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Review by mrg posted 02-28-2016 01:23 PM 2628 views 0 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Don't buy No-picture-s No-picture-s Click the pictures to enlarge them

Bought this stand the other day. Get it home take it out of the box, simple to setup. Can’t get the thing to be level when tightening the screws. The pipe shifts because it’s to small for the casting, the top base sits all wonky only has one screw to mount .

Taking back, bought a Sears stand for less and works fine.

-- mrg




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mrg

840 posts in 3205 days



8 comments so far

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5203 posts in 3449 days


#1 posted 02-28-2016 04:39 PM

I made my own using a piece of pipe and an old brake drum filled with concrete. The top of the pipe has a pipe flange that is screwed to wood for the grinder base. It is sturdy and has lasted 40 years so far. It doesn’t get any easier than that.

View Bothus's profile

Bothus

441 posts in 3382 days


#2 posted 02-29-2016 04:23 PM

MrG,

Very timely review. We were just talking about buying a grinder and stand at HF.

Do you have a HF grinder? If so, how is it?

MrRon,

Great idea. Was it a large brake drum like from a truck or something?

-- Jerry Boshear, Professional Kitchen Designer, amature woodworker.

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5767 posts in 3437 days


#3 posted 02-29-2016 05:13 PM

I would think with the concrete fill, a brake drum from just about any old mid size car on up to a truck would do the job quite nicely. Just place the drum open side down on a piece of plywood with some plastic sheeting between the wood and the drum,, have your threaded iron pipe cut and threaded, ready to go in, mix and pour your concrete into the drum through the hub hole, jam the pipe in, jig it up the stay vertical and let it cure. Once cured, thread the flange on to the pipe, remove drum / concrete blob from plywood / plastic, attach wood platform to pipe flange, and attach grinder.

A bit hard to level, but not impossible. Certainly sturdy and stable… And most likely cheaper than the HF thing…

-- Please like and subscribe to my YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/c/daves-workshop

View mrg's profile

mrg

840 posts in 3205 days


#4 posted 03-01-2016 12:40 AM

I returned the stand, Harbor Freight didn’t even ask why. I cruised down the street and bought the Craftsman stand at Sears for less money. The stand went together real easy and is rock solid.

Bothus, I have a Ryobi grinder with CBN wheels on it. The grinder runs smooth as silk with these wheels. I had the white wheels on it and could never get the wheels balanced quite right. I had machined bushings etc. I bought the wheels for my turning tools.

-- mrg

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Woodknack

12431 posts in 2585 days


#5 posted 03-01-2016 02:37 AM

I looked at this stand last week but didn’t buy after reading the website reviews, many made the same complaint about the column being too narrow.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1853 posts in 2522 days


#6 posted 03-02-2016 05:37 PM

Pipe, concrete and a 5-gallon bucket work pretty well.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View Richard's profile

Richard

1922 posts in 2896 days


#7 posted 03-03-2016 08:30 PM


I would think with the concrete fill, a brake drum from just about any old mid size car on up to a truck would do the job quite nicely. Just place the drum open side down on a piece of plywood with some plastic sheeting between the wood and the drum,, have your threaded iron pipe cut and threaded, ready to go in, mix and pour your concrete into the drum through the hub hole, jam the pipe in, jig it up the stay vertical and let it cure. Once cured, thread the flange on to the pipe, remove drum / concrete blob from plywood / plastic, attach wood platform to pipe flange, and attach grinder.

A bit hard to level, but not impossible. Certainly sturdy and stable… And most likely cheaper than the HF thing…

- dbhost


If you can weld the pipe into the center hole on the drum and level it at that time , you can just turn it upside down and pour the concrete into the drum and let it set up. You can also fill the pipe with concrete at the same time to add more weight.

View twotenths's profile

twotenths

7 posts in 1007 days


#8 posted 03-16-2016 11:29 AM

Thank you for the heads-up.

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