LumberJocks

My Journey As A Scroll Saw Pattern Designer #764: Part 2 of the "Reindeer Games" Ornament Video

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by Sheila Landry (scrollgirl) posted 07-16-2012 11:37 AM 3605 reads 0 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 763: Scrollgirl/Videogirl Part 764 of My Journey As A Scroll Saw Pattern Designer series Part 765: Part 3 of the "Reindeer Games" Ornament Video »

This morning I will be brief (really!) I did get the second part of the video done and uploaded. It is about 16 minutes long and took over 2 hours to upload last night!

I am continuing to get the subsequent parts ready, so they will be up soon.

But for now, the video is here:

http://youtu.be/6XFIER1ZFG4

You can also watch it here if you like:

Thanks for all the good feedback on yesterdays’ post. I do appreciate it a lot. I will be incorporating these into the class on Lumberjocks.com soon.

Have a great Monday!

-- Designer/Artist/Teacher. Owner of Sheila Landry Designs (http://www.sheilalandrydesigns.com) Scroll saw, wood working and painting patterns and surfaces. "Knowledge is Power"



13 comments so far

View Roger's profile

Roger

15362 posts in 1556 days


#1 posted 07-16-2012 11:57 AM

Nice video Sheila. You make it look ez.. I see why you like that saw. The ez on, ez off blade is a good feature of it. Really some super-fine cuts. Thnx fer the “how-to”

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Kentuk55@bellsouth.net

View KnotCurser's profile

KnotCurser

1852 posts in 1821 days


#2 posted 07-16-2012 12:27 PM

Great video – I am sure a ton of people will learn something from this!

It’s funny, but I do 99% of my cuts the same exact way and I never took a lesson – I guess it makes sense when you look at it in the light of accuracy and effeciency.

I will be very interested in your follow-ups!

Thanks!

-bob

-- Robert Rhoades WoodWorks / Email: rrww@rhoadesclan.com / www.rhoadesclan.com

View Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)'s profile

Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)

7902 posts in 1672 days


#3 posted 07-16-2012 12:31 PM

Thanks, Roger and Bob!

I suppose the only ‘lessons’ I had were from the “Trial and Error” school. While I certainly heard different tips over time, most of what I know came from just trying one thing or another and figuring out what works best. I do hope that others can learn from what I am showing them here. As I said before, there are many different ways to do the same thing. People need to try different methods and figure out what works best for them. What one may like, another may feel uncomfortable doing. These are techniques that work well for me and I hope by sharing them I am helping other have a positive experience at the saw. :)

Have a great day!

-- Designer/Artist/Teacher. Owner of Sheila Landry Designs (http://www.sheilalandrydesigns.com) Scroll saw, wood working and painting patterns and surfaces. "Knowledge is Power"

View BritBoxmaker's profile

BritBoxmaker

4448 posts in 1788 days


#4 posted 07-16-2012 12:38 PM

Thats not slow, thats faster than my very fast. You are just an expert. This is also indicated by the way you decide which way to go as you are cutting. I could watch that for hours. On the serious side I like your way of feeding back into the design by trying it and assessing just how things are in the real world. Oh, and that is one sharp star.

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

View Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)'s profile

Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)

7902 posts in 1672 days


#5 posted 07-16-2012 12:48 PM

Thanks, Martyn. Sometimes cutting the design isn’t necessary, when I ‘know’ it will work, but most of the time I like to cut it out to make sure that others can do it too. Here is an example of the pattern:

From the image there looks like plenty of space for the wood to hold on. When I draw on the screen, it is at least magnified this much when I am working with it.

But in reality, the amount holding on is a bit thin for my taste. I find by cutting it that in needs a little more to hold on to so I bump the line a little before I send out the final pattern.

I know this may seem as ‘overkill’ to some, as many other designer don’t actually cut most of their patterns to test them, but this insures me that they will be ‘doable’ and then when I am asked questions, I can answer them from first-hand knowledge.

Besides . . . I LIKE scroll sawing and it is a good excuse to spend some time making fun things. Quite a perk, I think.

I am glad you enjoyed the video. There are several more to come. :)

Sheila

-- Designer/Artist/Teacher. Owner of Sheila Landry Designs (http://www.sheilalandrydesigns.com) Scroll saw, wood working and painting patterns and surfaces. "Knowledge is Power"

View Rick13403's profile

Rick13403

215 posts in 2257 days


#6 posted 07-16-2012 01:07 PM

Great job on the videos Sheila. Even though I’ve been scrolling for years, I find many helpful tips in the video and in your instructions with the pattern.
Rick

-- Rick - DeWalt 788 - www.thescrollerandtoler.com

View Jamie Speirs's profile

Jamie Speirs

4163 posts in 1609 days


#7 posted 07-16-2012 01:28 PM

Sheila that was great

I can see the dust being taken off my scroll saw

I like the fact that the video is done in real time

and not as a voice over, I felt part of it.

Your doing a wonderful job of your videos

Looking forward to part #3

Jamie

-- Who is the happiest of men? He who values the merits of others, and in their pleasure takes joy, even as though 'twere his own. --Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

View MichaelAgate's profile

MichaelAgate

398 posts in 1076 days


#8 posted 07-16-2012 06:39 PM

Great how to – Sheila. Really enjoyed watching. Can’t beat an Excalibur, especially with your talent behind it.

-- Michael and Matthew

View BritBoxmaker's profile

BritBoxmaker

4448 posts in 1788 days


#9 posted 07-16-2012 07:04 PM

Yes you’re right, Jamie. Its almost like personal (one to one) tuition.

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

View scoops's profile

scoops

56 posts in 1176 days


#10 posted 07-17-2012 12:36 AM

Sheila, thanks for the video, always good to see how you do things, and it came just in time….as I mentioned to you before, I am actually conducting a one day lesson for beginners next Tuesday, so you’ve given me some more useful tips! Question though, I notice you are still feeding the blade from underneath? As an Excalibur owner myself I’ve always thought one of the big advantages with an Ex. is the fact you can feed the blade from the top? Is it just because you’re used to doing it that way?

-- yesterday today was tomorrow

View Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)'s profile

Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)

7902 posts in 1672 days


#11 posted 07-17-2012 12:41 AM

Yes, I am a ‘bottom feeder’. Sometimes when I try to feed from the top, I wind up bending the blade. I don’t always lift the arm up when I change the blade (I suppose I hardly ever do on the smaller pieces) and I think that comes from my many years on the DeWalt when it didn’t have the Easy Lift arm. Sometimes we get into habits and they are hard to change. Ray from Seyco told me that he noticed in one of the videos that I didn’t lift the arm and wondered why too. Maybe I am just lazy! LOL

I hear from people that feed from both top and bottom and I like to tell people that whatever works for them is the best way. I don’t think there is a ‘right’ or ‘wrong’ in it – just a ‘difference’. :) I am glad you enjoy the demos.

Sheila

-- Designer/Artist/Teacher. Owner of Sheila Landry Designs (http://www.sheilalandrydesigns.com) Scroll saw, wood working and painting patterns and surfaces. "Knowledge is Power"

View KnotCurser's profile

KnotCurser

1852 posts in 1821 days


#12 posted 07-17-2012 01:15 AM

Scoops and Sheila,

I have an “original” model Dewalt and I have always used a top feed method. I never took a lesson and just figured that it would be easier to not have to look under the piece every time so I got used to unhooking the bottom and pulling the blade up through the workpiece.

I do it so quickly now that I don’t even think about where to put my fingers under the table, etc….. I timed myself last week and can have a blade re-threaded and tensioned in about 10 seconds. :-) Of course, I did this very maneuver thousands of times…....

As Sheila stated, have your pupils try both ways and use whatever they feel more comfortable with – just let them know that like everything else, they will get quicker and more relaxed with a lot of practice.

Good luck on the class!

-bob

-- Robert Rhoades WoodWorks / Email: rrww@rhoadesclan.com / www.rhoadesclan.com

View Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)'s profile

Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)

7902 posts in 1672 days


#13 posted 07-17-2012 10:04 AM

My DeWalt is the “original” (Type 1 motor) also. I have had it for about 14 years now and for the most part, there it is trouble free. When I got the Excalibur, I did notice that there was a bit of a difference, but I don’t know whether to attribute that to the DeWalt’s age and amount of use it had under its belt or what. I’ll tell you though – I am pretty happy that I kept it around and didn’t sell it when I got the new one. It is a great backup saw to have and when I have to do stuff like the production pieces we have been cutting, it preforms good. It is a bit louder than the Excalibur, but again, that is probably in part because of its age. All in all I am happy (and spoiled) to have the two – especially now that Keith is helping me with the production cutting. My only problem with recommending the DeWalt saws now is that they are made much differently than mine. I have heard of much more trouble people have had with them from the get go and they are made cheaper (they weigh something like 13 lbs LESS than the Type 1 saws) It is hard to recommend something that I am unsure of.

Sheila

-- Designer/Artist/Teacher. Owner of Sheila Landry Designs (http://www.sheilalandrydesigns.com) Scroll saw, wood working and painting patterns and surfaces. "Knowledge is Power"

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase