LumberJocks

Thorsen Table contest #9: where there's a Lumberjock, there's a way...

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Blog entry by scottb posted 05-28-2007 03:46 PM 1910 reads 0 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 8: pile of small parts Part 9 of Thorsen Table contest series Part 10: Finis! »

I decided that I was going to finish the table yesterday. As I eluded to in my shop tour, the top is slate, specifically a piece of an old school chalkboard. (I have 4 or 5 large pieces courtesy of my grandfather).

Months ago I hung up a 2x3 (ish) piece in the kitchen with a couple screws, it drilled really easy and cleanly. I expected to be able to cut this with my jigsaw, but I meant to pick up (or look for) something else - just in case, when I was out getting a few things at the Big Blue Box. (You guessed it - I forgot)

On any setting (with a metal blade) I was unable to make more than a 1/4" dent in the slate. I scribed super easy with any metal tool, A few passes with a file brought up some dust, but was obvious this would take a while. I tried defining the line with a saw I don't use. The non cutting pull stroke did a much better job than the jig saw did, so I kept at it. It took a little (a lot) longer than cutting wood, but only because it was tiresome to handsaw through 46 inches of 1/4+ inch stone.

Yes, I was determined to finish last night. I have yet to replace my burnt out dremel. Couldn't find the battery to my older rotary tool. I couldn't find a file with a thin edge, but the saw seemed to work well enough - certainly got a nice straight line with it... and I only chipped one corner a bit.

A little epoxy to fix up that, and a little more sanding today (Talk about dusty!) and this baby is done! One side is smooth - the ROS sander cleaned off the bits of green paint, the other side has a nice "grain". despite a little flaking near the edges, I think this will be the show side.

Update 5/28:

I epoxied the chip back into place last night, then I went in this morning with some more epoxy mixed with some slate dust to fill in the gaps on the side.... and voila, a solid piece of slate! Sanded nearly invisibly on top, almost imperceptably on the side!

-- I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it. - Van Gogh -- http://blanchardcreative.etsy.com -- http://snbcreative.wordpress.com/



14 comments so far

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12642 posts in 3564 days


#1 posted 05-28-2007 03:52 PM

Cool. Cannot wait to see the finished table.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View mot's profile

mot

4911 posts in 3503 days


#2 posted 05-28-2007 03:56 PM

That’s going to be cool. I’m with Wayne…can’t wait to see the finished table.

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View David's profile

David

1970 posts in 3606 days


#3 posted 05-28-2007 04:35 PM

Scott -

I admire your approach and ingenuity! This is going to look awesome. Can’t wait for the finished product. I really like the sunburst grain pattern in the slate. Wonder what a small piece would look like buffed out and protected with microcrystalline wax?

-- http://foldingrule.blogspot.com

View Bob Babcock's profile

Bob Babcock

1804 posts in 3553 days


#4 posted 05-28-2007 05:42 PM

With that slate around you need to by yourself a couple of concrete blades for your skilsaw. Cuts through slate easily…..If I had remembered (I have a great memory, it’s just very short) that I had one myself I could have avoided destroying a bandsaw blade trying to resaw my ash burl…

-- Bob, Carver Massachusetts, Sawdust Maker http://www.capecodbaychallenge.org

View scottb's profile

scottb

3648 posts in 3794 days


#5 posted 05-28-2007 08:30 PM

I will certainly get a couple of those blades next time I’m out. I figured there was an easier way… I also decided (late on a sunday night after all the stores were closed) that I would be finishing that before I went to bed. Wanted at least one “free day” on this holiday weekend. If free means working in the garden, etc…

From what I’ve read about slate, it’s pretty impervious to spills and is more impervious than granite – hence it can be deemed anti-bacterial. Though it does scratch easily, I will be waxing the top – though even in kitchen use, it doesn’t need sealing. I can just picture plenty of coffee mug scratches if I do nothing.

-- I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it. - Van Gogh -- http://blanchardcreative.etsy.com -- http://snbcreative.wordpress.com/

View Karson's profile

Karson

35035 posts in 3867 days


#6 posted 05-28-2007 08:35 PM

Scott. Great Job. Sorry for the saw blades. You can also get a carbide grit blade for the jig saw. It does a great job on what you were trying to accomplish.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware soon moving to Virginia karsonwm@gmail.com †

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 3766 days


#7 posted 05-28-2007 08:36 PM

Great idea using the slate. It must have been a lot of work cutting with a hand saw. Does the saw have any teeth left? Good Luck Scott!!

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 3628 days


#8 posted 05-28-2007 08:40 PM

the top is going to be beautiful – and the history the table holds….

looking forward to seeing the end result!!

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View scottb's profile

scottb

3648 posts in 3794 days


#9 posted 05-28-2007 08:49 PM

Actually the saw looks a lot better than you’d think. I’ve just become so accustomed to my japanese saws, I didn’t mind sacrificing this one for the project. It may be the only time I’ve ever used it, though I’m sure it can be resharpened.

-- I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it. - Van Gogh -- http://blanchardcreative.etsy.com -- http://snbcreative.wordpress.com/

View scottb's profile

scottb

3648 posts in 3794 days


#10 posted 05-28-2007 08:50 PM

Plus with all the slate I have left (I also have a couple boxes of thinner shingles) I’ll have plenty of opportunities to use it (in any way other than painting on it, like I did for Christmas presents when I was in High School or College)

-- I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it. - Van Gogh -- http://blanchardcreative.etsy.com -- http://snbcreative.wordpress.com/

View Bill's profile

Bill

2579 posts in 3628 days


#11 posted 05-28-2007 10:28 PM

Nice job Scott. I am looking forward to seeing this table when it is complete. I nice touch with the slate top.

-- Bill, Turlock California, http://www.brookswoodworks.com

View dennis mitchell's profile

dennis mitchell

3994 posts in 3781 days


#12 posted 05-28-2007 11:10 PM

Strange world..you cut slate with a hand saw and I’m cutting MDF with a diamond blade.

View scottb's profile

scottb

3648 posts in 3794 days


#13 posted 05-28-2007 11:53 PM

LOL… Isn’t that always the way Dennis? :D

-- I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it. - Van Gogh -- http://blanchardcreative.etsy.com -- http://snbcreative.wordpress.com/

View scottb's profile

scottb

3648 posts in 3794 days


#14 posted 05-29-2007 12:06 AM

Just added two photos to show the repair job to the top. – you can see the chip from the 4th photo, put back where it belongs in the latter ones!

-- I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it. - Van Gogh -- http://blanchardcreative.etsy.com -- http://snbcreative.wordpress.com/

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