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My Journey As A Scroll Saw Pattern Designer #321: I Need Some Advice from You

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Blog entry by Sheila Landry (scrollgirl) posted 1219 days ago 2615 reads 0 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 320: Pacing Yourself Part 321 of My Journey As A Scroll Saw Pattern Designer series Part 322: More Cutting »

OK, now it is my turn to have the questions. I know there are many seasoned woodworkers out there that will hopefully be able to help me with this:

What do I do to get the dark, moldy-looking streaks out of oak? I did my usual of Googling it, and most of the responses said to use some bleach, but I don’t want to ruin the natural color of the oak or have it blotchy or streaky.

Let me tell you more about the wood:

I have a couple of boards, let’s say half an inch thick and about 8-9 inches wide in three to four foot lengths that have some of these streaks on them. I am thinking it was because when we stacked them they may have been slightly cupped and twisted so in an effort to straighten them out, we sprayed them with a mist of water and stored them weighted flat. (No, we didn’t put stickers between them – probably part of the problem)

Now there are blackish streaks in the grain of the wood. Not very pretty.

I want to use this wood for a project that is still on the drawing board, but should be ready to cut by the end of the week. I was planning to finish it with my usual mineral oil followed by spray shellac, as the project will not be handled much and that always give the grain of the wood a pleasing look. But will that stop the wood from decaying further? Or should I do something else?

I have some sanding sealer here that I haven’t tried yet. I was wondering if the sanding sealer would retard any of the mold from coming back better. I know that Martyn uses that all the time and I love the way it brings out the grain with his beautiful projects. I wonder if that would do.

I also want to note that this project will be glued together. I would prefer to glue it after the sanding sealer, if possible because it will be much easier to finish the pieces before gluing them together. Is that OK? Or should I go another route?

I would appreciate any and all advice on this matter. If you all don’t think it is possible to fix this problem in the next day or so, then I certainly have some other wood I could use. I just liked the look of the oak and really wanted to use it. I thank you in advance for your help in this matter.

Today I get to cut out the candle tray that I drew up yesterday. I pretty much have the drawing finished, with just a bit more to do today. I can’t wait to use the saw again and play with it. I found out that my light has been shipped and soon I will be able to use that instead of the task lamp with the magnets on the bottom that I have been using up to this point. I am excited.

I took the car in for the new break pads yesterday and found out that the reason they wore so fast was because the one caliper had been damaged and wore the pad on an angle. The other front wheel was fine and barely worn, while this one was completely done. They didn’t mention that when we had the car in Chicago. Only that I would be needing new breaks soon. Apparently they only took off one wheel to check them. :(

So they won’t be able to do the work until tomorrow. I left the car there because there was no point in driving it anymore with it in that condition. It wasn’t safe and I didn’t want to do further damage. It seems like I am really getting hit right now with a lot of stuff. It is good motivation to really get moving to make some more new patterns. I am very overdue for a site update, as I didn’t do so in April, but I don’t really have many new things to put on it. I would like to change the sales though and put a new free pattern for my customers to work on and update them with a newsletter. I have received a couple of emails asking if they missed their April issue. I am happy that people care. :)

So a busy day is ahead of me. It will be nice to see the next project come to life. On paper it looks nice, but it always is a thrill to see it in wood.

I hope everyone has a good day. My heart goes out to my friends in the States who have been hit with all the rain, tornadoes and flooding. I hope you are all safe and sound.

Let me know about the oak issue if you have time. I really would appreciate it a lot.

Thanks so much!

-- Designer/Artist/Teacher. Owner of Sheila Landry Designs (http://www.sheilalandrydesigns.com) Scroll saw, wood working and painting patterns and surfaces. "Knowledge is Power"



14 comments so far

View KnotCurser's profile

KnotCurser

1813 posts in 1700 days


#1 posted 1219 days ago

How deep does the stain go? Can you run it through a planer?

-bob

-- Robert Rhoades WoodWorks / Email: rrww@rhoadesclan.com / www.rhoadesclan.com

View Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)'s profile

Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)

7588 posts in 1551 days


#2 posted 1219 days ago

No Bob, it is already planed to about 1/2 inch. I don’t think the stain goes very far down, but I am not sure. It isn’t dark black or anything like that, just grey-ish.

Sheila

-- Designer/Artist/Teacher. Owner of Sheila Landry Designs (http://www.sheilalandrydesigns.com) Scroll saw, wood working and painting patterns and surfaces. "Knowledge is Power"

View patron's profile

patron

13017 posts in 1973 days


#3 posted 1219 days ago

oak + water = black stain

happens everytime
either stain everything first
or use other wood

i know we have all seen
the black ring
under flower pots
on oak furniture
or flooring

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View KnotCurser's profile

KnotCurser

1813 posts in 1700 days


#4 posted 1219 days ago

Well, if you can’t take the top layer of wood off then you really don’t have much of a choice…....

If this is indeed caused by water, here’s what I would do…......

First, try plain ol’ white vinegar. Soak the area and let it sit for a few minutes. If this seems to work, you are in luck!

Next strongest would be a 50/50 solution of household bleach and water. Let that sit and see what happens.

If you REALLY need something stronger, then go to oxalic acid – just make sure you have more vinegar on-hand to neutralize the acid – wash it very well with water afterward.

Good luck!

-bob

-- Robert Rhoades WoodWorks / Email: rrww@rhoadesclan.com / www.rhoadesclan.com

View Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)'s profile

Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)

7588 posts in 1551 days


#5 posted 1219 days ago

What a foolish girl I am! You are right Patron! The minute you mentioned the stains on the oak from glasses or vases, it clicked.

I don’t know why I didn’t think of that at the time. :(

I will give the suggestions a try and report back. Hopefully, it isn’t deep enough where I can’t arrest it without planing it again. If it is, I suppose I will have to plane it to 1/8” and use it for ornaments.

Thanks for your suggestions!

Sheila :)

-- Designer/Artist/Teacher. Owner of Sheila Landry Designs (http://www.sheilalandrydesigns.com) Scroll saw, wood working and painting patterns and surfaces. "Knowledge is Power"

View rance's profile

rance

4130 posts in 1792 days


#6 posted 1219 days ago

If planing it down works, you could then laminate two fo them together to get the thickness back. Twice the wood(originally), but one solution. You’d likely not see the seam on the edge if you selected your boards carefully.

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

View Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)'s profile

Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)

7588 posts in 1551 days


#7 posted 1219 days ago

Thanks, Rance. That is an idea that I may use later on. For this project though, I plan on shaping it after cutting with the Dremel and I really want it to be a solid piece of wood. I also don’t think I would be able to laminate it together perfectly because of my limited shop and resources.

I have plenty of other species that I can choose from. I just had oak in my mind and thought it would be a good time to try to correct the problem I had with this piece.

Who knows – maybe I will learn something in the process. I already have! :D

Sheila

-- Designer/Artist/Teacher. Owner of Sheila Landry Designs (http://www.sheilalandrydesigns.com) Scroll saw, wood working and painting patterns and surfaces. "Knowledge is Power"

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1747 days


#8 posted 1219 days ago

I think you a stucked with the oak at is unless you will try to bleach it
as knotcurser say

didn´t you had a complete overhoul of the car before your trip incl. the breakes
when they had it in …... then they shuold have noticed how the worn had started then
I don´t want to blaime any mec. but over the years it always have seem to me its there achilles problem
to check the brakes proppebly …. why it is so I don´t know …...maybee a nature-law I´m not aware of :-)
but still a pain in the …...
and before anybody start to kick me ….....I know how to repair brakes and the rest of the undercariage
on a car .... I just choose not to do it anymore if I can avoid it :-)

have a great day
Dennis

View Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)'s profile

Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)

7588 posts in 1551 days


#9 posted 1219 days ago

Yes, Dennis:
Everything was checked before we left. But the one caliper was bad and caused the one pad to wear unevenly and at an angle. That could have happened early on in the trip and certainly by the end of our journey could have done this much damage. Don’t forget we traveled 5,000 miles in three weeks, with much of it through the mountains (that’s miles, not kilometers!)

I am once again happy that I caught it in time before it damaged the rotor. I suppose with older cars, things like this are to be expected.

Since the car is paid for, I suppose that a couple hundred of dollars in maintenance and repairs once or twice a year isn’t too bad. (Pink Cloud Alert!) The payments for it were nearly $600 (US) a month during the time it took me to pay it off, so I still have to figure I am ahead! A bit here and there for keeping it in good repair is still much better than making those monthly payments. I was just surprised and being tax month and all in both countries, wish it weren’t so.

Oh well . . . . what can you do?

:) Sheila

-- Designer/Artist/Teacher. Owner of Sheila Landry Designs (http://www.sheilalandrydesigns.com) Scroll saw, wood working and painting patterns and surfaces. "Knowledge is Power"

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1747 days


#10 posted 1219 days ago

I did noticed you travel in miles ….lol
and you are right mautains is hard on the brakes as if it is in the city´s
you don´t have to have the alert on with those few miles you drive a year
you proppebly have a very cheap cars for years to come
one thing I will say is … now it has started with that caliber then just have
one eye on it if they havn´t changed it all it can continue to come back
I don´t say it will ….just have it in your mind those cupple of times a year you have
the car to sevice and demand they take of the wheels when they check the brakes
if I just was at your house it wuoldn´t take me two minuts to teach you what to look for

take care
Dennis

View Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)'s profile

Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)

7588 posts in 1551 days


#11 posted 1219 days ago

I am showing some pictures of the extent of the problem. As you can see, it is not a lot. Mostly it is on the edge and not very predominant. However, I don’t wish to take the time to use this wood for a project if it will continue to decay.

I am going to use the bleaching method and see if that would work. But I still need to know if afterword, I will be able to finish it ‘normally’ with oil and spray shellac, or do I need to use something else that would retard further growth. Would sanding sealer suffice?

Sheila

-- Designer/Artist/Teacher. Owner of Sheila Landry Designs (http://www.sheilalandrydesigns.com) Scroll saw, wood working and painting patterns and surfaces. "Knowledge is Power"

View KnotCurser's profile

KnotCurser

1813 posts in 1700 days


#12 posted 1219 days ago

After seeing your pictures, I most certainly wouldn’t worry about any future “growth” if the wood is indeed dry. This isn’t mold but a water stain, and a rather mild one at that.

Try this – prepare a section including the stain the way you normally would, just skip the cutting part. Then simply treat the wood as you normally do. In my case it would be a soak in lemon oil and maybe spray shellac afterward.

I’ll bet you won’t even notice the stain – it will blend right in. If you DO notice something, it will appear to be a natural part of the wood’s color.

Take a peek at one of my previous works – there is ‘something’ below the cutout as well as running by his left shoulder. Stain? Natural? Don’t know, but I like it all the same! ;-)

-bob

-- Robert Rhoades WoodWorks / Email: rrww@rhoadesclan.com / www.rhoadesclan.com

View tdv's profile

tdv

1114 posts in 1702 days


#13 posted 1219 days ago

Sheila it doesn’t look heavily stained, have you tried working a small area with a cabinet scraper to see if it can easily be removed? This is a bit late but a tip for future reference I use a lot of old church oak & one thing I always make a point of when introducing water to oak is to make sure I use distilled water. It’s the impurities, water company chemicals (like flouride) & particularly iron from the inside of mains waterpipes that creates that staining. If you’ve ever seen a steel screw or nail that has been in oak for some time you’ll recognise the same black mark it’s not rot it’s a chemical reaction
hope you can remove it let us know how you get on I hope it all helps
Best
Trevor

-- God created wood that we may create. Trevor East Yorkshire UK

View BigTiny's profile

BigTiny

1664 posts in 1520 days


#14 posted 1219 days ago

Hi Sheila.

Garages and dealerships as a practice only check one wheel’s brake for a wear check, usually the driver’s side front as the front takes more wear. If there is damage, that’s another thing entirely. Make sure to change both sides at once. You don’t have to do all four if the others don’t need it, but it’s important to change both fronts or both backs at the same time. You may have to have your disk turned on the lathe or even replaced if the uneven pressure has caused excessive wear or uneven wear.

As for bleaching wood, if you can find some oxalic acid crystals, mix about a teaspoon in 8 ounces of distilled water and wipe it on like you would water to raise the grain for sanding. Takes out most stains in wood while leaving the appearance mostly unaffected. Might have to use more than once. When it’s dry, treat as normal for finishing.

Paul

-- The nicer the nice, the higher the price!

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