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J-B Weld

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Blog entry by richgreer posted 02-09-2010 04:28 PM 2064 reads 0 times favorited 20 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Does anyone have any experience with J-B Weld? I have a situation where I want to weld a piece of steel to a piece of cast iron. I don’t own a welder and, even if I rented one, it has been over 40 years since I welded anything. I’m wondering is J-B Weld would work for me. I’ve never used it.

I have 2 nice flat surfaces with lots of metal to metal contact and the joint will not be subject to very much stress or vibration.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.



20 comments so far

View lumberdog's profile (online now)

lumberdog

226 posts in 1919 days


#1 posted 02-09-2010 04:43 PM

I have used it in the past, i once repaired the teeth on the gears in the lower case on a small boat motor and i used that motor for twenty year after that and had no problems with it. I have also used it to fix stripped out threads. all i can say is give it a try. good luck….Jim

-- Lumberdog.. Michigan

View Frankie Talarico Jr.'s profile

Frankie Talarico Jr.

353 posts in 2008 days


#2 posted 02-09-2010 04:57 PM

I used it on many applications, And depending on your situation, I am sure it will hold as long as its not subject to sideways force. In other words it works great on straight force applications, such as hanging a weight from a wire, but not so strong to create a bridge with force in the center.

-- Live by what you believe, not what they want you to believe.

View jackass's profile

jackass

350 posts in 2365 days


#3 posted 02-09-2010 05:03 PM

I have a friend that has a auto body shop, he swears by it, and says it will fix the teeth on the worm gear on my table saw, all I have to do is take it apart for him. Good recommendation.
Jack

-- Jack Keefe Shediac NB Canada

View crosseyedcarver's profile

crosseyedcarver

226 posts in 1689 days


#4 posted 02-09-2010 05:16 PM

I have used it a couple of times. It works great just make sure the surface is really clean and not greasy.

-- Tim, Tallahasse FL

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4524 posts in 1726 days


#5 posted 02-09-2010 05:21 PM

On getneds comment – - I read that to say attaching a piece of angle iron to a vertical piece of steel and then applying some downward pressure on the angle iron would be “sideways force” and not recommended. However, it I attached an angle iron to the underside of a horizontal piece and applied downward force it would work better.

Am I right?

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View papadan's profile

papadan

1152 posts in 2020 days


#6 posted 02-09-2010 05:22 PM

Without knowing what you’re doing I would not recommend JB as a glue to put pieces together. It works pretty good as a repair to worn or chipped metal though. You said flat steel to flat cast iron, can they be bolted together? If you try it as a glue, make sure the pieces are really rough to give the JB some tooth to grab onto.

-- Carpenter assembles with hands, Designer builds with brains, Artist creates with heart!

View Bradford's profile

Bradford

1434 posts in 2475 days


#7 posted 02-09-2010 05:54 PM

And I’d say, clean your metals with denatured alcohol or a solvent that doesn’t leave any residue behind. But make your bond immediately to prevent flash rusting.

-- so much wood, so little time. Bradford. Wood-a-holics unanimous president

View THEGREATPUMPKIN's profile

THEGREATPUMPKIN

56 posts in 1760 days


#8 posted 02-09-2010 05:58 PM

Rich, I don’t know if its OK to post a link to another site , If not moderators please delete, but this site thread may help .The poster is Harry ,he seems to have alot oe knowledge on the subject. Hope this helps. JIM
http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?t=132219&highlight=weld

-- A day without sawdust is like a day without sunshine

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112080 posts in 2229 days


#9 posted 02-09-2010 06:04 PM

I’ve used it and found it does best as a filler rather than a welding substitute.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View papadan's profile

papadan

1152 posts in 2020 days


#10 posted 02-09-2010 06:14 PM

I will let “harry” at SMC have his say in that link and just laugh to myself. I’ve only been welding, brazing, soldering for about 40 years now, and I preheat cast iron and stick weld it with nickle all the time. LOL

-- Carpenter assembles with hands, Designer builds with brains, Artist creates with heart!

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4524 posts in 1726 days


#11 posted 02-09-2010 06:15 PM

I’m a cautious person. For me, the J-B Weld was an alternative to taking my stuff to a welding shop and dealing with the inconvenience and the price.

The link provided by THEGREATPUMPKIN was very insightful. Thank you. And the comment by a1Jim, effectively, confirmed what the link said. J-B weld is a good filler and it is not a good welding substitute. Also, if the J-B Weld fails it leaves behind a residue that makes it very hard to weld it with a conventional welder. I’m going to a welding shop.

Thanks to all for your insight. LJ is truly a group of great people who want to help each other.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View papadan's profile

papadan

1152 posts in 2020 days


#12 posted 02-09-2010 06:17 PM

Can’t be tapped and bolted Rich?

-- Carpenter assembles with hands, Designer builds with brains, Artist creates with heart!

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4524 posts in 1726 days


#13 posted 02-09-2010 06:25 PM

In response to Papadan – It cannot be bolted but I had not thought about tapping it. That may be the solution. Thank you for the question that became, for me, a suggestion.

I don’t know much about working with metal, but I assume that tapping cast iron is easier than tapping steel. This will be a piece of cast iron that is about a 1/4 inch thick. Is that enough to hold a bolt?

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View papadan's profile

papadan

1152 posts in 2020 days


#14 posted 02-09-2010 06:29 PM

1/4” cast will thread easy, I would use the smallest size you can get away with. Anything bigger than 3/8” would not give enough threads in the plate to hold secure.

-- Carpenter assembles with hands, Designer builds with brains, Artist creates with heart!

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4524 posts in 1726 days


#15 posted 02-09-2010 06:38 PM

WOW – You guys are great. Thank you all.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

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