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PREMIER FUSION FREUD

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Review by doyoulikegumwood posted 11-04-2009 09:02 PM 6609 views 0 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch
PREMIER FUSION FREUD No-picture-s No-picture-s Click the pictures to enlarge them

well here goes the story

i own 2 WWII’s i my spare was off being sharpened and i was doing some cross cutting on a TS (i have the sliding miter table on my uni saw) well i messed up when putting the the rail onto the table and was feeding a panel into the saw and ding ran my blade into the aluminum. long story short here i am with out a decent blade in the middle of project.

off to rockler i go

so i have Mindy get me out a brand spankin new WWII out of the case and i start griping about shelling our 130 bucks when i own 2 of this same blade long story short she talks me into buying a fusion blade.

I of course being a Minnesotan “Second most stubborn people on the planet” and Scottish”Most stubborn people on the planet” resisted this in every fashion possible but i am also frugal and it saved me 40 bucks or so.

well here’s the verdict the blade is awesome to say the least.

so ill compare

this blade dose a great job ripping up to say about 1 inch thick and isn’t recommended past 1 1/2 inches any way but it dose give a good clean cut. my biggest complaint is feed rate when ripping it seems to feed slower then the WWII. the quality here is is pretty much the same ether way “WWII vs Fusion”

cross cutting on the table saw is where i really liked this blade it gave me great clean cuts with almost zero tear out. out preformed the WWII as far as I’m concerned

i wasn’t as impressed when i loaded into my makita sliding compound saw though but the makita dose come with one heck of a blade in it from the factory. the fusion to me in the slider felt like i had to almost force it threw the work piece. i don’t know it could be just me but i never liked the feel of the WWII in the miter saw ether but never felt like i had to force the WWII when i have used it in the miter saw.

all and all the blade out preformed my expectations by leeps and bounds so much so that after reading reviews on the glue line I’m really thinking about picking one up.

hope this helps

Jason

-- I buy tools so i can make more money,so ican buy more tools so I can work more, to make more money, so I can buy more tool, so I can work more




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doyoulikegumwood

384 posts in 2714 days



10 comments so far

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Craftsman on the lake

2408 posts in 2159 days


#1 posted 11-04-2009 11:32 PM

Review?

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

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doyoulikegumwood

384 posts in 2714 days


#2 posted 11-04-2009 11:36 PM

sorry craftsmen i think that fixed it that was strange i think it was the < that messed it up

-- I buy tools so i can make more money,so ican buy more tools so I can work more, to make more money, so I can buy more tool, so I can work more

View RexMcKinnon's profile

RexMcKinnon

2593 posts in 1917 days


#3 posted 11-04-2009 11:42 PM

Great review. I’m using a ridgid combo blade 50 tooth on the TS and a ridgid 90 tooth crosscut blade on the SCMS at the moment. Love them both but they are due to be cleand or sharpened. Magazines rate the Freud and Ridgid very closely but user reviews seem to favour the Freud. I am due for a backup blade I think. Going to have to try the Freud.

-- If all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail!

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doyoulikegumwood

384 posts in 2714 days


#4 posted 11-04-2009 11:48 PM

rex

that’s what i bought it for, but it a steadily becoming my go to blade even tho i have 2 WWII. not that the WWII’s don’t get used this is just finding it’s way into my saw more often then i had planed

-- I buy tools so i can make more money,so ican buy more tools so I can work more, to make more money, so I can buy more tool, so I can work more

View FFURNITURE's profile

FFURNITURE

21 posts in 2308 days


#5 posted 11-05-2009 05:32 AM

I have been a FREUD user for 20 years, even after seeing WWII’S for years. I use a thin kerf Freud build for sliders, there are different blades, for different uses.

A fair substitute for all cutting is a Freud Combination blade.

Pros: Teflon Coated, Tension ring to prevent warpage.

Con: Finding someone to face grind the teeth. There is very little on top of the tooth, and top grind goes into the shoulder, ruining the blade.

-- Clamps are like dollars in the bank, you NEVER can have too many!

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11678 posts in 2409 days


#6 posted 11-05-2009 08:24 AM

Nice review on the Freud , but you really shouldn’t be using TableSaw blades on Miter saws. The Miter saw blades have an entirely different HOOK angle to the teeth than the table saw blades do . Most MS blades are between -5and +5 degrees Hook angle and your WWII is +20 degrees and the Freud is +18 degrees Hook angle. Major safety issue for you and also the reason that they don’t perform as well in your chop saw as the original blade does. I love my Freud blades and I do have the correct ones in both of my saws . I hope this helps you and others to work more safely in your shops : )

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

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FFURNITURE

21 posts in 2308 days


#7 posted 11-05-2009 08:41 AM

Dusty, I agree with you 100%. All of my miter/slide blades are negative hook. I’m not
a very big fan of positive hook blades, after wrapping a co-workers hand up
to go to the hospital, many years ago. The blade just pulled him in.

Freud blades do have many features that negate bad characteristics.
that are found in typically-configured blades. Whether the blade is correct or not,
they are safer due to these features (anti-kick back, Teflon, tooth reliefs, tension ring, etc).
I am a fan of other blades, like Amana, but Freud seems to offer the best value.

-- Clamps are like dollars in the bank, you NEVER can have too many!

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doyoulikegumwood

384 posts in 2714 days


#8 posted 11-05-2009 04:39 PM

guys i understand this but booth blades are sold as being usable in a Miter saw so i tested them their.

just trying to give a complete review of the blade.

i have to agree that nether the WWII or the fusion should be used in the miter saw. there are far better blades for those applications.

-- I buy tools so i can make more money,so ican buy more tools so I can work more, to make more money, so I can buy more tool, so I can work more

View Routerisstillmyname's profile

Routerisstillmyname

713 posts in 2230 days


#9 posted 11-06-2009 12:25 AM

As I’ve said before, Always amazed with Freud never disappointed.

-- Router è ancora il mio nome.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5560 posts in 2097 days


#10 posted 11-06-2009 05:30 AM

Nice review Jason! You can use a blade with a reasonably positive hook on a standard CMS, but for a sliding CMS it should be a low to negative hook to prevent self feeding.

The Freud Fusion is quite a bit different than most 40T general purpose blades….the Infinity Super General is the only other blade I know of that’s similar…Hi-ATB grind, steep positive hook, and a double side grind for a polished edge. I think you highlighted the pros and cons of that design well….excellent cut quality, excellent crosscuts and ply cuts, not as efficient at ripping. I saw the Fusion demoed by Jerry Coles at a wwing show when it first came out and was impressed, but have not had the chance to spin one on my own saw yet. I will say that the Super General is the cleanest cutting general purpose blade I’ve used to date and would expect the Fusion to perform similarly…based on your review, reports from others, and Wood Mag’s comments, it sounds like it does.

Is the “glue line” blade you mentioned the 30T LM74 ripper? If so, it’ll do exactly what it claims to do, but I’m not sure what capability you’d gain that you don’t already have….it has a fairly narrow operating range. It’s only designed to rip up to ~ 1”, and doesn’t crosscut well. Your WWII and Fusion will both leave a glue line edge, will cut wood at least as thick (actually thicker), and offer the benefit of good crosscuts and good ply cuts. The LM74 is a good choice for a straight ripping operation for 1” material or less, and the triple chip grind is very durable. Now if you’re talking about the 24T LM72, that’s a different story…very efficient bulk ripper that’ll chew through really thick material that your 40T blades won’t handle….I know they label the LM72 as a “Glue Line Rip Blade” too, but it’s not as clean as the 30T or 40T blades.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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