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Making Mouldings #4: Making biggerer dowels on the shaper

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Blog entry by robscastle posted 377 days ago 747 reads 0 times favorited 4 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 3: Making dowel and half dowel on the Router/Shaper Part 4 of Making Mouldings series Part 5: Rebating Round Stock on the Shaper »

Well I was so pleased with the previous dowel making activities and it was such a nice day I decided to continue and progress to some Big stock using my 3/4” round over bit.

Background:
Nothing much different to report on here than before, apart from the fact I need to mention that the blogs I read all seemed to use incremental cuts to produce the final result rather than just one run.

Materials: From my stock I found some Oregon a suitable size for experimenting on
That’s it with the pink primer on it in the center of the stockpile.

The Tools

All the same tools as before were used, plus this time I rolled out the jointer.

I ripped the stock into three suitable pieces at 40mm.

Next I used the jointer to reduce both sides to 38.5mm x 38.5mm.

I then set up the router bit and

adjusted the fence ready to go

Using the same process as my previous blog I set to work.

I worked the timber through and stopped at the other end.


Then it was a matter of repeating the process on each side.

Once I had all sides done I was confident enough to hold the stock against the out feed fence and draw it through to see what sort of a result I would get.
The finish was OK so I repeated it on each end, this made the dowel length more useable and I didn’t need to cut off the ends later.

I then repeated the process on the other two lengths.

This is what I ended up with.

Conclusion:

The same process again worked well for the larger stock, as it was Oregon I was able to radius each side in one pass, something possibly not achievable with a harder timber.

The overall result appeared to be better after Jointing the material, Meaning very little sanding this time.

Well that’s my curiosity satisfied, so it will be no more from me on the dowel subject

Enjoy

-- Regards Robert



4 comments so far

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

10533 posts in 1286 days


#1 posted 376 days ago

Add a feather board above your stock (on the fence) to prevent stock from climbing. I assume “Oregon” is Douglas Fir?

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View robscastle's profile (online now)

robscastle

1485 posts in 800 days


#2 posted 376 days ago

Thanks gfadvm,
Yes the featherboard should be used instead of being in the Acc Box, good pickup.

Oregon yep AKA Douglas Fir, don’t know the reason why possibly some anti American thinking in reverse here down under, who knows !!

-- Regards Robert

View robscastle's profile (online now)

robscastle

1485 posts in 800 days


#3 posted 376 days ago

I have researched the name and submit the following information

Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), perhaps the most common tree in Oregon, is the most important conifer in the state because of its ecological and economic significance. The Oregon legislature recognized this when it designated Douglas-fir the official state tree in 1936. Eight of ten conifers west of the Cascades are Douglas-firs.
The widely accepted common name—Douglas-fir—commemorates David Douglas, the Scottish botanist who identified plants in Oregon in the nineteenth century. Other common names are Oregon pine (lumbermen), red-fir (used by loggers to distinguish it from the true fir of California, Abies magnifica), Douglasfir, Douglastree, and common douglas. The generic name Pseudotsuga means false (Pseudo) hemlock (tsuga, the Japanese name for hemlock).
For a time, the tree was known as Pseudotsuga taxifolia. The current accepted scientific name, Pseudotsuga menziesii, honors Archibald Menzies, a Scottish surgeon and naturalist who, on the George Vancouver expedition, was the first European to report the presence of this species on Vancouver Island in 1793.

-- Regards Robert

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

10533 posts in 1286 days


#4 posted 375 days ago

Thanks for all that research/information.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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