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Slabinator

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Blog entry by rhett posted 11-15-2015 02:23 PM 948 reads 0 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Thought I would share pics of the slab flattening machine I am constantly upgrading. Made from 80/20 extrusion, it’s basically a CNC minus the computer and motor drives. While it could be converted, I like to manually run the router, so I have control over the cut.

Here’s the basic machine:

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Slabs are held down via a vacuum table. Super simple design using a shop vac and weatherstripping.

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The router is held steady on the track with linear bearings and a mount made exclusively for the PC router. Much safer than the traditional sled where the router can tip and/or jump up.

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Had to get creative with height adjustment as the riser has no lock without a motor attached.

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Surfacing is done with an indexable head, utilizing mini carbide cutters. These can be rotated should they chip.
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This machines is a bit overkill for anyone needing to surface a single slab but is proving indispensable in my shop, as I seem to be doing a lot of live-edge tables lately.

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It does a very nice job and makes tables that are too large for industrial machines, possible.

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Thanks for looking. Hope it helps someone out.

-- Doubt kills more dreams than failure.



9 comments so far

View Tugboater78's profile

Tugboater78

2446 posts in 1654 days


#1 posted 11-15-2015 02:28 PM

Nice Rhett!

-- "....put that handsaw to work and make it earn its keep. - summerfi" <==< JuStiN >==>=->

View Ryan Corrigan's profile

Ryan Corrigan

70 posts in 3545 days


#2 posted 11-15-2015 02:38 PM

Rhett,
Nice work as always. I’m curious as to the raw material cost for the slabinator. I’m contemplating building something similar. Minus the motor and vacuum board/table stand. How my children if you don’t mind. Thanks,
Ryan

-- Ryan Corrigan Sadieville, KY http://www.CelticCrossWood.com

View rhett's profile

rhett

734 posts in 3129 days


#3 posted 11-15-2015 03:08 PM

Ryan,

Tough to give a real number as I have been piece milling this thing together for the past year or so. There is roughly 1k worth of 80/20 in the table, once you factor in the 5 or so linear bearings, which are the most expensive part of the aluminum build.

If you’re still in Sadieville, I flatten slabs for quite a few other makers in the area and also offer planing services up to 25”.

Rhett

-- Doubt kills more dreams than failure.

View WoodworkingManiak's profile

WoodworkingManiak

12 posts in 1758 days


#4 posted 11-15-2015 05:22 PM

That thing is a beast! I like your vacuum table idea.

-- Timothy Babb aka WoodworkingManiak - Located in Shelbyville, KY - https://www.woodworkingmaniak.com

View Ryan Corrigan's profile

Ryan Corrigan

70 posts in 3545 days


#5 posted 11-15-2015 05:25 PM

What are your shop rates for flattening and surface planing.
Ryan

-- Ryan Corrigan Sadieville, KY http://www.CelticCrossWood.com

View Tugboater78's profile

Tugboater78

2446 posts in 1654 days


#6 posted 11-15-2015 06:16 PM

I outta load my workbench slab up and bring it down!

-- "....put that handsaw to work and make it earn its keep. - summerfi" <==< JuStiN >==>=->

View Kaleb the Swede's profile

Kaleb the Swede

1727 posts in 1431 days


#7 posted 11-16-2015 03:43 AM

That is really cool! Thanks for sharing that

-- Just trying to build something beautiful

View Gixxerjoe04's profile

Gixxerjoe04

835 posts in 1038 days


#8 posted 12-12-2015 06:15 AM

How much do you charge to flatten a slab? I’m in Lexington, got a couple slabs in my shop, haven’t decided if I want to build a flattening jig or not, don’t know if my skil router will hold up to the job.

View rhett's profile

rhett

734 posts in 3129 days


#9 posted 12-12-2015 12:26 PM

Large slab flattening is variable and priced by the sq foot/passes required to achieve a flat surface, so prices vary by condition and size of slab. A typical sawmill slab, as an example 2’x8’, flat and planed runs $150. I also provide glue line joint services if you want to glue two slabs together, or I will do the joining too. Options can go as far as dropping off wood and picking up a completely finished top.

I welcome and try to help any and all woodworkers, on projects they may not have skill or machinery to complete.

-- Doubt kills more dreams than failure.

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