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My Journey As A Scroll Saw Pattern Designer #1024: Patience

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Blog entry by Sheila Landry (scrollgirl) posted 05-02-2013 11:31 AM 728 reads 0 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1023: Moving Forward Part 1024 of My Journey As A Scroll Saw Pattern Designer series Part 1025: Some Newsletter Issues »

I made a great deal of progress on one of my designs yesterday, and so far I am happy with how it was turning out. It is still in the drawing stages right now, and even though it is half drawn, I still don’t have a clear vision of what I want the final piece to be.

It used to bother me when something like this occurred. Many times when I create a design, I have a goal or a final vision of what I want the completed piece to look like. I have always heard that without a clear goal, it is difficult to progress, and I can see exactly what that means.

There was a point yesterday when I had some of the drawing completed, and I found myself staring at the computer screen, not knowing what to do next. The voices in my head that usually guide me through this process had obviously gone to tea, taking a break from the work they were commissioned to do. I followed their lead and checked my emails and did some other things for a few minutes. When I returned to my computer I was able to move ahead slightly, having another idea of what I may want to do for this piece. That occupied me for another stretch of time, and while I finished that next section, I was thinking of the one to follow.

Slowly the fog was lifting, but it was being somewhat stubborn and taking its time.

But instead of forcing it, I tried to relax and allow it to come on its own. Fortunately, the deadline for this design is reasonable, and not so close that I need to push it forward too quickly. That alone is a relief, as I know when I am patient and calm and have the awareness to do so, allowing things to progress naturally produces far better results. Perhaps that is why as we age we begin to realize the great value of being patient. It isn’t because we have become lethargic and lost our passion, but more so I believe because we have had enough experience to know that some things just can’t be rushed, and if we give them room to develop and grow, we will be rewarded.

We can’t force the fog to lift, any more than we can make the rain fall or the sun shine. Part of being experienced is knowing that some of the aspects of what we do cannot be changed, no matter how we try. There are times to push forward and there are also times to sit back and observe and allow things to gel. Knowing when to do which is something that only comes with time.

I am particularly conscious of these things because the project I am creating is for submitting to a new source. It isn’t that I ever feel laid back with a submission, but there is somewhat of a comfort in submitting to a company that I am familiar with. Trying something new is always a source of some anxiety, as I just don’t know what to expect.

While I try to do my best on all of my designs, it is important for me to present a good first impression. While I am well-established in some areas, this branching out makes me feel like I am somewhat of a rookie. I really want them to like what I do.

So moving ahead carefully and thoughtfully is a good thing. It causes us to take a breath and really be aware of what we are doing. It removes the “routine” from our jobs and our lives and once again adds to the excitement and exhilaration of being creative.

Some people look at that as stressful. For myself, I choose to look at it as an opportunity to renew my enthusiasm for what I do. Sometimes we all need that.

So I will continue on today with my design, slowly and cautiously. As I maneuver through the fog, I will take each step with care, knowing that eventually it will lift. And when it does, I will hopefully be left with something that I can be proud of.

Have a wonderful day. Enjoy your journey.

”The fog comes on little cat feet. It sits looking over harbor and city on silent haunches and then moves on.” – Carl Sandburg

-- Designer/Artist/Teacher. Owner of Sheila Landry Designs (http://www.sheilalandrydesigns.com) Scroll saw, wood working and painting patterns and surfaces. "Knowledge is Power"



9 comments so far

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6648 posts in 2635 days


#1 posted 05-02-2013 02:29 PM

Hi Sheila,

Can you hear the voices in my head too?

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)'s profile

Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)

7660 posts in 1575 days


#2 posted 05-02-2013 02:33 PM

Of course not silly! Those our YOUR voices! Mine only talk to me and I am assuming you have your own detailed conversations with yours!

;) Sheila

-- Designer/Artist/Teacher. Owner of Sheila Landry Designs (http://www.sheilalandrydesigns.com) Scroll saw, wood working and painting patterns and surfaces. "Knowledge is Power"

View Celticscroller's profile

Celticscroller

805 posts in 728 days


#3 posted 05-02-2013 03:54 PM

Hi Sheila, I have no doubt that the fog will clear and the design you come up with will be as wonderful as ever. Have fun with the process.
We are up to 16 degrees here today and getting warmer on the weekend. Yea! All doors in the workshop will be open!
Enjoy your day.

-- Anna http://richmondcarvers.com/

View Jay Wells's profile

Jay Wells

58 posts in 547 days


#4 posted 05-02-2013 10:46 PM

Do you find it harder to create on a.computer screen than with a pad and pencil?

-- Find your limitations, and ignore them!

View Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)'s profile

Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)

7660 posts in 1575 days


#5 posted 05-02-2013 11:07 PM

Hi, Jay:
Actually, I do about 90% of my drawing on the computer. I use a Wacom tablet and pen mouse and I draw with my mouse. It took a while to get used to the pen as a mouse, but once I did I will never go back. (My Wacom tablet comes with a cordless mouse, too and I use it if I carry my pen off , which is a habit I have, but not for anything long term) I have the Intous3 Tablet:

When it dies, I will probably go to an Intous5. I like the smaller 3” x 5” tablets because the movement of your hand is very natural to me on the smaller surface. I don’t think I would do well with a larger tablet, although many people really like them. I think Sue Mey uses a larger one for her drawing. It is a personal preference, I think.

I do draw with pencil and paper when I go to places like the beach, but then I scan in the drawings and trace them with the pen mouse anyway for the cleanest lines. There is really no OCR program that does a great job of turning raster into vector, so I just draw with Illustrator from the get go. My screen and seating area is really comfortable and easy to be at for long hours, so that is a plus. too. :)

Sorry for such a long answer. I suppose there is a lot to it.

Take care, Sheila

-- Designer/Artist/Teacher. Owner of Sheila Landry Designs (http://www.sheilalandrydesigns.com) Scroll saw, wood working and painting patterns and surfaces. "Knowledge is Power"

View Jay Wells's profile

Jay Wells

58 posts in 547 days


#6 posted 05-03-2013 10:54 AM

Thanks for the long answer. It’s nice when someone at your level will take the time to answer in such detail.

-- Find your limitations, and ignore them!

View Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)'s profile

Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)

7660 posts in 1575 days


#7 posted 05-03-2013 11:00 AM

We are all here to help each other. :) Sometimes I get bogged down, but I try to do my best. Thanks so much!

Sheila

-- Designer/Artist/Teacher. Owner of Sheila Landry Designs (http://www.sheilalandrydesigns.com) Scroll saw, wood working and painting patterns and surfaces. "Knowledge is Power"

View Roger's profile

Roger

14592 posts in 1459 days


#8 posted 05-04-2013 01:17 PM

I believe that fog is like the inside o my head…. lol
But, this is what it looks like in Kentucky

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Kentuk55@bellsouth.net

View Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)'s profile

Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)

7660 posts in 1575 days


#9 posted 05-05-2013 09:48 AM

That is pretty! Kentucky is beautiful. I have been there several times and I loved it. :)

Sheila

-- Designer/Artist/Teacher. Owner of Sheila Landry Designs (http://www.sheilalandrydesigns.com) Scroll saw, wood working and painting patterns and surfaces. "Knowledge is Power"

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