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Great way to have 220 without Electrician

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Review by reggiek posted 07-28-2009 05:02 AM 4918 views 3 times favorited 21 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Great way to have 220 without Electrician No-picture-s No-picture-s Click the pictures to enlarge them

I recently needed 220 in my new shop and had not had the chance to wire up the necessary circuits.

A friend of mine recommended that I check out this web page and buy one of these units. It uses two 115 sockets to produce the 220 voltage. I tried the unit with my table saw and was pleased to see that the saw acted the same as it had when connected to a dedicated 220 circuit. Since there were two sockets on the adapter I was also able to hook up my 220 planer and run it with the same success (not at the same time).

The units have a built in tester to make sure that you do not plug your two wires into a common 115 circuirt (you must use two dependent circuits – as using one would not give you the addition hot wire.) The unit I purchased was for the 15 amp system (Which will work for most 2 and 3 hp 220 units)...I also called and spoke with their customer support to insure that the draw I was considering would not cause a problem. I found them to be helpful and courteous…

They also supply you a tester to insure that your 115 plug is not GFI (the system will not work with GFI). You can use extension cords to reach the independent circuits…they supply two 6 foot cords attached to the units….

The price is definitely good for this equipment $160.00 plus shipping…(the unit is small and light so the shipping is around $5 – $10 depending on your location and whether you want expedited delivery)

quick220

-- Woodworking.....My small slice of heaven!




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reggiek

2240 posts in 1923 days



21 comments so far

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sIKE

1271 posts in 2407 days


#1 posted 07-28-2009 06:05 AM

You had me until the price! Ouch! But would work great for someone (aka renters) that could not install a 220v in a the rental property but need a 220v circuit.

-- //FC - Round Rock, TX - "Experience is what you get just after you need it"

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a1Jim

112086 posts in 2230 days


#2 posted 07-28-2009 06:35 AM

a bit pricy but interesting.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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TopamaxSurvivor

14742 posts in 2329 days


#3 posted 07-28-2009 06:39 AM

Quite a price for a couple cords, an outlet and a tester! I’m 99.9% sure that device will never get a UL listing. Promotes too many violations of code.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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reggiek

2240 posts in 1923 days


#4 posted 07-28-2009 04:40 PM

Actually its UL listed…and is within code of this area. They have the UL listing at the Web page….and it should be code in most areas….(their customer support should help you with that)

It is a bit pricey…but the box does have circuitry to insure you are on 2 independent circuits…it won’t light up if you aren’t (it has a Led 220v indicator)....it also has circuitry to shut down if it browns or spikes (it also has a circuit breaker that flips if you draw too much (it can also be used as a switch). So its really more than a couple of wires and a box..

I only used it temporarily…but it could be a permanent solution for some that don’t want to wire 220v circuit(s) or do not want to hire an electrician to do it. I read up and wired my own….the electricians who quoted me were way over the top on price….

My neighbor is using it now in his garage for his table saw – he wanted to test it before he thought of buying one…I told him to use it as long as he wishes…

-- Woodworking.....My small slice of heaven!

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oldskoolmodder

761 posts in 2333 days


#5 posted 07-28-2009 05:05 PM

An electrician would cost you more than $200 US to set you up with a dedicated 220 line, I see nothing wrong with the price, when you compare electrician prices. Am I against supporting a human being and making a living for his family? Not at all, but I am for saving myself a buck, if I can.

Nice find!

-- Respect your shop tools and they will respect you - Ric

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jerryz

164 posts in 1932 days


#6 posted 07-28-2009 05:23 PM

Wow, I agree that it serves a legitimate purpose, but what gets me is why they call it a converter???
The unit actually detects that the 2 inputs are connected to out of phase hot wires (220V ac) and wires them to the output.
Essentially most households have 220v ac wired in and the in load panel the 2 hot wires are distributed on the various circuits in the house.
Soo there really isn’t any conversion taking place just detection of the 2 separate Hot wires that means that you will probably need an extension cord after all what are the chances that you have 2 separate circuits in the garage?

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reggiek

2240 posts in 1923 days


#7 posted 07-28-2009 07:12 PM

I figured that the cost of the parts…plus insuring that the thing was correctly set up was worth spending the $160.00. When I talked to customer support, I was told that if the outlet was not sensing adequate amperage that it would cut power on both lines…that way you would not brown out your machine. The circuit breaker is there in case of an overdraw….To be honest this unit has a lot more safety then I have on my dedicated 220 circuit (just a 20 amp breaker).

As for two circuits in a garage…I’ve wired a few in my time…and a lot do…especially if they have a garage door opener socket wired up….or in most cases they have a laundry room nearby that can give you the other circuit…..if not…an extension cord works great (and with the low 220 draw – you don’t need some excessive gauge wire).

This product was useful for what I needed it for. I posted this so that other folks that might need something like this can have an alternative…and it was indeed a good quick solution until I made a permanent one…and $160.00 is definitely cheaper than an electrician….or running wire in finished walls (my shop was still stud wall so it was easy to wire up).

-- Woodworking.....My small slice of heaven!

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Brad_Nailor

2531 posts in 2610 days


#8 posted 07-28-2009 07:22 PM

This device has peaked my interest….let me ask
I have two separate 120V circuits in my garage/shop. The previous owner ran a 10/3 from my panel to the outlet box, then terminated the panel side into two 20 amp 120V breakers, and on the outlet side its in a quad outlet box with one circuit on each side. This allows me to run my machines on one side and my dust collection on the other. Now, could I buy this device and plug it into my outlets..one cord per side and that would work? It seems to me like it would but I am not good with electricity…
Soon I will have my shed built and my garage will be empty. I am buying a 220v table saw and jointer and was going to pay a electrician friend to run a sub panel down to my garage, but this device might work for me..even if just temporarily…but then I wouldn’t be able to run any dust collection…hmmmm

-- http://www.facebook.com/pages/DSO-Designs/297237806954248

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PurpLev

8476 posts in 2301 days


#9 posted 07-28-2009 07:29 PM

David, theoretically you shouldn’t run your DC at the same time as using this device on the same circuit, although temporarily you might be able to get by… it might trip the breaker though, and it has the potential to ruin the motors… although I currently myself am running DC and equipment on same circuit for no other options… not ideal, but doable.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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reggiek

2240 posts in 1923 days


#10 posted 07-28-2009 10:35 PM

Thanks Cessna…I don’t want to confuse anyone. This is not a Uninterruptible Power Source by any means…it does not condition the lines or continue if the breakers trip or your power fails.

I am certainly not an electrician by any means – although I have helped many in the past…..I had to bone up on quite a bit of literature until I felt comfortable wiring the 220 into my shop (I wanted a bit more than just code wiring). I wired the shop (including the 115 circuits) and checked each circuit several times…insuring I had everything up to code and that nothing had relocated during the times I pulled the wire through the studs. I didn’t hook the load center up untill all the circuits were in place. I again traced all the lines to their terminus even after I hooked them to the breakers…after all that I still had an electrician that I have worked with in the past check everything out before we threw the switch. I have always been a better safe then sorry individual…and considering I’ve had over 50 years of construction experience…without any injuries (other than wear and tear) is a testament to that.

Even after my friend recommended this item – I still called and had a nice discussion with their customer support. I recommend that anyone who has any questions on this or any other items do the same…It helps eliminate a lot of problems that you may encounter later on. I also get a sense of the company that way….I don’t want to give my money to a fly by night huxster…

-- Woodworking.....My small slice of heaven!

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TopamaxSurvivor

14742 posts in 2329 days


#11 posted 07-28-2009 11:00 PM

I didn’t see anything about the UL listing on the site, but I didn’t search very hard. The code clearly says all circuit conductors are to be in the same cable or raceway, that includes even low voltage wiring with eth last code change. I’ve seen some interesting situations in the last 40 yrs when this was violated, but it probably won’t cause much of a problem in a residential setting. Eddy curents occur in ferrous metal when the current paths surround the metal object.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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reggiek

2240 posts in 1923 days


#12 posted 07-28-2009 11:24 PM

Topamax…I’ll leave the theorizing to you as electronics is not my bag.

I was curious as to whether you are viewing this like it was a hard wire item? In that case I would probably agree that it would not be code…my understanding is that code prohibits you to put duplex 220v outlets on the same circuit…either way…I ran my permanent wiring as a single dedicated circuit for each outlet on the two runs I set up.

I have not seen a code item on 220 “extension cords” which is essentially what this comes out to be…I do note that the Quick 220 web page also gives a listing about lengths of cords and guages….so you dont do as Cessna said – causing too much resistance using too long a wire run and end up starving/damaging your motor.

I had two items hooked up to this unit…but never ran them simultaneously – their customer support was also very clear that running more than one item at a time is not recommended…I think the two outlets are misleading that way…..even though they say it is for convenience – I think they should only have one period.

All else said – this did what I needed for my situation….In all cases I think everyone needs to review their own needs/situations and make the final decision based on that. I don’t work for or receive any benefit from this company – I am just giving an opinion on something I found/used.

-- Woodworking.....My small slice of heaven!

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TopamaxSurvivor

14742 posts in 2329 days


#13 posted 07-28-2009 11:50 PM

No, I am not viewing it as a hard wire item, it would never get a UL listing for that type of installation. I’m surprised it did get one, but if UL ok’d it, that is their business.

It could potentially cause problems, but they would be primarily in a building wired with metal raceways. From an electrician’s point of view, it is a rip off for that kind of price. A layman with very limited knowledge could do the same thing for a few dollars, even though the code says all temporary wiring has to meet the code.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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reggiek

2240 posts in 1923 days


#14 posted 07-29-2009 12:08 AM

Thanks Topamax for the clarification. If there were a potential for hazard I want to warn my neighbor…he is using it in his garage which I am sure is wired with regular old romex.

After seeing how this product works, I am sure it could be duplicated….but I didn’t have the time…nor the desire to put in the time and trouble it would take to do this….I count my time as part of the cost to me…especially when I am so busy these days…I really want to optimize the miniscule free time I get and use it working with wood which is what I really enjoy.

-- Woodworking.....My small slice of heaven!

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TopamaxSurvivor

14742 posts in 2329 days


#15 posted 07-29-2009 12:42 AM

I know what you mean. Some days I have more time than money, some days more money than time. :-))

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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