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Facets, the Next Logical Step #6: Dying the Veneer...... (Again??)

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Blog entry by shipwright posted 01-03-2011 06:17 AM 1529 reads 2 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 5: Alignment and Trimming the Marquetry Part 6 of Facets, the Next Logical Step series Part 7: Gluing Up the Dodecahedron »

God hates a coward, I’ve always said so with only a little experimentation , I decided to dive in and try out a few techniques to dye the assembled glue-up. The worst that could happen, I figured, would be that I’d screw up badly and I could still sand it out…... maybe. Or I suppose it could turn into a potato chip and never return to shape. The latter calamity I have new reason to believe is controllable with the hairdryer, so let’s get to it.

I got a late Christmas present right off the bat. It turns out that the urea-formaldehyde glue lines will stop dye from bleeding to the adjacent piece. When I had tried to dye assembled marquetry before, the dye had readily bled across CA and PVA glue lines. It may also be that this time the marquetry was only taped together when vacuum bagged to the substrate. That may have allowed a better glue line than the old method of gluing up the marquetry first. Anyway have a look at this photo. I’m intensifying the “rosewood” simulation and the glue line is holding perfectly, as long as my hand is steady enough not to cross it.

I was having so much fun with this today that I didn’t take many pictures. Just two actually. There isn’t much to show anyway. It’s just sort of watercolor painting except with aniline dyes and bits of wood, not that I’m any kind of watercolorist or anything but it was relatively simple and trouble free. If there’s interest I will do a set of the techniques I’m developing to do this at another time (when I figure out what these techniques are). The other big problem I was worried about was wood expansion from the dye making serious warps in the pieces. I used a lot less water and a lot more isopropyl alcohol this time and dried after each application and it was never an issue. Here’s the finished set. I may darken the center piece in a few places where it seems different from the side piece it abuts, but I may not . It looks quite natural when the angle is formed….. like the top is light and the side shadow. I think I’ll tape up and look at it one more tiome before I decide. Before you ask, the little caterpillar is inserted to cover a little “opportunity” I created at an earlier stage.

All in all not nearly as eventful as I thought it would be but interesting none the less. There’s sure a lot to learn here.

Thanks for looking in. Comments, critiques, advice or whatever …. all welcome

Keep smilin’

Paul

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/



9 comments so far

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

6058 posts in 2183 days


#1 posted 01-03-2011 02:08 PM

Thanks, Paul.
My knees quit shaking for you.
The center pieces do seem lighter.
Great discovery tip about the urea-formaldehyde glue.
Aside: Was watching Marc S. (Wood Whisperer) do a leaf inlay where his only coloration was sand toasting. He found the same shrinkage you did. Great minds!
An unqualified YES to your offer of a tutorial!!

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View SPalm's profile

SPalm

4941 posts in 2637 days


#2 posted 01-03-2011 03:44 PM

You are amazing.
The veins that you obtained in the center section are so cool.
Glad you all your surprises were good ones.

Steve

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

View GaryL's profile

GaryL

1080 posts in 1585 days


#3 posted 01-03-2011 04:03 PM

I’m sure the stress level must be dieing down a bit now. Glad to see your back on track.
Keep the photos coming. The detail work looks fantastic.

-- Gary; Marysville, MI...Involve your children in your projects as much as possible, the return is priceless.

View Steven Davis's profile

Steven Davis

112 posts in 1669 days


#4 posted 01-03-2011 07:23 PM

Do you think using thicker veneer would mitigate the warping issue?

Very, very interesting. Please do put together a technique blog!!

-- Steven Davis - see me at http://www.playnoevil.com/ and http://www.stelgames.com/

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

5320 posts in 1553 days


#5 posted 01-03-2011 07:29 PM

Steven, It would seem to me that thicker veneer would make it worse rather than better but it wasn’t an issue so I guess we won’t have to ponder that one.

Thanks for the comment.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View Pop's profile

Pop

419 posts in 2701 days


#6 posted 01-03-2011 07:44 PM

Shipwright, my 1 & only experience with dye was a disaster. What I did was dumb. I dyed a turned piece with alcohol based dye & then applied alcohol based friction polish. You can imagine the mess.

It seems you have mastered dye. Thanks for the info. It’ll still be a while before I try it again.

Pop

-- One who works with his hands is a laborer, his hands & head A craftsman, his hands, head & heart a artist

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

5320 posts in 1553 days


#7 posted 01-03-2011 07:47 PM

I’m just stumbling along here…. a long way from mastery but thanks for the kind words.
Maybe I can entice you to try some experimenting again… maybe??

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View Pop's profile

Pop

419 posts in 2701 days


#8 posted 01-03-2011 08:35 PM

Thanks Paul. At this time I’m working on a belated Christmas present & a paying gig. Then I’m back to rebuilding my shop cabinets. In about a year I plan to play a bit.

Pop

-- One who works with his hands is a laborer, his hands & head A craftsman, his hands, head & heart a artist

View Schwieb's profile

Schwieb

1579 posts in 2216 days


#9 posted 01-05-2011 01:50 AM

Hey Paul, I’ve been following this project and technique with great interest. You’re way over my head in the creativity of your projects and way better at photography and posting things than I am. You give us something to strive for. I can’t wait to see the finished product. You have peaked my interest in marquetry and the vacuum press is in the works. Thanks so much for posting.

-- Dr. Ken, Florida - Durch harte arbeit werden Träume wahr.

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