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Small shop lights 36" Led $30

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Review by htl posted 06-15-2017 11:09 PM 1667 views 0 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Small shop lights 36" Led $30 No-picture-s No-picture-s Click the pictures to enlarge them

Needed some more light in my small, small shop and was looking at Home Depot when I spy-ed these cheap Led lights with plug and chain. $30
Just hang it and it works.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Commercial-Electric-3-ft-LED-Black-Shop-Light-54254141/206028863

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.




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htl

2977 posts in 943 days



12 comments so far

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oldrivers

1168 posts in 1350 days


#1 posted 06-15-2017 11:25 PM

Good for you and they are bright for their size, thanks for sharing.

-- Soli Deo gloria!

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Mainiac Matt

7302 posts in 2112 days


#2 posted 06-16-2017 02:37 AM

I put the same light in my basement…. It is bright indeed

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

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Rick_M

10290 posts in 2164 days


#3 posted 06-16-2017 02:45 AM

The ballasts on my shop lights are starting to go and instead of replacing them I think I’ll put in LED s.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View crowie's profile

crowie

1959 posts in 1734 days


#4 posted 06-16-2017 06:28 AM

This is totally mean Bruce, You folk in the USA have such a great range of suppliers to source top deals like this unlike us in The Great Southern Land with very few to choice from or to compete for our sales…

-- Lifes good, Enjoy each new day...... Cheers from "On Top DownUnder" Crowie

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taoist

124 posts in 2275 days


#5 posted 06-21-2017 08:24 PM

Hate to let you all know but Costco had the 48” model on sale for $25.00 for awhile. They are back to $30.00 now if they are in stock.

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htl

2977 posts in 943 days


#6 posted 06-22-2017 12:00 AM

Costco may be cheap but once I would add in the few times I would go there it’s not much savings for me, but for those able to use the bulk saving that would be great.

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View bill1608's profile

bill1608

10 posts in 959 days


#7 posted 06-22-2017 12:21 AM

My pet peeve is glaring lights. Screw-in LED bulbs are intense and very glary. Florescent lights are pretty good. LED florescent-style tubes are somewhere in between. I like the LED shop lights that have even light output over the entire surface and are not so intense. Same light output, just not concentrated in such a small area. I just bought 12 of them and am pretty happy with them. The light color isn’t ideal, but they are ok. Since I still have some florescents left, as they are going bad one by one, the color mix helps.

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htl

2977 posts in 943 days


#8 posted 06-22-2017 01:25 AM

I just bought the light to help in the middle of the shop, there are windows on both sides, but I filler one half way up with an air conditioner and today it was way dark and cloudy.
The one light saved the day by lighting up the whole shop, I think I will get one more and put them at the 1/3 mark, for my small shop this should get er done.
I should add at this time I’m running the shop off a 50’ Heavy Duty extension cord so the less electric draw the better.

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View curliejones's profile

curliejones

176 posts in 2050 days


#9 posted 06-27-2017 12:01 AM

I’ve noticed a few sales on LED “shop lights” lately and for a fill-in spot, they may work out fine. Most in-depth discussions of led lighting include reminders to be aware of lumens (light output) and lumens per watt. Checking the specs on this particular light, it has about 10% more output than a single 48” fluorescent bulb. I’ve seen some LED “shop lights” that require wattage close to 48” fluorescent shop lights ( 2×32w bulbs) for a lumen output that is actually less. I’m not sure how they can accomplish this inefficiency, but I’m simply reading their specs. Hopefully, the LED version will be maintenance free for years, but it just reminds us all that the “devil is in the details”. Before spending your next bandsaw on a lighting makeover, do the math!

-- Like Guy Clark sez - "Sometimes I use my head, Sometimes I get a bigger hammer"

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Tennessee

2522 posts in 2298 days


#10 posted 06-28-2017 11:12 PM

I have four of the 48” LED lights sold by Walmart, the “Lights of America” LED shop light, 48”. $38 bucks a pop.
I have to say, they provide much brighter light than my old fluorescent units do, but I have to agree, they are a bit on the edgy side and the light is a bit too sharp for my tastes. Too far into the blue spectrum, to be honest. I have resisted replacing the traditional fluorescent directly over my usual work place, instead putting them up around my lathes, and two behind me where I usually do work on my bench.

I am on the fence on whether or not to commit to full LED. I know it will save me money, and make the shop brighter. And therein lies the problem – when is a shop TOO bright?

That is what I am fighting, and I have a while, since I have a few replacement fluorescent bulbs remaining for replacements for my remaining florescent lights. the LED’s do very well around my lathes… but are just too sharp and demanding around my workbench where finishes are applied and color is determined.

I should mention that I have low ceilings, about 7.5 feet. The lights are close.

-- Tsunami Guitars and Custom Woodworking, Cleveland, TN

View htl's profile

htl

2977 posts in 943 days


#11 posted 06-28-2017 11:34 PM

”I should mention that I have low ceilings, about 7.5 feet. The lights are close.”
That close I can see the problem, maybe have them off at an angle for a little more distance.
My shop has regular walls but I have no ceiling as such just insulation at the trusses so have a little more distance from me and them.
It works great for me but my eyes ain’t what they used to be so need all the light I can get when using the table saw and the like.
Mainly for me it’s the price, just don’t need to be putting that much in to them right now.

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View curliejones's profile

curliejones

176 posts in 2050 days


#12 posted 07-21-2017 12:30 AM


I am on the fence on whether or not to commit to full LED. I know it will save me money, and make the shop brighter. And therein lies the problem – when is a shop TOO bright?

That is what I am fighting, and I have a while, since I have a few replacement fluorescent bulbs remaining for replacements for my remaining florescent lights. the LED s do very well around my lathes… but are just too sharp and demanding around my workbench where finishes are applied and color is determined.

I should mention that I have low ceilings, about 7.5 feet. The lights are close.

- Tennessee

Greetings, Tennessee! LED lights have made great strides in the two years since I completed my shop and their rapid development should continue for a while. In my opinion, you want to really pay attention to CRI color rendering index and K the color light emitted, as well as the basic comparison for lumens, or amount of light emitted. The range for K, color, is broad in LED lighting going from a yellow 2700K to a very blue 6500K. You can find volumes written on these basic properties and one bit of advice that I came across is very important, as well. Determine the color finishes of your projects in light that is comparable to where those projects will “live”. For example, if you like the mellow color of yellow light, such as from incandescent light bulbs, in your living room, den, and bedroom, then have lighting in your finishing area of the shop that matches that color if the finished project will be used there. Many CFL bulbs are available over a broad color range and would actually allow you to change lighting color for different projects . Kitchen and utility areas often have more blue light, perhaps in the 4000K range but I personally do not like the 6000K range for woodworking; I find the color offensive. I do like that it feels brighter and I feel it appropriate for outdoor motion lights, spotlights, etc. BTW, I have 4-bulb T8 fluorescent fixtures at 8 ft and I use 3000K bulbs in some and 4000K bulbs in others. A project can be finished under a more yellow (3000K) area or under a brighter (4000k) area. I would not want to judge the color of a finish on wood under a very blue light, such as 6000K and expect it to look right inside my home. With the 7.5 ft close fixtures, I’d certainly stay around 4000K whether it be with Fluorescent or LED lighting. – Also, there are currently replacement tubes for your fluorescent fixtures but the lumens to watts ratio varies quite a bit and so will your projected savings. Some of the specs show there would be little to no savings on energy, but hopefully they would excel at longevity. That seems to me not enough to merit a change. One other caveat to be aware of if you replace tubes in your current fixtures is that some LED tubes are ballast compatible while others require you to rewire the fixture to bypass the ballast. I hope some of this is new to you and helps your transition. Personally, I’m sticking with fluorescent tubes for a bit longer since LED cheap tubes run $8-10 each and are suspect for efficiency while what seems to be better LED tubes run $15-20.

-- Like Guy Clark sez - "Sometimes I use my head, Sometimes I get a bigger hammer"

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