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Jig Blog #4: Building a Beaded face frame Jig without spending heaps of loot. Pt1.

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Blog entry by robscastle posted 01-11-2019 10:47 AM 924 reads 0 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 3: Another Shaper Dough Nut or is it Donut? Part 4 of Jig Blog series no next part

OK I spent $81 AUD on,

1×1/4 Beading bit P/N 42500 $32 AUD and
1×1/4 1.5 ” Notching bit P/N 4200 $49 AUD.

Now some explanation of the actual bits, if you are not familiar with these bits dont bother trying to understand the packaging markings or try to measure them it will only confuse you more.
They do not follow conventional Router bit identification markings.

So here we go:-
For one they are not 1/4 shanks both are 1/2”
The 1/4” on the notching bit actually refers to the depth of cut needed in the timber and I can assure you its much larger than 1 1/2 ” in diameter.
The 1/4 on the beading bit refers to the radius of the bead it produces.

Both bits require set up gauges to set them to exactly at a 1/4 ” to produce acceptable results.

Now for the jig.

I made a jig from a series of reused materials I had lying about:-
Plywood for the base (riddled with holes), some pine for the fence and a section of Tee track and two Tee track bolts and knobs add 4 screws and its all together.
The Jig is designed to be used with a shaper.

A view from the front

now another front side

A view from the rear.

the fence is high to support wide timber securely. The notches or cut out at the top are to allow for F clamps to be used on smaller width material.

To remove any slop in the tee track I drilled the tee bolt holes half a mm bigger so I could lock the jig on the table with minimal play.

In case you had not noticed the jig when fitted to the Tee track in the shaper it is effectively using the shaper sideways,
The operator stands at the side closest to where the power switch is located to avoid leaning over the work to operate it.

I needed to mark the positions of the profile of the notching bit and extend the lines up above work pieces, this is done to assist in initial alignment of the timber when doing the first cuts, upon finishing the first notch and before removing the clamp a stop block is fitted, now no further marking out is now required for this step simply use the stop block.

I would recommend using test blocks to assist in the complete process of setting up accurately.

Height of the notching bit.

The notching bit needs to be set at exactly 1/4 high so the amount of timber removed is concise and will later match the bead profile.

To cut the bevels set the timber against the marks fit the stop block and carefully bevel away, upon being in the correct position flip the timber over(if required) and cut the second bevel.

Do a test fit up and your good to go continue with with all the bevels.

This will become clearer in Pt2.

More to follow its beer O’Clock

-- Regards Rob



7 comments so far

View pottz's profile (online now)

pottz

3847 posts in 1225 days


#1 posted 01-11-2019 02:08 PM

im stayin out of this one,but duckie is gonna love it.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View Jay Boutwell's profile

Jay Boutwell

47 posts in 1476 days


#2 posted 01-11-2019 05:58 PM

Looks good Rob. I know that you have seen my beaded face frames on some of the work I have done. I do my beads using a different system, I do the notching on a table saw using a sled and a large dedicated notching wheel that mounts on the saw arbor. The beads are cut on a simple router table.

System is quick and fast. It if the system form Sommerfeld tools and the full cost is under $230.00 which includes an 48 inch long extrusion for a fence, the notching cutter that had 6 carbide notch cutters, and a 3/16” and a 1/4” beading bits. Bit shanks are 1/2 inch dia and the notching wheel is a 5/8 dia bore for standard saw arbors. The system works well on both 1 1/2” and 1 5/8” wide 3/4 and 13/16 thick lumber . Also includes a DVD on how it is used. Can be seen on you tube . https://youtu.be/ODPmm4nU8lc

-- Jay-- Cabinet Technology

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

5633 posts in 2445 days


#3 posted 01-11-2019 07:36 PM

Pottzy: What! dont you do beaded face frames ? boo hiss, I actually thought about asking if I could borrow yours but thought better of it and decided to get my own tools!

Jay: Thanks for the link, Marc’s system is not locally available in Australia, another GRRRipper situation, costs a bomb for freight.

-- Regards Rob

View pottz's profile (online now)

pottz

3847 posts in 1225 days


#4 posted 01-11-2019 09:05 PM



Pottzy: What! dont you do beaded face frames ? boo hiss, I actually thought about asking if I could borrow yours but thought better of it and decided to get my own tools!

Jay: Thanks for the link, Marc s system is not locally available in Australia, another GRRRipper situation, costs a bomb for freight.

- robscastle


i dont know just never had that kind of project yet,plus thats a lot of money for something id use maybe once.now if i had those aussie big bucks what could stop me-lol.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View anthm27's profile (online now)

anthm27

547 posts in 1350 days


#5 posted 01-11-2019 11:13 PM

Nice one Rob,
I was wondering how much the two router bits would cost in the US?
Also I was going to say, let me know if you want me to pick you up the sommerfield system in the US, But, it seems you have it sorted.
Nice looking router table machine.
Regards
Anth

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

5633 posts in 2445 days


#6 posted 01-12-2019 12:06 AM

Anthony,

I would certainly be interested in at least finding out the cost, from what Jay Boutwell said it was about $230 USD.

I will hit my BFF Pottzy up for the cash!

-- Regards Rob

View Jay Boutwell's profile

Jay Boutwell

47 posts in 1476 days


#7 posted 01-12-2019 12:47 AM

Ref beaded face frame: Hey guys Marc Sommerfeld sells the beading bits separately—3/16 bead bit for $ 22.90 and the 1/4 bit for $23.90. You can made the system work without the extruded 4 foot piece by just making a solid wood fence. When it first came out on the market the extruded aluminum was not yet available and it came along as a up grade piece a few months after the system was introduced. Without that you could knock off another fifty bucks so that would make the system with the two bits at $180.00 here in the states. What the extruded piece is a 4 ft bar with slots so you can use it as a straight fence face and the slots like “T” tracks for stops and such. I can say it is a very nice system and when got into Marc’s system dedicated router table to set up Kreg tools was wanting somewhere around $700. for the router table and system. I have used both and would take Marcs any day over Kreg’s as it is too hard to keep adjusted and Marc’s system you can go from a regular saw blade to installing and cutting beaded face frames without a lot of adjustment and takes very little time and the best part is that it is accurate. https://youtu.be/ODPmm4nU8lc watch it an I think you will be impressed.

-- Jay-- Cabinet Technology

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