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Box making Curved Front Box #11: Front Alternative method

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Blog entry by robscastle posted 149 days ago 731 reads 0 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 10: The second veneer run and trim work commences Part 11 of Box making Curved Front Box series Part 12: The Trim work Commences »

Well now here is some good news, I thought so anyway !
Background.
Kiefer posted a banana stand he made for is daughter, a great job too! and to add to the skills a blog was added as to how he made the curve shape, take a look because there is information there I used but did not repeat here.

So what’s all the excitement? well I read the blog then the project this morning and realised I had gone to a lot of effort and time to make the curved front I used.

So appreciating the concept I cast all the other work aside for a while and I set up a sled and used a piece of scrap wood to prove if the concept would work for me.

Or simply put “I have gotta try that straight away”!!

The Sled is fairly basic just some MDF and a miter gauge mounted in reverse on the table saw.

Well not including the set up time and not having any accurate marking out ( I had to resaw every second cut!) I had a workable solution within about 30 minutes.

Here is the method I would seriously consider if I ever made a curved front box again.

This is the test piece being cut, and due to being a prototype it was re cut. (hence the block under the end)

I used similar index marks as those by Kiefer, although mine were originally too wide for my application, as I was not able to do the inclined reverse cuts due to my design.

I used the same 10 degrees as Kiefer.

From the time it come off the saw it looked like a very promising test, (although Rough as) so into the existing Jig/Caul it went.

Now when you look at this take into consideration it was only a concept test not an actual working piece.

So ignoring the jig/Caul will need modification or redesign to fully suit, the accuracy of the cuts will have to be refined and the use of specific jointed and dressed timber used along with two pieces of finishing veneer it would work and with less process and effort from that of my original labour intensive activity.

Amazing what you can learn from other LJs !! I am impressed and most appreciative of Kiefer unintentional mentoring and guidance.

Thank you.

-- Regards Robert



13 comments so far

View kiefer's profile

kiefer

2785 posts in 1167 days


#1 posted 149 days ago

Robert
For you application I would make straight cuts and use a indexing deice to get even spacing .
Wetting the thin part of the board will also help it from breaking in the jig .
These reason I used angled cuts is for decoration only .

-- Kiefer 松

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

1234 posts in 705 days


#2 posted 149 days ago

Kiefer

Thanks for the info,
Firstly I went back into the blog and edited Keifer to Kiefer sorry about that!

OK got it 90 deg will be remembered, I was unsure as to why you chose 10 deg alt as i had never seen it before and so I rechecked the pictures to try and find an answer, but could not see any reason why, so I used it knowing it would work!

Now I know and yes it is very effective.

Thanks again !!

松开,

-- Regards Robert

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

1234 posts in 705 days


#3 posted 149 days ago

Up date:

I could have just hucked the material in the bin, but there was no new learning in that, so

I decided to continue on just for the experience,

Cut some veneer strips for the sides

Hit everything with Titebond II,

prepared the caul and clamped everything up

Had to add some extra clamps on the ends due to the small size of the caul

And its quietly drying, I should really do some CFB work but I am having too much fun “fooling about” and learning stuff.

Enjoy

-- Regards Robert

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

4657 posts in 1298 days


#4 posted 148 days ago

Any day you learn something new is a very good day.
Congrats on having a fine day.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View stefang's profile

stefang

11820 posts in 1835 days


#5 posted 148 days ago

Easy to relate to your joy in having learned a new and useful technique Robert. I think that might be my favorite part of woodworking. I know that doesn’t make sense, but then much of life doesn’t. I have a woodworking book I bought back in 1972 that shows this bending technique. Surprisingly (or maybe not) there are ‘rules’ for doing this kind of work. This being an out of print publication, I will scan that information and send it to you somehow. I’m not sure how well that will work out, but it’s worth a try.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

1234 posts in 705 days


#6 posted 148 days ago

Mike and Paul

Its really stressful being retired I get up have a cup of Coffee turn the PC on and read stuff on LJs then if its something that attracts me I just go do it,

Minimal knowledge,experience but the will to achieve a result.

With more knowledge I guess I can do procedures better, but that’s the enjoyment and it keeps me occupied for longer than normal I can assure you.

It will be good to venture into wood bending and HHG processes and get a kick out of it at the same time

Today because it was so hot I skulked off up the road to my friend Wally’s house… he is about 90+ and has a fully packed area under his house its a maze of gear timber mouldings and just about any thing you could think of, none of which he uses any more but he can tell you every characteristic about them.

I bought a huge QR vice from him that he pulled out from somewhere for $50.00, after two beers it was not the sort of luggage I needed to carry home on my shoulder I tell you.
All I need to do now is work out how to fix it to the bench!!

-- Regards Robert

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

1234 posts in 705 days


#7 posted 148 days ago

Here is the completed product, I don’t advocate its load bearing capabilities or structural integrity but its finished.

Amazing what lurks below the surface !!

-- Regards Robert

View stefang's profile

stefang

11820 posts in 1835 days


#8 posted 148 days ago

That came out quite nice Robert. I would think it is pretty strong with the veneer on it. Kind of like a curved torsion box. Probably more than strong enough for a draw front. Maybe some destructive testing to find out just how strong.

I have also seen curved drawers made from solid wooden blocks glued together like a bricks and then cut and sanded smooth before veneering. I think that is the way they did it in the old days and it was a great way to get some use out of all those short cutoffs that every shop has more than enough of.

It seems there are so many ways to do the same thing based on the materials and tools one has on hand.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

4657 posts in 1298 days


#9 posted 148 days ago

Hey Rob, your morning sounds eerily like mine.
The reason I mentioned a liner veneer before was that I renovated a lovely old sideboard for my wife a couple of years ago which had curved drawers made just like your original front and while the veneer and matching was beautiful, you could see the layers telegraphing through.
.........so yes it has been done that way for along time. So of course has kerfing.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View stefang's profile

stefang

11820 posts in 1835 days


#10 posted 148 days ago

This wasn’t quite as easy as I thought it would be. The accompanying instructions are written in Norwegian, so I will write a translation for each step. I hope you find it useful. Please let me know if there is anything you don’t understand.

1. Rip an edge off the solid wood you intend to bend (or equivalent) Mark a line (A) 2” in from from the end.

2. Mark off the length of the radius from point (A) to point (B)

3. Make a saw cut through 3/4 of the width at point (A), then clamp the piece down at the end near point (A) to a flat surface, then make a mark on the surface at point (B).

4. Push at point (B) along the surface until the sawkerf at point (A) closes up, then make another mark at point (B). The difference between the first and second marks at point (B) will determine the correct spacing for the cuts on you actual workpiece.

5. Make a series of cuts on the actual workpiece with the spacing determined in step 4. These cuts should be 3/4 through the thickness of the workpiece.

6. Place glue in the sawkerfs then bend the radius with a cord and clamp the workpiece to a flat surface until dry. Sand and veneer.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

4657 posts in 1298 days


#11 posted 148 days ago

Excellent information Mike. I’ve been doing this for years by eyeball and never even thought about a “correct” formula. This would give you a curve with the kerfs actually glued at the ends. I will remember this one.

Thanks for the translation.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View mafe's profile

mafe

9231 posts in 1590 days


#12 posted 148 days ago

Really fine, yes magic under the surface.
Mike that’s cool.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

1234 posts in 705 days


#13 posted 148 days ago

Oh Yeah I am excited ! how simple is that ! great work Mike I will report back soon, I think I have to go shopping with Aurora. PPsst boring… no wood working shops in the complex!!

-- Regards Robert

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