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Working with recycled timber #61: 2100 x 150 x150 Challenge

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Blog entry by robscastle posted 08-31-2016 06:40 AM 1051 reads 0 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 60: Ben Clark Memorial Part 61 of Working with recycled timber series Part 62: Organic Bar Stool from Pine »

I was fortunate enough to obtain a heap of timber beams from under the house of my friend Wally.

It was also fortunate I had No1 and No3 son staying for the weekend and they assisted in loading and unloading the material.

There were ten beams overall, The 2 x grey chamfered ones being Oregon, and the remaining seven being a pine species, either Hoop Pine or Huon Pine, both species getting into the hard to find category and the Huon pine is a timber no longer allowed to be cut down and a licence to mill it is held by only 3 sawmills which leads to the pine being recovered from waterways for the next two generations possibly making it very expensive to buy these days.

Here is the stack the boys did.

Some dimensions checked:

One of the beams is yet to be accurately identified its the runt in the stack.

Now for the Challenge

No1 son (who I made the 1500×1500mm table top for) wants a rustic narrow long hall table and was keen to use the timber we had just received.

So today I set to work cutting one up, I chose the 2100 length because it was the lightest and only just managable by me on my own.

I wrestled it onto the table saw and set up some in and out feed rollers to assist me.

I determined I could cut three pieces at 48mm to maximise the timber,

I checked the beam and it had a bow in it on one side, but the remaining sides were surprisingly straight and square, So I worked out I could do two cuts in from each side then invert and repeat without having to joint it first, you would not get away with missing this step with the timber sold these days!

So it was a slow careful feed.

Ripping :

The first two cuts:

All went well so I continued on and did two more. The bow is visible in the middle if you look closely!

Edge trueing:

I attached my straight edge onto the side of the beam using double sided tape, all the tape did really was to stop it from sliding around, and again I worked it through the saw.

Thicknessing:

I didnt take any in progress shots of the thicknessing, but hey, thicknessing is thicknessing, the results are the important aspect so here they are.

For what it is, just pine is its beautiful timber so its “Challenge Completed”.

Now I will just have to wait for assistance with the rest.

The Table Saw:

Did the saw like it? well a bit of belt screeching occured at one time of which was possibly my fault I think, as a slight check on the alignment stopped it imediately and all was well again.

Mind you a sharp blade is essential!

I dont think it would be the same story if I was silly enough to do a full depth cut like this with a similar hardwood variety. I could however possibly do incremental cuts if it was really required.

Closure:

Similar timber like this (Doulas Fir/Oregon) sells for about $35 to $45 per Lm

-- Regards Robert



8 comments so far

View Mark Wilson's profile

Mark Wilson

1738 posts in 524 days


#1 posted 08-31-2016 08:45 AM

Rob, by “Oregon,” what, prithee, dost thou mean? Is it Oregon Pine?
Also, did you get a huge pitch build-up on your saw table?

-- Mark

View Mark Wilson's profile

Mark Wilson

1738 posts in 524 days


#2 posted 08-31-2016 08:46 AM

I always forget to click the “wathlist” thing.

-- Mark

View crowie's profile

crowie

1479 posts in 1411 days


#3 posted 08-31-2016 10:53 AM

Very nice score Rob….

-- Lifes good, Enjoy each new day...... Cheers from "On Top DownUnder" Crowie

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

3390 posts in 1665 days


#4 posted 08-31-2016 10:55 AM

The timbers and characteristics

First up Oregon or Douglas Fir is a timber which originated in North America and is now grown in plantations in New Zealand and to a limited extent in Australia.

The Oregon you buy these days is no where a nice close grain timber that it used to be, its not weather or bug resistant so is used in building framing above the ground or in metal stirups if outside.

The beams, in particular the one I milled up is possibly Hoop pine mainly for the reason it had no odour when being sawn up.
Unlike its relative slash pine which you almost need a water jet on the blade when milling it because of the resin, there is no resin residue buildup when milling it . Hoop pine is very soft and like Oregon not an outdoor timber due to its charactistics as well. Great for building wooden boats though which is odd !

The botanical or Scientific names are
Hoop pine: Araucaria cunninghamii
Oregon: Pseudotsuga menziesii or Pseudotsuga taxifolia, which is meaningless to me as to whether they are related or not,... they dont sound similar thats for sure!

-- Regards Robert

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7479 posts in 1468 days


#5 posted 08-31-2016 12:33 PM

So if you and your boys took these timbers from under Wally’s house….
WHAT’S holding up Wally’s house NOW???
.

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View TZH's profile

TZH

526 posts in 2601 days


#6 posted 08-31-2016 01:40 PM

All I can say is you’re a HELL of a lot better at thicknessing using a tablesaw than I am.

Incredible find! Incredible workmanship!

TZH

-- Where The Spirit In Wood Lives On

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

9432 posts in 3513 days


#7 posted 08-31-2016 07:29 PM

Very nice way you cleaned it all up…

I have a few old pieces out in the back yard that I could apply this to… someday…

BTW, Oregon is just one State away from California… Beautiful country up there…
Pine & Douglas Fir, I think are the main types grown up there… of course Redwood a little lower into Calif.

Thank you…

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View Mark Wilson's profile

Mark Wilson

1738 posts in 524 days


#8 posted 08-31-2016 08:17 PM



The timbers and characteristics

First up Oregon or Douglas Fir is a timber which originated in North America and is now grown in plantations in New Zealand and to a limited extent in Australia.

The Oregon you buy these days is no where a nice close grain timber that it used to be, its not weather or bug resistant so is used in building framing above the ground or in metal stirups if outside.

The beams, in particular the one I milled up is possibly Hoop pine mainly for the reason it had no odour when being sawn up.
Unlike its relative slash pine which you almost need a water jet on the blade when milling it because of the resin, there is no resin residue buildup when milling it . Hoop pine is very soft and like Oregon not an outdoor timber due to its charactistics as well. Great for building wooden boats though which is odd !

The botanical or Scientific names are
Hoop pine: Araucaria cunninghamii
Oregon: Pseudotsuga menziesii or Pseudotsuga taxifolia, which is meaningless to me as to whether they are related or not,... they dont sound similar thats for sure!

- robscastle

So, it’s Doug Fir.

-- Mark

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