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My Journey As A Scroll Saw Pattern Designer #249: One More Day of Instructions

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Blog entry by Sheila Landry (scrollgirl) posted 02-07-2011 01:25 PM 3972 reads 0 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 248: Assessing Information Part 249 of My Journey As A Scroll Saw Pattern Designer series Part 250: The Business of Scroll Sawing »

Well, the site update is all completed and everything is up and running. All the new patterns have instructions and they are all checked over and ready to go. Even the Spring catalog is completed and posted and ready for download. It was really a busy weekend.

My plans for yesterday of painting and finishing the little ornaments seemed to go by the wayside. I did decide to offer up the little heart tray to my mailing list customers, which means I needed to make the picture in Photoshop for the pattern cover, which was a bit quicker than cutting it and finishing it. I usually don’t do that, but it was a last minute decision and I wanted to offer it up free for the mailing list people and include it in this mailing so I figured it was Photoshop or delay the update another day.

The design was simple and it wasn’t something that I needed to cut to insure that it would work, as the other trays with the same motif were fine so I figured it was better than not having it at all. Here are the results of my efforts:

Although I much prefer really cutting something to just drawing them up in Photoshop, it does OK in a pinch. Since the pattern is being given away for free, I don’t think anyone will mind. Many designers do most of their patterns this way. I will, however cut it out and replace the cover picture soon. I will just feel better about it.

Today I will be writing the final set of instructions for the Bee Hive Candle Tray and preparing it to be mailed out tomorrow to the magazine with another plaque that my partner made that was accepted. I still need to color correct the photographs and write the instructions which will take a couple of hours at least. Preparing a pattern for the magazine is far more detailed than what I do for pattern packets and I want to be sure that everything is correct.

I also have some correspondence to work on and some further investigation into the different saws. I have the name of a contact at General International and I want to talk to him about the Excalibur. I don’t know if he ultimately will be the one to talk to, but he should be able t set me on the right track. I don’t know their policies regarding supplying tools for shows and such but I am sure that I will find out.

I hope to have these things tied up by the end of the day today. I am anxious to really start making out a lesson plan in detail for the classes. Once these last few things are off the books, I can really start to concentrate on getting things ready. I am about seven weeks away from the show and the time will certainly pass quickly. Before I know it I will be packing up to leave.

I also need to decide which projects to bring there for my own display. Jean (the woman who got me involved with it in the first place) wants me to bring my skating pond set. She tells me that many people in her clubs and groups are interested in painting and finishing and it would be good to have it there. I also need to talk to DecoArt to see if they can provide some samples of the Antiquing and Staining Gel. I want to demonstrate how it works in one of the classes and it would be great if they had some small bottles for people to take home and try. They are wonderful with supporting things such as this and I think it would bring them a lot of business. I at least need to get some literature to pass out on their products.

I also need to touch base with my representative from Olsen scroll saw blades. He had told me he would be happy to provide samples of blades for me to give out at the show. Those of you who read regularly have heard me talk of how I really think their blades are the best and I am very happy to give out samples and let others try them. I think people will be surprised at the difference they will make.

One other thing that I want to work on is making a sign for my booth. Of course, it needs to be scroll sawn, but I want it to be something really nice. I am wondering though if I shouldn’t just use the font that I normally use on my letterhead and all my patterns and on my site. It is something that people are familiar with and I want to be consistent. Cutting letters is one of my favorite things and I think I can make something that looks really nice for the show. It will be a nice added touch.

So there is lots to do today and many details to attend to. So much for taking the day and painting and designing yesterday. :) But that is what priorities are all about. There will be time for that later on and it feels good to get these important business things in order and accomplish them.

Have a wonderful and happy Monday!

-- Designer/Artist/Teacher. Owner of Sheila Landry Designs (http://www.sheilalandrydesigns.com) Scroll saw, wood working and painting patterns and surfaces. "Knowledge is Power"



7 comments so far

View tdv's profile

tdv

1130 posts in 1818 days


#1 posted 02-07-2011 01:51 PM

That really is a beautiful design Sheila there’s a lot of work & planning gone into that, you’re good
Best
Trevor

-- God created wood that we may create. Trevor East Yorkshire UK

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6699 posts in 2728 days


#2 posted 02-07-2011 02:34 PM

Hi Sheila;

You drew that in photoshop? Man, I have a lot to learn about that program!

I think using the same font for the sign is a good idea. (Branding and all that)

You still need to send me a small banner for my website. (If you would like).

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)'s profile

Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)

7895 posts in 1668 days


#3 posted 02-07-2011 02:47 PM

Yep, Lee. That was a quick one though. I only do it on occasion when I am absolutely sure that the piece will cut well. I get such a backlog of prototypes here when I am in a productive mode and I don’t know what to do with them. Lots of friends and family get nice gifts but they are probably tired of getting them. lol

It is time consuming to sell everything and once the picture is taken, stuff usually gets packed away in a box. So for some of the flat plaques and stuff, we have taken to doing them up in Photoshop on occasion. This one came out OK but I didn’t toil on it because I know I am going to be cutting out the design soon and replacing it with a real picture. Here is an example of one of the better ones:

It is probably about 15 (yes, fifteen) layers of work. I actually do the line work in Illustrator and then the picture in Photoshop. We got this giant box of veneer from Lee Valley and scanned in loads of species of wood to use for these types of pictures. It is just like picking wood for a real project – Lots of fun! Doing something like this though sometimes takes as much time as cutting out the original. LOL But it is fun to do too. (Did I ever say I love computers?)

Thank you too on the banner. I will get that to you today! :)

Sheila

-- Designer/Artist/Teacher. Owner of Sheila Landry Designs (http://www.sheilalandrydesigns.com) Scroll saw, wood working and painting patterns and surfaces. "Knowledge is Power"

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6699 posts in 2728 days


#4 posted 02-08-2011 02:43 PM

Hi Sheila;

That’s pretty amazing. I’m thinking, with your explaination, I could do the same process. Never crossed my mind to do it before though. The hard part for me would be the actual drawing in illustrator.

That was a great idea to scan in a bunch of veneers. Can’t get much more realistic than that.

I’ll look for for the banner, as I’ll be working on my website this week.

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)'s profile

Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)

7895 posts in 1668 days


#5 posted 02-09-2011 03:08 AM

There are loads and loads of free tutorials on the Adobe suite at Adobe.com and all over the web. I try to look at them when I have time. Those programs are incredible and I am sure that I probably use 1/1000 of what they have to offer. There is a filter in Photoshop that is my favorite called “lens correction” that really helps you remove lens distortion from pictures (Like when a square box looks bloated a bit in pictures). That alone has helped so many of my pictures look nice. There are hundreds of things that make even crummy pictures look good. It is another form of art as far as I am concerned. I wish I had time to play with it more (why aren’t there 48 hours in a day anyway??)

Check out the videos though. They are really cool. :)

Sheila

-- Designer/Artist/Teacher. Owner of Sheila Landry Designs (http://www.sheilalandrydesigns.com) Scroll saw, wood working and painting patterns and surfaces. "Knowledge is Power"

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6699 posts in 2728 days


#6 posted 02-10-2011 04:42 AM

Hi Sheila;

I subscribe to an online video service that has training videos for just about every program out there. I think it’s $40.00 a month, but they’re high quality, and VERY thorough.

I’ve been studying Dreamweaver for about a month now, as time permits. There are over a hundred hours of training, just on Dreamweaver. Too bad my memory sucks! LOL Seems I forget as quick as I learn it.

Photoshop is next. It will be nice to have two programs I can’t remember how to use.

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)'s profile

Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)

7895 posts in 1668 days


#7 posted 02-10-2011 04:58 AM

LOL, Lee! I hear you! I signed up for Adobe online courses a couple of years ago. You paid something like $250 for a year of access to several program classes. You learn at your own pace and they were really nice. But you couldn’t go to fast because it was a LOT of information . I felt just like you did. There was so much information in each lesson that these poor old brain cells were overloaded! I did start to write stuff down, but eventually things got in the way and I didn’t really continue with it.

I find the best way that I retained stuff was using the help files when I was doing stuff. That way I could apply what I learned to what I was actually doing and it stuck better.

These recent videos however were really well done and showed a lot of great features that I would like to apply to future work. I just may need to watch them a few times to get the hang of things. :)

Sheila

-- Designer/Artist/Teacher. Owner of Sheila Landry Designs (http://www.sheilalandrydesigns.com) Scroll saw, wood working and painting patterns and surfaces. "Knowledge is Power"

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