Christmas cadging local woods from my local area and having them sawn. All of the wood I have found and cut is deadfall and windfall. This includes a 30” diameter 6 foot section of Pecan from a neighbors field. The tree was blown over last spring and I cut the upper parts for my wood stove and barbecue smoker. While I was cutting the firewood I kept looking longingly at the remaining trunk and as soon as I discovered the sawyer I jumped on cutting up that main trunk. I also have some really beautiful red oak timber in my drying shed now waiting for me to resaw.

But when a friend told me about this walnut stump standing on the side of the road near his place I jumped all over it. The tree was struck by lightning and died a couple of years ago. A woodturner from near here managed to harvest most of the top of the tree last year but wasn’t able to handle the stump. At 34” this is actually a little over size for the TimberKing sawmill so I’ll have to do a little chainsaw trimming before it will fit. But WOW!, what a hunk of wood! You can see in the picture the upper section has been partly cut through before the previous cutter gave up with his smaller saw. I still have a section of about 52 inches of the main 34” diameter trunk to work with and I will do what I can to recover some nice bits from the upper fork crotch. Ought to be some pretty grain in there! Anyway, enough blabbering – here’s the pic of this bad boy.

-- Most men pursue pleasure with such breathless haste that they hurry past it. -Soren Kierkegaard



11 comments so far

View nobuckle's profile

nobuckle

1120 posts in 1413 days


#1 posted 03-28-2011 12:32 AM

Great find. Can’t wait to see the slabs you get from that.

-- Doug - Make an effort to live by the slogan "We try harder"

View therookie's profile

therookie

887 posts in 1479 days


#2 posted 03-28-2011 01:40 AM

Same here please post pics when you get them cut

-- http://aewoodworks.webs.com

View skeezaroonie's profile

skeezaroonie

23 posts in 1345 days


#3 posted 03-28-2011 02:29 AM

Will do (post pics of the slabs). And I can’t wait to see them myself.

-- Most men pursue pleasure with such breathless haste that they hurry past it. -Soren Kierkegaard

View riverb's profile

riverb

45 posts in 1326 days


#4 posted 03-28-2011 06:37 AM

where is the sawmill

View skeezaroonie's profile

skeezaroonie

23 posts in 1345 days


#5 posted 03-28-2011 06:51 AM

In Bremond, south of Marlin – he’s got lots of red cedar cut and available for sale (great prices, too) and will do custom cutting. Handy for me, only about 30 mins from my place.

-- Most men pursue pleasure with such breathless haste that they hurry past it. -Soren Kierkegaard

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14742 posts in 2328 days


#6 posted 03-28-2011 08:32 AM

Nice find ;-)

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View skeezaroonie's profile

skeezaroonie

23 posts in 1345 days


#7 posted 04-07-2011 05:03 AM

Well, finally got this little stick of walnut cut. Turns out it was too big to fit the carriage of the band mill I usually use. I was considering whittling the bole down a little with my chain saw but was really wanting to keep the live edges on at least some of the pieces. So, thanks to my wife, who can find anything on the ‘net, she found another sawyer near us who could handle the whole enchilada in one gulp, so to speak. Besides a band mill he also has a full Alaskan chain saw mill setup. I was also really worried about embedded metal – the tree stood right on the r.o.w. of a local rural road and I lost a little sleep worrying about just how much metal would be there to destroy expensive blades. Thank goodness there were only two nails and with metal detectors we were able to mostly avoid any serious problems.

Oh my gosh, did I ever get some amazing slabs of wood out of that thing. here’s a few pics:
The Alaskan mill at work:

My trailer is 5 feet wide – I couldn’t get two slabs side to side in there:

The really wild wood is from the first fork crotch – again, using that Alaskan mill sure made a sweet job of cutting that odd shaped thing up:

I’m pretty beat from unloading and stickering all this tonight but wanted to get a few of the shots up to share.

-- Most men pursue pleasure with such breathless haste that they hurry past it. -Soren Kierkegaard

View Mesquiteman's profile

Mesquiteman

54 posts in 2028 days


#8 posted 04-09-2011 04:07 PM

That is gorgeous wood, how long does it take to slab it out using the alaskan mill? I am thinking about by one for the larger logs I get.

View skeezaroonie's profile

skeezaroonie

23 posts in 1345 days


#9 posted 04-09-2011 05:34 PM

Hi Mesquiteman – Start to finish cutting the 50” long X 34” wide main bole into 2 1/2” slabs and then cutting that odd shaped crotch, again into mostly 2 1/2” slabs took about 3 hours, including unloading, setting up, etc. Each cut took maybe 5 min of actual cut time in the wood. I was sure impressed with the way the Alaskan mill could take on that odd shaped crotch wood section. No way would that fit on the Timber King or the Wood Mizer. I would have much preferred to not have had the main bole and the crotch as separate pieces but that’s what I get by following behind the person who harvested the top of that tree.

The saw was a Stihl 880 – a beast of a saw – with a 52” bar. The sawyer has several bars, up to a 72”, for that saw. I saw some pics of his cookie slabbing a 60-something inch diameter pecan bole with the big bar. I want to try and go see him when he starts attacking some of those humongous Mesquite burls although it will be painful to watch those things come into the light of day knowing I don’t have a snowball’s chance of being able to afford even a chunk of one.

-- Most men pursue pleasure with such breathless haste that they hurry past it. -Soren Kierkegaard

View wiswood2's profile

wiswood2

1101 posts in 2348 days


#10 posted 04-09-2011 06:12 PM

you got some realy nice wood there. I would hate to think how much it wood cost if you had to buy it from a lumber store,
Chuck

-- Chuck, wiswood2 www.wisconsinwoodchuck.com

View chuckyb's profile

chuckyb

5 posts in 1057 days


#11 posted 10-25-2011 04:46 PM

That’s probably too big for a regular sawmill eh?

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