LumberJocks

Cove Jig for the Table Saw

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by scoobydooo9r posted 116 days ago 1153 reads 2 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I recently posted a picture frame project that I built for charity, and I included a photo of the cove jig that I used to create the profile on the frame. Since I got some questions about the jig, I decided to shoot a quick video that covers the jig in more detail. Honestly, Marc “The Wood Whisperer” Spagnuolo has an excellent video that covers the basics on these jigs, and it’s where I got the design from.

In my video, I just go through my jig and how I use it. I find that this is one jig that I really like using. I get great results from it every time. I also included some tips on how I would improve the design to make setup quite a bit easier. Hope you enjoy!

-- I don't make mistakes, I make design challenges!



6 comments so far

View jumbojack's profile

jumbojack

1149 posts in 1221 days


#1 posted 116 days ago

Hey Zac nice explanation. I have done a few cove sided boxes, but I just clamp a straight, jointed board on my saw top and like you just eyeball the blade to my work piece. I use two hand held hold downs and run them across the blade. Lots of dust. I never felt threatened.


Great job and nice jig.

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

View scoobydooo9r's profile

scoobydooo9r

135 posts in 2373 days


#2 posted 115 days ago

Thanks jumbojack (should I call you Jack?) Thanks for mentioning the single fence jig, I didn’t even think to bring it up in the video. I’m certain that it’s no different than using the parallelogram one, but mentally it just “feels” like I have less control. I had a kickback incident once, no injury just freaky, and ever since I am a control freak on the TS.

Some day I need to just get over it and give it a try, it’ll make setup much quicker! It usually just takes doing it once to make it a more comfortable process. I had the same issue with turning… it just felt like I was breaking a law of physics jamming a chisel into a spinning piece of wood. After finally getting the nerve to try it, my mental attitude changed.

-- I don't make mistakes, I make design challenges!

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

3342 posts in 2557 days


#3 posted 114 days ago

Too many “maybes”, and almosts. Tighten up the presentation a bit and you’ve got a good idea.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View scoobydooo9r's profile

scoobydooo9r

135 posts in 2373 days


#4 posted 114 days ago

I’m not exactly sure what you are talking about Bill, but in general I am working on improving my videos. This one was just a quickie that I wanted to get up since I got some questions about the jig from a project post. Thanks for the feedback.

-- I don't make mistakes, I make design challenges!

View jumbojack's profile

jumbojack

1149 posts in 1221 days


#5 posted 113 days ago

I don’t do much turning, like you it does not seem right. Then I see guys doing REALLY crazy stuff on a lathe and realize the little columns and handles I’m turning are nothing in comparison. I have been making razor stands and have been turning small things and am a little more comfortable.

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

View scoobydooo9r's profile

scoobydooo9r

135 posts in 2373 days


#6 posted 113 days ago

When I first started out with woodworking, I was always curious about trying it out. I fought the urge to get a mini lathe since I didn’t really have space for another tool, and the cost of buying all the accessories kept me at bay. Plus, I was still learning the basics of cutting square parts, and I was pretty certain that I would probably not be able to learn both at the same time (that was one decision that I am glad I made). Years later when I moved and set up shop in my Dad’s warehouse, and he happened to have a Shopsmith collecting dust in the corner I jumped in head first.

I took my Dad to an intro turning class for Father’s day a couple years ago, and I have loved every minute of it since. I still haven’t ventured into bowls, but I will get there soon. I still have some refining to do with my spindle turning skills.

I wouldn’t discount your work. The good thing about the internet is being able to see people doing amazing things… the problem with the internet is seeing people doing amazing things and thinking that you aren’t doing much. The truth is, there may be quite a few woodworkers/turners out there, but there are wayyy more people who couldn’t (or wouldn’t) be able to turn a simple knob. I saw your last project, and the shave stand spindle looks great! There is always more to learn though, heck it was only a couple days ago that I finally figured out the trick to consistently getting good results with CA glue finishes on my pens… I’ve been selling pens for over a year now, and just figured that out! We’re all in the same boat my friend :)

-- I don't make mistakes, I make design challenges!

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase