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A multi tool blade that makes a difference.

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Review by devann posted 04-11-2016 05:05 AM 3020 views 1 time favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch
A multi tool blade that makes a difference. No-picture-s No-picture-s Click the pictures to enlarge them

Having used a multi-tool for a few years now I’ve come to really like this tool. My first time using was during a home remodel and I encountered a situation where I needed a notch but was afraid of the damage that a reciprocating saw would do. A chisel wasn’t an option so I bought me a cordless multi-tool that was compatible with my cordless tool batteries. I’ve since learned a 1001 uses for these things, the name really does fit.

Along the way I’ve also learned about the blades too. They’re expensive !! I can’t believe how much they cost when compared to other types of tool blades. Second thing, you get what you pay for. Cheaper blades often have hardly been worth the time it took to put them in the tool. Next, the physical shape of the blade really matters. And that is why I writing this review. I’ve basically settled on just one blade for most of the applications I encounter.


It’s the Bosch model OCS114F. This blade can be used for both wood & metal applications. They work great if you have to install flooring under those commercial door jambs. But that’s not the reason I like them so much. I like them because they are the easiest blades I’ve used to control. And that includes the Bosch model OCS112 blades hanging right next to them at the store display, the wood only version. Don’t buy the OCS112.

As near as I can tell, what makes the difference in control is the subtle radius at the cutting end of the blade and the tapered design going back to the tool. I’ve only seen this design on the model OCS114F. If the are other blades out there with the same design please let me know. Especially if they’re priced where I could save some money.

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with




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devann

2246 posts in 2842 days



10 comments so far

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runswithscissors

2848 posts in 2174 days


#1 posted 04-12-2016 03:57 AM

Grizzly blades are far cheaper than others (including HF), and the quality seems to be fine. I’m not aware that they have a blade with the profile you show in the photo, but it would be very easy to grind such a profile onto any blade.

Even their diamond and carbide coated blades are cheaper. The mounting is pretty universal, though I think they might not work on the Dremel multi tool. I use mine on HF’s multi tool.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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devann

2246 posts in 2842 days


#2 posted 04-12-2016 06:57 AM

Thanks RWS, I’ll look into the Grizzly blades. I’m not sure I agree with you about the ease of regrinding the end of a blade to achieve the kind of control needed not to cause unnecessary damage when using such a tool. The radius is so subtle I can barley see it. But I can feel it when I use the tool. BTW I have 20-10 vision. There are days when I can go to the bench grinder and sharpen a drill bit. Then there are days when I look like a 1st grader sharpening a pencil down to a nub. I bought a Drill Dr.
I’ll see what grizzly has. There are other kinds of blades for other uses I’ve found. I really do like my multi tool, sometimes it’s like having a power chisel.

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

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Redoak49

3534 posts in 2138 days


#3 posted 04-12-2016 11:01 AM

Thanks for the review…next time I need to use mine, I will try these blades.

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TopamaxSurvivor

18373 posts in 3825 days


#4 posted 04-13-2016 01:19 AM

thanks, I’ll keep it in mind.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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runswithscissors

2848 posts in 2174 days


#5 posted 04-13-2016 07:34 PM

I failed to notice you were referring to the profile at the end of the blade, because the end doesn’t show in the photo. I thought you meant the side curvatures.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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devann

2246 posts in 2842 days


#6 posted 04-14-2016 02:37 AM

Yes that picture is a little large. I got it off the Bosch website. If you click on it you can see it in detail. It was easier than me taking one out in the shop.

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

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runswithscissors

2848 posts in 2174 days


#7 posted 04-14-2016 08:47 PM

Okay, I see what you mean.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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devann

2246 posts in 2842 days


#8 posted 04-15-2016 01:22 AM

I went to the Grizzly website and checked out their blades. I ordered one. Only one, because to be honest from all that I could tell from the info on the website they look just like all the inexpensive ones I’ve already tried. I couldn’t find anywhere a country of origin about where they were made. The Bosch multi tool blades I prefer are like all the jigsaw blades I prefer. They all say Swiss made right on the blade. Dollar for dollar the Bosch blades have lasted longer, cut more than the cheaper ones I’ve tried making them the better value for me.

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

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Mainiac Matt

8436 posts in 2478 days


#9 posted 04-15-2016 04:22 PM

Which cordless multi-tool are you using?

I’ve been thinking about getting the 20V DeWalt

-- I yam what I yam and that's all what I yam

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devann

2246 posts in 2842 days


#10 posted 04-15-2016 06:37 PM

With cordless power tools I’ve come full circle, went back to Makita, remember that 9.6 from the ‘80s?

I’ve only used the cordless Makita and a corded Rockwell. I’m not sure that it matters which tool for most applications. You’re kinda stuck with what brand of cordless batteries you’ve been buying if you want cordless.

A buddy of mine wanted one liked mine when I told him it was $100. When I told him batteries not included and that batteries were $100 he bought himself the Rockwell.

He had put done some floor tile and his wife decided she didn’t like the grout color. I jumped in there with him and we both went at it with grout removal tools that you can get for them. We discovered that the Rockwell didn’t have as wide a speed range as the Makita. The Makita would go slower and that evidently makes for faster gout removal.

I’ve found too many uses to list for multi tools. Like I said above, they’re kind like a power chisel. They’re great for scrapping stuff. I’ve even used it on my pickup truck. I threw the serpentine belt one day. No big deal I thought, until I discovered how badly it wrapped around the harmonic balancer. Not wanting to remove the pulley I resorted to the multi tool with a small bi metal blade. Cut right through those steel wires embedded in that belt allowing me to remove all of the belt easily.

I figure a DeWalt would work as well as the Makita. Myself, I have lots of yellow & black tools in my tool box.
The newer ones probably have a tool-less blade changing feature. I’m still using a 3/16” allen wrench.

For 95% of what I use the tool for, I use the blade I wrote the review for. The radius at the end of the blade makes it so much easier to control and to keep from jumping out sideways when you first begin your plunge cut.

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

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