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Bosch 5412L/T4B Combo Makes The Cut

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Review by CanuckGal posted 1714 days ago 7789 views 0 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Bosch 5412L/T4B Combo Makes The Cut Bosch 5412L/T4B Combo Makes The Cut Bosch 5412L/T4B Combo Makes The Cut Click the pictures to enlarge them

It might not seem right for a person such as myself to be reviewing and rating a compound miter saw because I don’t have a lot of experience with them or many different models. But I think it’s suffice to say if a novice can buy and assemble one of these and use it within minutes of setup AND make dead on accurate cuts and miters then the saw almost speaks for itself.

This is true of the Bosch 5412L 12” Sliding Dual Compound Miter Saw and Bosch T4B Gravity Rise Miter Saw Stand. Although mine is only a “hobby shop” this saw is most definitely in the professional/contractor saw league. The saw combined with the stand is made for portability and easy setup and storage. Even a small hobby shop can reap the benefits of this powerhouse without compromising valuable shop space.

The Bosch 5412L 12” saw is a serious power tool for any woodworker. You can find all the specifications at Bosch Tools and there are a long list of features as well. It comes packed in a heavy shipping carton with ample Styrofoam padding. Bosch didn’t miss anything with this saw. It even had a convenient cord wrap attachment. If there is a specific feature you are looking for in a miter saw I guarantee you this one has it. The construction is solid, it feels like it’s ready to take on any project. Nothing wobbles, wiggles or rattles, no cheap snap off plastic parts. Everything slides and moves like it’s supposed to with one small exception. The bevel adjustment lock knob on the front of the saw is a little disappointing. I often had to push or pull the head to get it to engage or disengage. There is nothing smooth about it’s operation at all. It has three settings that are also a little confusing, 45-0 Left, 0-45 Right, and Max Range. The first setting allows you to tilt the head left and will lock the head at 0 when you return it. The second allows you to tilt the head right but I couldn’t find a locking position at any setting. The third setting allows you to tilt the head either way.

Setting up cuts with this saw requires careful attention. There are numerous things that have to be locked or unlocked, and for bevel cuts you may have to adjust the two piece sliding fence. For 45 degree bevel cuts you won’t be able to use the provided hold down clamp. The supplied 60 tooth blade made smooth cuts in both 3/4” MDF and Oak with minimal tear out in the Oak using the provided insert. A zero clearance insert or backer board would probably eliminate any tear out. The provided plastic insert does have some small adjustability that would narrow the gap but not significantly.

Straight out of the box, the saw set up was dead square. I had perfect 90, and 45 degree cuts in both MDF and Oak in both flat and vertical cuts left and right. The only glitch was the left 45 degree tilt bevel did not cut all the way through the wood, leaving a tiny chunk right at the end of the flat cut. A small fence adjustment will probably fix this. I checked the saw with both a square and by test cuts and found no other adjustments necessary. The saw comes with one 4 mm Allen key, a double ended wrench and a socket wrench/screwdriver tool that stores right on the saw for quick adjustments and blade changes.

The saw also comes with a Laser guide that must be installed by the user. The unit is contained in a washer that simply replaces the left side blade washer. It’s powered by three A76 button cell batteries that are contained in the unit and a centrifugal switch. It also comes with 3 replacement batteries, a very nice perk. There is no other adjustment for the laser guide. Once installed it aligns with the left side of the cut when the saw is powered on.

The laser guide might sound good but I find it a bit redundant. Most wood workers will check the cut setup before turning on the saw. The laser only confirms what you already know. It isn’t activated till the saw blade starts spinning so it isn’t any help in the initial setup.

The weakest feature of this saw is of course the dust bag. Being almost a burlap type material, it may be tough, but it cannot contain fine dust like that created from MDF or similar woods. The 1 1/4” dust port might also prove annoying to connect to a dust collection system.

The stand is an exercise in simplicity and balance. The unit comes well packed in a heavy shipping carton and massive Styrofoam padding. The assembly takes about 45 minutes and can be done single handed. The assembly instructions are clear and concise and all the parts and diagrams are well labeled. The only tools required are 3 wrenches and/or sockets (10, 13, 17 mm) and a Philips head screwdriver.

The stand is finished in a metallic grey paint that is incredibly scratch and dent resistant so you’d have to work hard to mar or mark it during assembly. There are no little parts to fidget with, just plain old nuts and bolts and washers. There is no fancy mechanism for folding the table, just one cam lock lever and a twist handle that releases the spring lock pins. The unit glides up and down effortlessly.

Mounting the saw on the table is as simple as measuring the distance between the mounting holes on the saw and setting the stand cross pieces accordingly. Then four bolts attach the saw to the cross pieces permanently. To remove the saw from the stand, you unlock two cam levers on the cross pieces and lift the unit off with the cross pieces. The cross pieces then act as “feet” for any surface you want to put the saw on. The saw itself is not light, and it is bulky and awkward to carry. With the portability of the stand I can see no reason to ever remove it.

Even with the weight of the saw on the stand, the balance is so near perfect that folding or unfolding the stand can be done with ease. Release the locks, push the wheels forward with your foot and the table and saw fold to a vertical position. Lock the cam lever and you can wheel the saw anywhere. The air inflated rubber tires make it easy to push the saw over rough or uneven surfaces, or to pull the saw up stairs. It’s like it’s own built in dolly. The saw can be stored in the vertical position to save space.

The stand also has pullout extensions on either end that extend up to 28 inches each. This puts the overall length of the table at just over 8 feet, perfect for almost any job. The extensions both have double tube sliders for extra support so heavy pieces won’t be a problem. The ends of the extensions are also adjustable vertically to line up with the table or higher if necessary. There are two leveling pads on the bottom front frame as well.

The saw and stand combo is the “Binford Cadillac” of Miter Saws! The only other thing required is a skilled woodworker to benefit from all the exceptional features and abilities of this rugged instrument.

-- EGO postulo , EGO venalicium , EGO incidere. I measured, I marked, I cut. Latin instructions for firewood.




View CanuckGal's profile

CanuckGal

73 posts in 1715 days



14 comments so far

View reggiek's profile

reggiek

2240 posts in 1769 days


#1 posted 1714 days ago

Canuckgal, you did an excellent job!

I have this saw myself…and I love it…having all the adjustments in the front of the saw make it a breeze to use….it is a bit heavy though and ackward, as you state, and should not be considered fully portable like some of the smaller mitres from Makita…Rigid or such (which would be considered job site mitres).

The laser is impossible to see in outside light….so I wouldn’t count on it unless you use some kind of screen to cut down the glare….when it is visable, it works great to give you assurance that the blade is on your cut line.

I use a DC on mine with a hose adapter….the bag as you mention will not filter out anything but the larger particles.

I have a problem with them using Pnuematic tires…....who wants to be rolling a saw with Pnuematic tires around a job site full of loose nails and screws. I replaced them with solid rubber ones which work just as well without the possibility of getting a flat in the middle of a cut.

-- Woodworking.....My small slice of heaven!

View CanuckGal's profile

CanuckGal

73 posts in 1715 days


#2 posted 1714 days ago

You know I had my doubts about the pneumatic tires as well for the same reasons. I try to keep my shop pretty tidy, but the first time I puncture one of those tires I will be replacing them as well.

-- EGO postulo , EGO venalicium , EGO incidere. I measured, I marked, I cut. Latin instructions for firewood.

View reggiek's profile

reggiek

2240 posts in 1769 days


#3 posted 1714 days ago

Yep…they are tubed also…and the tubes are hard to find in that size….I found very good full rubber tire replacements at my local Ace Hardware store…

-- Woodworking.....My small slice of heaven!

View Mauritius's profile

Mauritius

96 posts in 1725 days


#4 posted 1714 days ago

Awesome review! I have this exact setup and I’ve used it the past few months and like you, really really enjoy it. Mine was also dead on accurate out of the box. I popped on a Forrest Chop master 80 tooth ATB and was off to the races. Like you, I don’t have anything to compare it to and am pretty much a weekend wood warrior, but I don’t regret spending the extra bucks for the saw or the stand.

I agree that the laser seems a bit redundant, I honestly don’t use it. I just like seeing the laser reflect in the dust the saw throws up.

One thing to add, that I learned the hard way a week or two ago, that the bevel setting “Max Range” actually lets you go BEYOND 45 degrees – I think it’s 48. If you’re cutting 45 degree miters make sure you are careful and keep it set to the left or right settings. I also bought a second hold down clamp for the other side so I could easily set stop blocks and hold longer boards more firmly.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

109219 posts in 2076 days


#5 posted 1714 days ago

I have this saw but a dewalt stand and the saw is great. super review.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View CanuckGal's profile

CanuckGal

73 posts in 1715 days


#6 posted 1714 days ago

I added the Forrest blades for both this saw and my table saw to my birthday wish list. So far the Bosch blade has worked well for me, but there is always room for improvement :)
I’ll be sure to check that miter setting as well, thanks for the tip!

-- EGO postulo , EGO venalicium , EGO incidere. I measured, I marked, I cut. Latin instructions for firewood.

View Don K.'s profile

Don K.

1075 posts in 1825 days


#7 posted 1713 days ago

Great review…thanks for sharing. I am going to buy a new miter saw soon as my old Dewalt has seen better days. I have it narrowed down to just two saws…this one and the new Milwaukee.

-- Don S.E. OK

View RBWoodworker's profile

RBWoodworker

416 posts in 1851 days


#8 posted 1713 days ago

Great review..I was jst looking @ a Hitachi 12” sliding compound miter.. And was wondering if those were good or??.. But now that you posted your review..I will consider the bosch.. How much are they going for these days? I notice that when people post reviews..no one ever quotes any prices so we can see if they are within budgets..lol

-- Randall Child http://www.racfurniture.com/

View SCOTSMAN's profile

SCOTSMAN

5000 posts in 2084 days


#9 posted 1713 days ago

I like your post . I have two large 12 inch delta saws and am about(that means next year) LOL to build a stand for them, as I have rollers etc.Thanks for posting and a hearty welcome I have made you a buddy of mine as I think we need more women woodworkers here on this site to educate we men.kindest regards Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

View CanuckGal's profile

CanuckGal

73 posts in 1715 days


#10 posted 1713 days ago

Don I had narrowed my chioces down to the Bosch or the Ridgid. The Ridgid looked nice on paper but not up close. Nothing else could compare with the Bosch’s multitude of features in the 12” line.
Randall, I got the saw and stand combo at Home Depot for 799.00 CDN. It was a special promo and I jumped on it because normally the saw alone sells for that price. I see on the Bosch site they have cut the price to 699.00 USD.So if you can find it anywhere for less then that go for it. Wood Shows often have the best deals on these saws.
Scotsman, thanks for adding me as a buddy! Always glad to make a friend. :)

-- EGO postulo , EGO venalicium , EGO incidere. I measured, I marked, I cut. Latin instructions for firewood.

View DocStock's profile

DocStock

12 posts in 1747 days


#11 posted 1703 days ago

Thanks for the review… I have two Dewalt 12” sliders and 1 of the Hitachi 12” sliders. What the guys are telling me is that on a millwork installation job they prefer the Hitachi because they can dial in both the miters and bevels with the LCD screen. This eliminates guessing, glasses and light to set the saw, especially on bevels.
How is the Bosch on setting bevels?

-- Glen

View CanuckGal's profile

CanuckGal

73 posts in 1715 days


#12 posted 1702 days ago

Glen I use a digital angle gauge to check the bevels before I cut. This is a habit from my old untrustworthy miter saw. But I set the bevels according to the gauge on the Bosch saw and they are pretty much right on. The farthest I have been out was .6 degrees according to the digital gauge. But I always make a test cut just in case.

-- EGO postulo , EGO venalicium , EGO incidere. I measured, I marked, I cut. Latin instructions for firewood.

View DocStock's profile

DocStock

12 posts in 1747 days


#13 posted 1701 days ago

That’s good the Bosch is set up right from the factory and is dead on. I have a store fixture installation company that goes all over the US. All of the millwork is prefinished and is sent in limited quantities. What I look for in a “production” saw is the speed in which the carpenter can make cuts. When the miter saw is setup, it is placed in a central location so multiple carpenters are using the same saw. That’s what makes the Hitachi so desireable. I have been leaning away from Dewalt for a number of years because of quality and price issues. I did not know Bosch made a 12” slider but I will seriously consider the saw next time I purchase.

-- Glen

View japanesewoodworker's profile

japanesewoodworker

68 posts in 1551 days


#14 posted 668 days ago

Sometimes you are the “best” type of reviewer.

IMHO, reviewers my “not” have the most experience with tools, but are just very good writers. Sort-ta-like newspaper reporters. All are excellent writers, Sports, Weather, Local News, and even obitutaries (?sp).

One other comment, all backup batteries have a “shelf-life”. Just like milk, or produce in the grocery store. ( ... I would not drink milk that is 12 months old, or eat ANY vegetable 6 months old…yuk!...just the thought….)

My guess is that the batteries power the “laser beams”...but I have not seen this saw.

FWIW

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