LumberJocks

The chips were flying!

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by scottb posted 03-07-2007 05:50 AM 1412 reads 0 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Ran down into the basement for a little lathe time… wanted to practice a bit before I got to those screwdrivers. Incidentally, I hadn’t touched the lathe since I made the first one before Christmas.

Imagine my surprise to find my chisels good and sharp!

Having nothing in mind, I grabbed a piece of Maple root, approx 2” dia x 7” – probably the only piece that hasn’t split on me – and started seeing what would come of it.

This was a dream to turn, nice and tightly grained, dry as a bone, gotta get some more of this. Of course being irregularly shaped, I hadn’t yet stripped all the bark of before it seemed “done.” Another piece for the growing forest of odd turnings!

Next I started on making my mallet. Dick was kind enough to give me a photo of his, so I intended to make something similar. Found another piece of maple that looked and felt right. I got the handle portion nice and smooth with my skew, but only I managed to get only that far before my hands started to ache.

I remember I couldn’t even type after my first 3-hour turning class. (All the vibration and dig-ins I suppose, second class was much better, third, piece of cake) Need more practice, or to take another class to refresh.

Another rustic, if not barbaric tool.

One lesson learned tonight – I’m normally an advocate for using compact flourescent lighting, to save energy, but I can’t recommend having one by the lathe. The flickering light paired with trying to see a piece of wood spinning at a hundred thousand rpms (give or take) is distracting, and could be dangerous. I’d heard a story once about such a situation in a sawmill, where the flickering light made it look like the blades weren’t spinning!

-- I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it. - Van Gogh -- http://blanchardcreative.etsy.com -- http://snbcreative.wordpress.com/



13 comments so far

View dennis mitchell's profile

dennis mitchell

3994 posts in 3777 days


#1 posted 03-07-2007 06:32 AM

So I’ve heard.

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 3762 days


#2 posted 03-07-2007 06:56 AM

Your own homemade strobe light, pretty neat. Fluorescent lights aren’t good for carving either, they don’t give a shadow. A clear glass incandescent is the best light. I think even for turning. Maybe tomorrow you can show off your new mallet.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View oscorner's profile

oscorner

4564 posts in 3773 days


#3 posted 03-07-2007 09:08 AM

Interesting!

-- Jesus is Lord!

View schroeder's profile

schroeder

702 posts in 3588 days


#4 posted 03-07-2007 01:37 PM

Turning is something I’ve avoided up until now, only because I’ve heard it’s so addictive – do you find that to be the case Scott? (although it sure looks like it would be fun)

-- The Gnarly Wood Shoppe

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 3762 days


#5 posted 03-07-2007 02:11 PM

I hope you don’t mind Scott, but I have a suggestion. When you do a project with a piece of log, you should rough out the piece into a cylinder the full lengh. Then you can increase your RPM’s without any vibration, & it’s also safer. It’s less likely to shake loose, & fly off on you.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View Obi's profile

Obi

2213 posts in 3699 days


#6 posted 03-07-2007 04:04 PM

Best way to tell how addictive it is, is to see how long it takes him to get back to these replies.

View Bill's profile

Bill

2579 posts in 3624 days


#7 posted 03-07-2007 07:16 PM

It is definitely addictive Schroeder! I have a lathe and have not turned anything for awhile. However, the other day I was showing someone how it works and bingo, the urge hit. I have had to hold off the lathe for now while I finish some other projects. But, I can hear the call of it out there in the shop…

-- Bill, Turlock California, http://www.brookswoodworks.com

View Obi's profile

Obi

2213 posts in 3699 days


#8 posted 03-07-2007 09:26 PM

And he hasnt answered these replies and it’s been over 16 hours.

View scottb's profile

scottb

3648 posts in 3789 days


#9 posted 03-08-2007 02:53 AM

Schroeder – addictive, yes. I really like the instant gratification, and total concentration lathework requires. I took a pottery class almost 10 years back, and there is nothing so humbling as being pushed around by a 1 pound block of clay. I found I was able to achieve total concentration there – this was at one of those times in my life when I needed to distract my mind from the minutae of life, and that was just the ticket. Very zen.

Dick, thanks, but yes, I know that… I was actually making this on purpose. I’m playing around with a couple small “rustic projects”... which will ultimately be turned into something else. Just wanted to stop and document the process. This piece was about twice as long as my toolrest, so I decided to just clean up this part… I’m going to cut off that killer bump, then turn the rest down to the same diameter, before proceeding…. the “handle” is still WAY to big for anyone other than a giant (Andre, or the Jolly Green one, take your pick). Just about the time I had to move the tool rest in, was when it started getting late, right hand was starting to say uncle.

I should get a longer tool rest… but I”m trying to avoid getting to many accessories for the shopsmith, as I’d like to get a “real” lathe sooner or later.

-- I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it. - Van Gogh -- http://blanchardcreative.etsy.com -- http://snbcreative.wordpress.com/

View Obi's profile

Obi

2213 posts in 3699 days


#10 posted 03-08-2007 02:57 AM

I say make the handle fit your hand and then leave the rest the way it is. Call it a rustic Mallet for when you need a wooden mallet. Totally Barbaric.

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 3762 days


#11 posted 03-08-2007 03:01 AM

You don’need A long tool rest. I’ve gotten by for years with the one that came with the lathe. Just move it as you go. Have fun tonight with that big war club.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View scottb's profile

scottb

3648 posts in 3789 days


#12 posted 03-08-2007 04:32 AM

I was spoiled with a 12” when I took my class. Was an older model (they recently upgraded to all new Jet lathes) and super easy to adjust on the fly. I’m not happy with mine, but it’ll do for now. It’s hard to set parallel and level. One good, though occasionally frustrating thing about the Shopsmith, is the tight tolerances with the motor (a really heavy one) and the central tool support, is that they don’t always move easily on the rails. I’ve put all my weight behind them somedays, otherdays, no prob. But, For now it’ll do. I’m happy with what I can do with it, and I still think the machine was a good investment for all its versatility. As long as I have something to keep practicing on, I’m sure my wife won’t begrudge me a dedicated lathe (set at the proper height!) when we can swing it.

-- I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it. - Van Gogh -- http://blanchardcreative.etsy.com -- http://snbcreative.wordpress.com/

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 3762 days


#13 posted 03-08-2007 02:12 PM

You can’t get a deal like I did years ago. I bought my old craftsman for $20, with the chisels, but keep your eyes open you may find a deal someday. The problem I’ve found is when I’ve seen a good buy, & still can’t afford it, that’s a bummer.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com