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Norms Router Cabinet #4: Bit Tray's and Cabinet Door are Done - well almost

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Blog entry by sIKE posted 10-03-2008 03:27 AM 2174 reads 0 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 3: The Electrical Work Part 4 of Norms Router Cabinet series Part 5: Drawers and Trays are done »

Worked on this last weekend and got back on it today. When I worked on it Sunday getting the door in place I quickly realized that a previous mistake, the left inside panel for the tray cabinet was key stoned with the top tilting in. This left a major gap on the right hand side of the door. The case was glued and brad nailed so I was very afraid to take it back apart to fix it in the first place. So I thought about it all week while in Nebraska and came up with how to fix it.

It worked out just great, basically the solution was to use my heat gun to soften the glue, then my cabinet makers mallet to knock the cleat loose, and I then pulled the old brads out. Next was a clamp used to spread the partition a part and I then placed a spacer the appropriate size in the tray space and then used a big parallel clamp to pull everything back to its proper place. New brads and glue to fix everything in their proper location. I am very pleased with the results. One side effect is that I am going to have to re-do all of the bit tray fronts and build out two new trays.

So here is where things stand as of this evening.

Router Cabinet 1

And here are some of the trays pulled out.

Router Cabinet 2

Next up is to fix the two trays all of the fronts on the left hand side and to get the drawers done.

-- //FC - Round Rock, TX - "Experience is what you get just after you need it"



9 comments so far

View Scott Bryan's profile

Scott Bryan

27251 posts in 2568 days


#1 posted 10-03-2008 04:16 AM

This is going to be a nice addition to your shop. Nice recovery on the drawer too. To be honest with you I probably would not have thought to try and break the glue and nail joint. But you obviously were “thinking outside the box” and came up with a nice solution to your problem.

Well done.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

View sIKE's profile

sIKE

1271 posts in 2500 days


#2 posted 10-03-2008 04:49 AM

Scott,

I was reading through blogs at some point and saw that someone used a blow dryer to remove a template that was adhered using spray glue. So a LJ was the source of the inspiration of course…. :)

-- //FC - Round Rock, TX - "Experience is what you get just after you need it"

View HokieMojo's profile

HokieMojo

2103 posts in 2474 days


#3 posted 10-03-2008 05:30 AM

looks good. Also looks like you’ve been stocking up on some of those woodcraft bits. I can’t believe how quickly you are getting everything put together. Hope you can maintain the pace!

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6698 posts in 2725 days


#4 posted 10-03-2008 05:48 AM

I have a question, how you going to turn this off?

That switch is huge. Even a blind woodworker could find it!

Very nice work.

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View sIKE's profile

sIKE

1271 posts in 2500 days


#5 posted 10-03-2008 04:03 PM

HokieMojo,

I can’t pass up a good quality $5 bit. Just a sucker that way and I have room for a lot more. :)

-- //FC - Round Rock, TX - "Experience is what you get just after you need it"

View sIKE's profile

sIKE

1271 posts in 2500 days


#6 posted 10-03-2008 04:06 PM

Lee,

Thanks! This has been one of those learning projects again. Sort wished I flipped the location of the wrench drawer and the electrics. That way that switch would be on my left. But alas it is not to be :)

If you are having vision problems and are in need, you can get your very own “huge” switch at Grizzly. :)

-- //FC - Round Rock, TX - "Experience is what you get just after you need it"

View Southern_Woodworker's profile

Southern_Woodworker

6 posts in 2267 days


#7 posted 10-04-2008 01:48 PM

I built this router table a few years ago and it has really been a good table. However I will give you one piece of advice. If you live in a humid environment you will want to stay away from using MDF to make the fence. It’s ok for the top but I have had issues with the sliding fence. On my table the out feed side had swollen causing a slight lip that would cause the work piece to hang and ultimately left a small snipe in my work piece every time I would try to negotiate around it. I eventually replaced the sliding components with UHMW which made a huge difference. I think I will rebuild the top though and get a little better router plate and use phenolic plywood for the top. In all the table has been a great addition to the shop and the dust extraction has been superb. You will really enjoy it.

View sIKE's profile

sIKE

1271 posts in 2500 days


#8 posted 10-04-2008 02:31 PM

Wow, what great ideas! Karson has recently blogged about using phenolic plywood, and I hadn’t even considered using it in this application.

Did you use full pieces of UHMW or did you use the tape?

Thanks!

-- //FC - Round Rock, TX - "Experience is what you get just after you need it"

View Southern_Woodworker's profile

Southern_Woodworker

6 posts in 2267 days


#9 posted 10-04-2008 09:43 PM

I used full 3/4” pieces for both the infeed and outfeed slides. When I rebuild the top I plan to use the phenolic plywood for all the other parts except the feather board strip above the fence. That’s just so the thickness is the same as the fence.

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