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Sweet Jig

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Review by Smeric28 posted 06-02-2009 07:50 PM 3180 views 1 time favorited 18 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Sweet Jig No-picture-s No-picture-s Click the pictures to enlarge them

Though i thought it was a little expensive when I bought it from woodcrafters I think this honing jig is awesome. I use the scary sharp system and it works great for it. the best part about this jig is that the guide you attach let’s you set a consistent square bevel every time. when you try it you’ll be surprised how far some of your chisels have gotten from spec.

I found a few things about the jig confusing (the manual wasn’t very clear) so i’ll give you guys some tips first of all there is an adjustment on the brass roller for a micro bevel. I love this feature but I was confused about which position to start in. If you hold the jig upright and look from the side 0deg is where you should start if you need to shape the bevel then for 1 deg microbevel go one stop right or left 90 or 270 deg. they seem to be the same. if you want to go 2 deg turn 2 stops to 180 deg for the maximum. What is happening is that the brass roller in on an eccentric bearing meaning the axis of rotation is not in the center of the bearing and when you rotate the center axel you are giving the device just a little more height. I found when using this feature I liked to microbevel in the 180 deg pos.

Second if you got some really crappy chisels like i do always check to make sure the factory ground bevel is square to the side of the chisel. Mine were not, and I couldn’t figure out why i was only sharpening the left or right side of the bevel. At first I thought it was a problem with the jig but fear not. It was actually squaring up the bevel. If you find yourself in this position I would recommend a 120-150 grit sandpaper and hit it dry in the jig. Grind it until you can see the “new” scratch marks all the way across the bevel i personally didn’t see the need to regrind the whole bevel i just went till i saw about an 1/8” of new bevel then I went up the grits as usual.

Just one last thing, when you tighten up the clamp on the chisel try and tighten both thumb screws equally as possible I wasn’t careful about this and it allowed the chisel to rotate. This was because I was essentially grabbing it at one small point when i had tightened up the clamp unevenly. This cause the jig to grab at an angle to the flat of the chisel. I found that occasionally looking at the thread in the top when you are tightening and trying to get them to look the same works very well in getting things balanced. Once i figured out that trick I was golden.

The only little caveat i noticed that was not user related (me screwing it up), was that the dovetail where the angle setting part attaches doesn’t always slide smooth and after sharpening about 5 chisels it has started to scratch the paint there. This really doesn’t bother me a whole lot but it is kind of noticeable when compared to the smooth precise action of the rest of the jig. I almost wish they had left it unpainted and or used a bearing surface different than the zinc alum alloy the body of the fixture is made from so that the angle setter would slide on smoothly. I mean for ~$70 i think it should be perfect lol :)

UPDATE: So I figured out how to edit my review YEA!!!! Anyway i spritzed the dovetail with some of this magical yellow lubricating juice i got and now it slides smooth as a baby’s butt

-- "Think harder, Homer."




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Smeric28

9 posts in 2028 days



18 comments so far

View Greg..the Cajun Wood Artist's profile

Greg..the Cajun Wood Artist

5264 posts in 2056 days


#1 posted 06-02-2009 07:55 PM

I purchased the same sharpening jig sever months ago and my chisels and handplane blades have never been sharpened as easily and accurately. Foe me it was an excellent choice!

-- Each step of every Wood Art project I design and build is considered my masterpiece… because I want the finished product to reflect the quality and creativeness of my work

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Smeric28

9 posts in 2028 days


#2 posted 06-02-2009 07:55 PM

ugg sorry for the couple of spelling errors. should have been more careful with the automatic spell check. I wish we could edit our posts after we make them lol oh well….

-- "Think harder, Homer."

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pommy

1697 posts in 2439 days


#3 posted 06-02-2009 08:12 PM

Hi Smeric you can edit before you post friend just use the preview button just in the right hand corner

we look forward to viewing your projects soon

Andy

-- cut it saw it scrap it SKPE: ANDREW.CARTER69

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PurpLev

8476 posts in 2396 days


#4 posted 06-02-2009 10:02 PM

I have the same jig and find it fantastic – I do not have any issues with the angle setting fixture though not sliding easily – are you releasing the thumb screw enough? mine slides out like hot butter.

Edit: one small suggestion though: this is a terrific review, but after 2 lines into it- I found it hard for me to keep my place as I got lost in the text – recommendation = break this text into paragraphs. it’ll make it easier to read, and will group different parts separate from one another.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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Smeric28

9 posts in 2028 days


#5 posted 06-02-2009 10:07 PM

yea i am, since the sliding is kinda rough usually i loosen it enough to pull it straight off, which annoys me because i have to tighten it up again to get it on for the next one. Maybe i’ll try a little oil on it. i got this stuff that works like a champ also from woodcrafters maybe i should post a review on that one next :)

Yea i’ll proof my next review a little better, this one was basically a steam of consciousness i cranked out straight through.

-- "Think harder, Homer."

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stefang

13633 posts in 2082 days


#6 posted 06-02-2009 10:29 PM

I bought this jig too. It is an excellent jig, but after learning how to hone by hand I only use it for my plane irons. I have also found that you don’t really need the gauge attachment. I just insert the blade in the jig while in the working position on the stone and move it forward until the bevel lays flat on the stone. Then I tighten the locking screw, turn the micro bevel nob a notch and bingo I’m ready to go. This same technique could also be used on chisels. I use my chisels a lot and found it too time consuming to hone them in the jig as often as I should. I learned the hand honing technique from a video on a tool sales website. I can’t remember the website name. They sell only hand tools. I don’t mean to take away the joy you have of owning this jig and I do like mine too, but thought after using the jig awhile you might come to the same conclusion as me, and I thought maybe this tip would be helpful at that time.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

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PurpLev

8476 posts in 2396 days


#7 posted 06-02-2009 10:34 PM

stefang – I think it comes with experience and with the amount of honing that you do – for someone that hones chisels on a daily basis – or on a weekly basis – after a while it becomes second nature – but to start with ,and for those of us that don’t get that much shop time to train out muscles to keep the blade at the proper angle- this jig is a life saver ,and transforms the disappointment of sharpening a chisel for 30 min only to get a dull blade – into a 1 minute miracle. PS – are you hollow grinding your chisels for freehand honing? that helps a lot (if you have a grinder that is – which I don’t :) ).

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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SCOTSMAN

5586 posts in 2333 days


#8 posted 06-02-2009 10:58 PM

I can’t specifically comment on this as I don’t have one as I dont need one however , in general I think there stuff is highly overpriced sorry but I got a couple of veritas implements and find it basically way overpriced for example I got the veritas direct reading caliper selling here in the uk for around $80 us its a piece of cheap metal knocked together probably for about $2 each in China way overpriced light and nasty.Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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Smeric28

9 posts in 2028 days


#9 posted 06-03-2009 03:27 AM

Stefang – actually can hone things by hand but simply matching the current angle on your chisel to the paper does not let you change the angle if you decided you want to regrind them high or low angle and 98% of us would have no hope of regrinding a straight bevel freehand. Although if i wanted to just touch them up i might not bother with the jig. on a completely different topic have you every tried to grind a twist drill by hand. i know a couple of guys at work who can freehand them sharper than they come from the factory now that’s a challenge lol

Scotsman – Why did you bother to comment just to hate on veritas? I think it would be far more productive if you were to write a review about those calipers.

-- "Think harder, Homer."

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stefang

13633 posts in 2082 days


#10 posted 06-03-2009 12:08 PM

Smeric, Yes I do freehand my twist drills with good results. I use the side of the grinder. Not normally a safe procedure but ok with drills using a light touch.

I use a Veritas grinding jig for the main bevel, usually 25 degrees, and then do a micro bevel at about 30 degrees by hand. It really isn’t difficult.

I did mention that when I use the honing jig for plane irons I just lay the main bevel flat and then turn the micro bevel knob to raise the blade for a micro bevel. I tried honing by hand for years with only mediocre results. That’s why I bought the honing jig.

I just happened to be cruising the web a couple of years ago and found this website that showed how to sharpen by hand. It was a revelation and so simple. The reason I like it better than the jig is because it’s so much quicker and easier. I’m not trying to say that it is for everybody. If you like the jig and you don’t mind spending the extra time to use it you will get an equally good result. For many, this will be the way to go. I just wanted to offer a good alternative to those who, like me are a little impatient.

I move a lot slower nowadays than I used to and I want to maximize my productive time. I realize that to be of value, a tutorial is necessary. I will try it in this forum. I’m not sure how good it will be, as I’m probably not a very good teacher. I hope I haven’t offended anyone. I’m not a hand tool or handwork fanatic.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

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FatScratch

189 posts in 2050 days


#11 posted 06-03-2009 02:14 PM

I own this jig and find it to be outstanding. I love the bevel gauge and the build quality is great. It makes sharpening quick and easy for me, with repeatable results.

View Francisco Luna's profile

Francisco Luna

936 posts in 2141 days


#12 posted 06-03-2009 06:39 PM

It’s a nice jig, well designed but I think needs more work….

-The bridge that holds the blades becomes bent when holding narrow chisels. It’s a weak piece of aluminum.
- I use water stones, so inevitably water goes inside the roller; it gets rusted if it’s not properly oiled, but drops of oil on my $90 stones are not good neither.

It’s highly accurate, well designed, the camber roller is a plus!

-- Nature is my manifestation of God. I go to nature every day for inspiration in the day's work. I follow in building the principles which nature has used in its domain" Frank Lloyd Wright

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laflaone

59 posts in 2428 days


#13 posted 06-04-2009 02:29 PM

Ditto on the camber roller. It works great. This is a great jig. There is just no way that the average “do it by hand” person is going to get such an even, accurate, and repeatable edge.

-- "non illegitimis carborundum"

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Bret

162 posts in 2242 days


#14 posted 06-04-2009 05:35 PM

Thanks for the review! I had been looking at one of these as a “bridge” until I can fork over the dough for a Tormek. Picked it up yesterday and am looking forward to working with it this weekend on some of my old, beat-up chisels before taking it to my brand new Sorby chisel.

-- Woodworking is easy as 3.14159265358979323846264338327950288419716939937510...

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Francisco Luna

936 posts in 2141 days


#15 posted 06-11-2009 05:19 PM

After almost 4 years of use and abuse, I sold my MARK II yesterday at ebay for $52!! more what I originaly paid for it…..it’s not amazing the way FINE handtools retain the value???

-- Nature is my manifestation of God. I go to nature every day for inspiration in the day's work. I follow in building the principles which nature has used in its domain" Frank Lloyd Wright

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