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How not to #2: make a five board bench

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Blog entry by scottb posted 10-18-2007 01:33 AM 6154 reads 1 time favorited 2 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Turn a Bowl Part 2 of How not to series no next part

I thought I posted this as a project here, but it seems I just did a quickie at my old blog, just didn’t think it was so long ago…

Anyhow, I made this bench, almost entirely (save the faux breadboard ends) out of the closet shelf in my daughters room. (A girls gotta have two bars in the closet – or so I fear). Those two additional pieces were simply added there to get this bench to fit perfectly by the kitchen door, nestled in where the fridge used to be – the perfect place to put on/off your snow boots…. That is until a recent, and fairly severe rearranging of the furniture downstairs showed me how flawed this design really was (19 months later).

A “temporary” kitchen island was sent packing and we now have a table in the kitchen… (what a concept!) and this bench was called upon to serve as seating along one side of our drop leaf table (refinished by my grandfather – formerly the TV table, formerly the computer table, side table, et al. We had too many “kitchen tables, and finally banished the plastic laminated chip board wood looking one to the hinterlands)...

Unfortunatley, the bench is just an inch two long to fit between the legs, and I was going to cut those extra bits off the end… the problem is that it’s a pretty tight fit for two people to use the bench a the same time – smaller is no good.

At the same time, physics is working to a disadvantage, and where the sides overhang the legs, it turns out to be dangerously tippy if you’re not careful.

I consulted the other chairs in the house re: the proper height the bench should be, but I never looked into how far apart the legs should be, in relation to the ends… and despite a year and a half of use without incident (primarily due to the bench being enclosed on three sides by walls and cabinetry – no way for it to move, let alone tip) a new location highlights the flaws of this design – though it looks like its held up well for decades, if not a century. (cause it did, in another life)

Rather than lose any width, I think I’d best be served by drilling out the plugs, removing the screws, and relocating the legs a bit closer to the edges. I can cut new plugs to repair the holes. The killer bit is that I have a book with the plans for this type of bench – do you think I consulted it, of course not. I’ve read it several times… but not when throwing this project together.

Funny what difference a matter of a slight relocation can make…. had I never moved the bench (there will be a coat closet, or some such in that location eventually) I may never have known.

-- I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it. - Van Gogh -- http://blanchardcreative.etsy.com -- http://snbcreative.wordpress.com/



2 comments so far

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12642 posts in 3557 days


#1 posted 10-18-2007 02:02 AM

You live and learn. It looks nice.

BTW. I get lots of comments on my Plane T shirt…. I was wearing it yesterday.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View scottb's profile

scottb

3648 posts in 3787 days


#2 posted 10-18-2007 06:04 AM

Thanks,

Glad you like the shirt – and to hear that others do too… Too bad I’ve missed the Halloween boat on the next design.

-- I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it. - Van Gogh -- http://blanchardcreative.etsy.com -- http://snbcreative.wordpress.com/

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