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Blacksmiths Anvil, a woodworking project.

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Blog entry by saddletramp posted 1076 days ago 2062 reads 1 time favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch

An anvil as a woodworking project, how could that be? Well, I started by building a jig for the router to flaten and level both ends of a cherry stump.

Then I heated and bent some rod to make staples to hold the anvil down.

Routed out an inset for the anvil to set into.

Drilled pilot holes for the staples

and drove them in.

And in the end, the router jig morphed into a box for my scrap iron.

-- ♫♪♪♫♫ Saddletramp, saddletramp, I'm as free as the breeze and I ride where I please, saddletramp ♪♪♪♫♪ ...... Bob W....NW Michigan (Traverse City area)



12 comments so far

View Don W's profile (online now)

Don W

14610 posts in 1164 days


#1 posted 1076 days ago

Now that’s a wood working project!! I’m watching those anvil at the flee markets. So far they are out of my price range. Right now its a piece of railroad track for me.

That’s a pretty cool stand.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View Brit's profile

Brit

5107 posts in 1440 days


#2 posted 1076 days ago

That’s wonderful. Wish I had one like that! Actually, I just wish I had one. LOL.

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it.

View ksSlim's profile

ksSlim

955 posts in 1487 days


#3 posted 1076 days ago

My first thought, what a shame to use a big piece of cherry for an anvil stand. Then I saw the anvil, that bad boy is in great shape! Nice job. What are your plans for the leg vise? Free standing or benchmount?

-- Sawdust and shavings are therapeutic

View racerglen's profile

racerglen

2254 posts in 1377 days


#4 posted 1076 days ago

Very nice ! At first I wasn’t sure what you were going to staple when I saw the size of rod getting bent, then I got the scale of size of anvil. Now that’s a serious piece of smith tool ! I’ve got a smaller one, parialy hollow inside to alow for the vice screw ..It was orriginaly made that way, the jaws are similar to those on the leg vice mounted at the other end from the anvil’s horn.

Like yours it’s atop a wood stump, but higher, that alows for my leg vice to be off the other side.

-- Glen, Vernon B.C. Canada

View helluvawreck's profile (online now)

helluvawreck

15395 posts in 1463 days


#5 posted 1075 days ago

Bob, that’s a real nice looking anvil and you did a good job of mounting it.

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View moment's profile

moment

2100 posts in 1278 days


#6 posted 1075 days ago

Thanks for showing that, saddle. The patina on the anvil and hammer is great . It reminds me of me ;
showing it’s age but still kicking . Have fun pounding on that ! Good job .

View mafe's profile

mafe

9435 posts in 1686 days


#7 posted 1075 days ago

Wauu, yes that is something we all should have!
Nice idea to flatten, and wonderful that the jig became a box after for the iron parts.
So you are the one to ask for smith projects…
Looking good!
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View saddletramp's profile

saddletramp

994 posts in 1235 days


#8 posted 1075 days ago

Don, Andy and Wreck, thanks for the nice comments.

Slim and Glen, I’m going to build a small bench for the leg vise but I haven’t decided yet on how I’m going to attach the bottom of the vise to the floor. I’m afraid that if I just drill a hole in the concrete for it that it will start acting like a jack hammer when I start beating on it. If anyone has any ideas on how to spread out the impact point so that I won’t be tearing up my floor, bring them on.

Moment, aren’t we all!! LOL

Mads, at this point I am only the one to ask if your smithing project is merely to discombobulate some metal. LOL I do have a forge and after I get back from this road trip to Montana I will be firing it up for the first time and trying it all out (mostly just beating steel into unrecognizable shapes I’m afraid).

-- ♫♪♪♫♫ Saddletramp, saddletramp, I'm as free as the breeze and I ride where I please, saddletramp ♪♪♪♫♪ ...... Bob W....NW Michigan (Traverse City area)

View racerglen's profile

racerglen

2254 posts in 1377 days


#9 posted 1074 days ago

A small chunk of plate metal, steel or iron under the leg would help, or even plywood ? I’d think solid wood would split in short order. A rubber crutch tip might also work, but it might have a short life as well.
Mine just sits right on the cement, but then I’m not smithing with it, it’s just the biggest vice in my shop.
(after the woodworking of course..)

-- Glen, Vernon B.C. Canada

View ksSlim's profile

ksSlim

955 posts in 1487 days


#10 posted 1074 days ago

I welded a 6” dia. pipe to a 17” inverted truck rim, 1/2 plate welded to pipe at a proper height to make sure that when the rim was filled with concrete, the leg end or knob would embeded in the concrete. Its movable in a small shop. It can stand near the anvil, forge, bench or in a corner where ever is more useful.

-- Sawdust and shavings are therapeutic

View mafe's profile

mafe

9435 posts in 1686 days


#11 posted 1074 days ago

Looking forward to hear details.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View SamuelP's profile

SamuelP

735 posts in 1243 days


#12 posted 852 days ago

Fantastic anvil.

-- -Sam - Tampa, FL- "A man who carries a cat by the tail learns somthing he can in no other way" -Mark Twain

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