LumberJocks

Busier than expected woodworking week #2: Gift box

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by siavosh posted 08-05-2013 01:49 AM 1131 reads 1 time favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Sharpening setup Part 2 of Busier than expected woodworking week series no next part

So originally the plan was to quickly clobber together an open box with any means necessary, be it nails, screws, glue, and sheer will power. But it quickly occured to me that this would be my family’s first exposure to this weird hobby their son had recently picked up and so pride (and joy) kept me adding to the project. Because I only had Sunday and a couple after work days to deliver the promised box, I didn’t bother taking any pictures for the first half of construction. By the end of Sunday, I actually got further along than expected and had a finger jointed box reinforced with screws on the sides and bottom.

Planning the edges flush—I experimented using the block plane on the pull stroke for this and it felt very natural. Since I do a lot of my work on the ground and use my arms and legs to hold things down, I think I’ll look into this approach more.

With the newly found extra time, I decided to make a top for it. And since my only experience for box tops are the sliding japanese toolbox lids, I set out to build one.

I had a redwood fence board from home depot in pretty rough condition. I did some planning, cross cutting, and to create a top wide enough for the box. I did notice that that the redwood lost a lot of its color after planing, I was hoping for a stronger contrast with the pine board I used for the rest of the box.

Planing paired edges for the glue up.

Cutting the top to length.

Next up was planning the top to a good width.

Measuring the position of the offset beams always makes me nervous, so I mocked up their positions to convince myself they’d slide ok.

I used bamboo nails (skewers) for the top lips.

Convinced of the fit, the top was glued up. I wish I could say, everything fit great, but there was a fair bit of planning and tweaking to make it work. The biggest lesson I relearned again, was one mistake in measurement or squareness, if not remedied, haunts the project to its end, if you ever reach it. The biggest mistake on this project was that the sides were not planed to the same thickness. I think my next tool purchase will be a marking gauge.

The final step was a few coats of shellac and a wax coat.

I was pretty happy with the end result, and I think my mom and dad really appreciated the hand made gift. It was a hectic week, but I enjoyed every moment. Thanks for reading :)

-- http://woodspotting.com/ -- Discover the most interesting woodworking blogs from around the world



5 comments so far

View shampeon's profile

shampeon

1715 posts in 1648 days


#1 posted 08-05-2013 05:05 PM

Nicely done, Siavosh.

Why not make a marking gauge? You’ve basically got all the tools you need to make one, so get some wood and a blade. If you need a blade, I can get you one.

-- ian | "You can't stop what's coming. It ain't all waiting on you. That's vanity."

View Dan Hux's profile

Dan Hux

577 posts in 2839 days


#2 posted 08-06-2013 12:41 AM

very cool box top,,I’m going to try this this type of top.

-- Dan Hux,,,,Raleigh, NC http://whitdaniel.com

View siavosh's profile

siavosh

674 posts in 1335 days


#3 posted 08-06-2013 03:52 AM

@Ian Thanks! That’s a actually a great idea. I was originally looking at the Hamilton marking gauge since all the reviews I’ve found have been very positive, but maybe I can find some hardwood and make a crude one for myself. Thanks for the blade offer, let me look around my toolbox to see if I can find something first. What do you typically recommend for the blade piece?

@Dan Thanks! I think the concept of the top is pretty elegant and functional—all inspiration from Odate’s book.

-- http://woodspotting.com/ -- Discover the most interesting woodworking blogs from around the world

View shampeon's profile

shampeon

1715 posts in 1648 days


#4 posted 08-06-2013 05:31 PM

Something made of decent steel is all you really need. An old jigsaw or reciprocating saw blade works great. Or a new one, too. An X-acto blade also works. They’re cheap.

I prefer the cutting edge to be curved rather than pointed. This allows you to use the gauge from either direction, and I think it handles deep pores better.

I’ve got some leftover wenge pieces from my marking gauge swap build you’re welcome to use.

-- ian | "You can't stop what's coming. It ain't all waiting on you. That's vanity."

View siavosh's profile

siavosh

674 posts in 1335 days


#5 posted 08-07-2013 06:42 AM

Ian – the offer is getting more and more tempting and I’d love to get more design thoughts from you on how to make a simple marking gauge given my limited hand tool set. I’m about to head out of town for a week, but if you don’t mind I might message you when I get back to take you up on the offer and get some design tips.

-- http://woodspotting.com/ -- Discover the most interesting woodworking blogs from around the world

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com