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Stanley #4 Type 9 or 10 - Plane Restoration #1: The cleanup

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Blog entry by sIKE posted 02-26-2008 05:54 PM 938 reads 0 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of Stanley #4 Type 9 or 10 - Plane Restoration series no next part

I have learned that projects in progress go in the blog and the completed project goes in project. The first part of this series I started as a project and I am now moving it here untill the project is compelete.

Here are the metal pieces after cleanup. I used Evapo Rust to clean these pieces, though I had started on the body with wire wheel and wire brushes. The rest ended up even worse, I had put them into a plastic bin and add some solvents to keep them from rusting any more utill I could get back to them. The problem was the solvents were giving me a headache and after a week or so I moved the bin outside and put a cover over it and promptly forgot about out it. Came back last week and all of the parts but the plane body were imersed in a nasty water/rust/solvent mix, the pieces were imersered for two days in the evapo rust and this is how they look.

Cleaned Up

for reference see the 2nd pic in this project then look at this one

Detail

-- //FC - Round Rock, TX - "Experience is what you get just after you need it"



7 comments so far

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 3449 days


#1 posted 02-26-2008 06:09 PM

Looks naked!

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View Thos. Angle's profile

Thos. Angle

4445 posts in 3423 days


#2 posted 02-26-2008 08:14 PM

Gaining on it.

-- Thos. Angle, Jordan Valley, Oregon

View Scott Bryan's profile

Scott Bryan

27251 posts in 3282 days


#3 posted 02-26-2008 08:41 PM

It looks as if your restoration job is going well. I just did the same thing with a #5 and #8. Evapo-rust works well. Both of my planes were missing the cap iron screws and I ended up replacing the irons and chip breakers with ones from Hock. They both perform beautifully. Now if only the operator was as finely tuned as the planes.

The completed restoration should be interesting.

Thanks for the post.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

View HokieMojo's profile

HokieMojo

2103 posts in 3189 days


#4 posted 09-22-2008 08:07 PM

I looked this up because I remembered someone had posted about evapo rust. I’m going to have some plane restoration work to do soon and plan to try this out based on your suggestion. Thanks! Any more progress made restoring thus guy? I know you are busy working on the shop, but just curious.

View sIKE's profile

sIKE

1271 posts in 3214 days


#5 posted 09-22-2008 10:15 PM

Its still on the to-do list. Be careful as it will soften the Japanning after an extended soak….

-- //FC - Round Rock, TX - "Experience is what you get just after you need it"

View HokieMojo's profile

HokieMojo

2103 posts in 3189 days


#6 posted 09-22-2008 11:29 PM

Thanks. I’m not sure if the japaning is of concern for what I’m getting (from the photos, there might not be more than 10% left already). Good luck

View sIKE's profile

sIKE

1271 posts in 3214 days


#7 posted 09-23-2008 02:43 AM

Well that might be a good thing then. I found that a 3” round wire wheel on my cordless drill did a great job of getting the crevices cleaned up.

-- //FC - Round Rock, TX - "Experience is what you get just after you need it"

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