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What is a custom billiards table?

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Blog entry by Greg Gimbel posted 06-17-2017 05:50 PM 562 reads 0 times favorited 3 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I have been playing around with infographics for promoting our business. This was the first one I did, what do you think?

-- Greg Gimbel, Rifle, Colorado, http://roaringforkcustombilliards.com



3 comments so far

View Rich's profile

Rich

1702 posts in 370 days


#1 posted 06-17-2017 06:32 PM

Be sure to highlight structural features as well as custom ones. As a former ranking amateur in the mid west, I take very seriously how balls come off the rails, and what they sound like when they do. It’s the difference between a tournament quality table and a basement playroom one. How are the rails constructed, what grade of cushion material are you using, what is the bed made of — is it slate, and if so, is it one piece, or several (usually three on lesser tables). What grades of felt are available. How are the pockets constructed. What systems do you use for leveling. The list goes on and on.

You have a good looking web site. If you can include more information on construction details, maybe even with cut-away drawings of what’s in it, it will help highlight your product’s quality. Lots of buyers care mostly about appearance, but a serious player wants to know how it’s constructed as well.

I still have my Viking cue I paid $125 for in 1972. It’s worth a tad more than that today.

Also, as an interesting aside, I knew McDermott back in Milwaukee. I was looking for a special shaft for my Viking and contacted him. He was working out of his basement at the time and wanted to replace the joint on my cue before he did a shaft since the Viking joint wasn’t available for him to buy. Honestly, he looked like a hobbyist, so I moved on. Pretty funny considering where the company is today.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View Greg Gimbel's profile

Greg Gimbel

50 posts in 151 days


#2 posted 06-17-2017 06:52 PM



Be sure to highlight structural features as well as custom ones. As a former ranking amateur in the mid west, I take very seriously how balls come off the rails, and what they sound like when they do. It s the difference between a tournament quality table and a basement playroom one. How are the rails constructed, what grade of cushion material are you using, what is the bed made of — is it slate, and if so, is it one piece, or several (usually three on lesser tables). What grades of felt are available. How are the pockets constructed. What systems do you use for leveling. The list goes on and on.

You have a good looking web site. If you can include more information on construction details, maybe even with cut-away drawings of what s in it, it will help highlight your product s quality. Lots of buyers care mostly about appearance, but a serious player wants to know how it s constructed as well.

I still have my Viking cue I paid $125 for in 1972. It s worth a tad more than that today.

Also, as an interesting aside, I knew McDermott back in Milwaukee. I was looking for a special shaft for my Viking and contacted him. He was working out of his basement at the time and wanted to replace the joint on my cue before he did a shaft since the Viking joint wasn t available for him to buy. Honestly, he looked like a hobbyist, so I moved on. Pretty funny considering where the company is today.

- RichTaylor

Rich,

Excellent feed back and pointers. I have always been pretty careful about how much info I put out there about the construction of my tables. There are lot of woodwork hacks out there that can not come up with their own ideas and just copy everyone else.
My tables are built with 3 piece 1” backed slate. The rails are solid hardwoods with K-66 bumpers and we use leather buckets from hood leather to catch the balls. The leveling of the table is a system I came up with that is rock solid and is super easy to use. This is one item that I keep to myself, other than the folks that buy a table of course. The frame is also an area I choose to keep closely guarded. Before building pool tables I built log homes and did a fair amount of timber work. I have taken pieces of that work and incorporated that into the frame of my tables. Having setup hundreds of other manufacturers pool tables I can confidently say you will not find a stronger more sturdy table out there.
Thanks again for the response. You have given me some new ideas on a new blog post for the website. You are right that there is more info that I can provide and will do so. Have a great day!!

-- Greg Gimbel, Rifle, Colorado, http://roaringforkcustombilliards.com

View Rich's profile

Rich

1702 posts in 370 days


#3 posted 06-17-2017 07:09 PM

I can see how it is a fine line between highlighting construction features and keeping company secrets safe. They are beautiful tables for sure, Greg, and you definitely have the credentials to inspire confidence in their quality. Those custom diamonds are really cool. I’d want $10 Gold Eagles on mine :)

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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