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Working with recycled timber #86: MushroomSeat Mk III secretly underway.

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Blog entry by robscastle posted 11-12-2018 07:37 AM 970 reads 0 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 85: Finishing the Potato Crate models Part 86 of Working with recycled timber series Part 87: Mushroom seat Mk III continunes or Pt2 »

After having my wife bless my work at the finish post I have secretly started No 3 in a hope I dont get busted and loose yet another Work seat/step stool.

After seven years I could not remember how I made the original one so it was all re discovery work.

I had no worries about making the base sections from recycled pine this time as the previous one lasted 7 years outside so that will do me.

I used the same incorrect process to cut them as per the Mk II seat and did the biscuit cut outs today then hid them all away from prying eyes.

This time I will again use No 20 biscuits and pocket holes, hoping it will make the assembly more managable. I will also go see if there is a better method the join them all together.
The outside faces will receive some sort of router work on them, not sure how I will do that but its gotta be improvement from the original otherwise learning has not taken place.

I know one fact documenting the process saves a lot of time for the additional builds.

I had to remake the biscuit Jig as I had no recollection as to how I did the cut outs before.

The jig for the biscuit cuts:

Note :This Jig is unecessary if you know how to use your Biscuit Cutter correctly.

Picture No 1 showing an off cut from the tapering work as a angle guide.

Its handed, so once a side was done I needed to dismantle it and do the other edge, nothing too complicated I just used a square and some edge off cuts to setup the correct position so the biscuits cuts perfectly matched each ajoining section.

Here is a section set up on the jig.

Picture 2 Showing the joining section set up at 90 degrees or parallel to the biscuit jointer face.

Then another shot showing the indexing block.

Picture No 3 showing the indexing block and a section of masonite to raise the cutter blade to exactly mid way of the edge. The indexing block ensures the section is flat on the surface and holds every in place.

And finally the results to date.

To be continued in a few days as I have a few non woodworking tasks to do.

-- Regards Rob



8 comments so far

View crowie's profile

crowie

2741 posts in 2152 days


#1 posted 11-12-2018 08:44 AM

Clever and innovative Rob….

-- Lifes good, Enjoy each new day...... Cheers from "On Top DownUnder" Crowie

View stefang's profile

stefang

16133 posts in 3536 days


#2 posted 11-12-2018 11:18 AM

Better with the biscuits than the pocket screws Rob.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

2088 posts in 1022 days


#3 posted 11-12-2018 01:24 PM

rc, If I’m seeing it correctly, are you pushing the biscuiter on a flat base into an angled timber. I would have thought if you angled the “biscuiter’s fence” and referenced it from the top of the boards, you would have been able to get the adjacent angles right… after a bit of maths…

Now if you understood the above… gimme a Pauline Hanson… please explain (2 me)!

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

5482 posts in 2406 days


#4 posted 11-12-2018 08:57 PM

OK here is my PH explanation.

The biscuits need to be at 90 degrees to each side of the 22.14 Joint face to align correctly.
To achive this I could have raised the biscuit cutter off the surface to match the section at 90 deg or raise the section edge to match the biscuit cutters face I.E. 90 degrees to each other or parallel.

As I had edge offcuts from the tapered sections already I just used them to align the section.

Picture No 4.

What gives its starting to rain while I am explaining stuff?

Now at this stage I had dismantled the jig so the indexing block and masonite are gone away.

Picture No 5

Here is damp view of the support angle and everything set at 90 degrees if ready to cut.

When it stops raining I will go check my biscuit cutter to see if the face is adjustable, I dont think it is otherwise I am a DH!

-- Regards Rob

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

5482 posts in 2406 days


#5 posted 11-12-2018 09:07 PM

OK here is my PH explanation.

The biscuits need to be at 90 degrees to each side of the 22.14 Joint face to align correctly.
To achive this I could have raised the biscuit cutter off the surface to match the section at 90 deg or raise the section edge to match the biscuit cutters face I.E. 90 degrees to each other or parallel.

As I had edge offcuts from the tapered sections already I just used them to align the section.

Picture No 4.

What gives its starting to rain while I am explaining stuff?

-- Regards Rob

View degoose's profile

degoose

7245 posts in 3556 days


#6 posted 11-14-2018 07:31 AM

It is adjustable….I won’t say it…

-- Don't drink and use power tools @ lasercreationsbylarry.com.au

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

5482 posts in 2406 days


#7 posted 11-14-2018 09:09 AM

Oh no! its slappin’ time.

How easy is that!

Excuse me while I flush myself, ...RTFM comes to mind!

-- Regards Rob

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

2088 posts in 1022 days


#8 posted 11-14-2018 09:42 AM



...RTFM comes to mind!...
- robscastle

Guilty, hate reading… must admit I’d rather WTFV… Watch The …. Video!

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

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